Tag Archives: WordPress

A Term on my Class Blog⤴

from @ wwwd – John's World Wide Wall Display

I’ve now been running blogs with & for my classes since 2005. I still find them a really useful tool for teaching and learning. The focus and content has changed continually over the years.

Back in the noughties I was keen on having my class blog kept up by pupils (archive.org link).

I find this harder to organise now, not sure if it is my age, the demands of the curriculum or something else. Pupils in my class now post to their e-Portfolios1 and add pieces of work to the class blog which I collate into posts. I also pinch quotes from their e-portfolios for the class blog2.

Like my own blog here I still find my class blog a great resource to remember & review. Of course it is a curated view. Much depends on what I am finding most interesting at the time. I both enjoy reading back and use it as a tool when asked for feedback or a record of some sort.

I was somewhat cheered up by Matt Mullenweg’s birthday. Sometimes it feels like WordPress is focused on content management. Matt’s post show that blogging is still loved.
While content management is a main focus of Glow Blogs my love is blogging. I still think we are only scratching the surface of the use of WordPress in school3.

Posts Last Term (Oct 2023 – Dec 2023 on my class blog )

  1. Glow Blogs – WordPress blogs for Scottish Education
  2. example of quote collection
  3. H5P for example

Listened: 246 – Building your own social network with the Friends plugin⤴

from @ wwwd – John's World Wide Wall Display

Listened 246 – Building your own social network with the Friends plugin by Nathan WrigleyNathan Wrigley from wpbuilds.com

So you love Facebook and you hate Facebook, you love Twitter and you hate Twitter. You love… You get the idea! If you’re anything like me you have at times questioned how much time you’ve spent trawling through social media. You may even be worried about how much data they’ve been gathering about you, or perhaps thinking about whether or not we’re even able to escape from it all. On the podcast today we’ve got Alex Kirk, and he certainly has been thinking about all of this. So much so in fact that he’s built a social network plugin for WordPress. Listen to the podcast to find out all about it…

So you love Facebook and you hate Facebook, you love Twitter and you hate Twitter. You love… You get the idea! If you’re anything like me you have at times questioned how much time you’ve spent trawling through social media. You may even be worried about how much data they’ve been gathering about you, or perhaps thinking about whether or not we’re even able to escape from it all. On the podcast today we’ve got Alex Kirk, and he certainly has been thinking about all of this. So much so in fact that he’s built a social network plugin for WordPress. Listen to the podcast to find out all about it…

Really interesting podcast discussing the Friends WordPress plugin with its author Alex Kirk. A lot of interesting features, including a built in RSS reader and a WordPress to WordPress social network.

I had a couple of thoughts, I wonder if this would work on a WordPress multi-site like Glow Blogs?

I also wondered if importing all these posts you were reading would bloat your own blog? This was answered in the podcast, you can set the number of posts kept or the length of time to keep them.

Alex did mention the IndieWeb, so I am wondering if there is much integration, with webmentions or bookmarking for example.

Obviously to use the social part you need friends using the plugin, but I think I’ll install it somewhere to see how it works as an RSS reader when i have a mo.

 

Links for Glow Blogs⤴

from @ wwwd – John's World Wide Wall Display

A couple of links for the future of Glow Blogs & one that is useful now (go Gutenburg).

Block theme generator – Full Site Editing

Submit the form to create a .zip file with your own WordPress starter theme for full site editing.

Part of WordPress full site editing and themes – Full Site Editing

Full site editing is a set of new WordPress features that helps us edit all parts of our website: Block themes, template editing, site blocks, and global styles.

Go Gutenberg – Learn the New WordPress Editor

Find Your Way Around Gutenberg introduces a brand new writing experience for your WordPress-powered site.

We’ll show you how to navigate the new interface and save time while editing.

H5P interactive content in Glow Blogs⤴

from @ wwwd – John's World Wide Wall Display

Well I am quite excited. There is a new plugin in Glow Blogs, H5P. This is quite different from anything else in blogs.

H5P is a system for creating interactive HTML5 content. It can work inside several types of publishing platforms including WordPress.

The range of content types that you can create with H5P is pretty wide. Some are ways of presenting material, accordions, image galleries. Others are learning activities, quizzes, multi-choice questions, word searches and crosswords. More sophisticated types include interactive video. Videos can be paused by viewers to respond to questions and quizzes and 360 tours. Responses to quizzes, cloze procedures etc are gathered from logged on users.

You can combine these content types , or display them on a blog in different ways.

I’ve spent a bit of time making some simple examples for Glow Blogs which has allowed me to start to think about how best to use these.

I’ve also started to build up a small bank of resources for spelling for my class: igh example. So far I am only scratching the surface.

I’ve always enjoyed making online resources for my classes to use. but these can take a lot of time and can be difficult to make presentable or present. The H5P plug-in solves many of these problems and are made “inside” the blog.
Having them on a blog allows resources to be quite easily organised. The Display Posts plug-in or using the make theme helps. Post listing in Gutenberg will be useful too.

Here are a couple of examples embedded from Glow Blogs.

A 360 tour:

and a fill in the missing words exercise.

H5P interactive content in Glow Blogs⤴

from @ wwwd – John's World Wide Wall Display

Well I am quite excited. There is a new plugin in Glow Blogs, H5P. This is quite different from anything else in blogs.

H5P is a system for creating interactive HTML5 content. It can work inside several types of publishing platforms including WordPress.

The range of content types that you can create with H5P is pretty wide. Some are ways of presenting material, accordions, image galleries. Others are learning activities, quizzes, multi-choice questions, word searches and crosswords. More sophisticated types include interactive video. Videos can be paused by viewers to respond to questions and quizzes and 360 tours. Responses to quizzes, cloze procedures etc are gathered from logged on users.

You can combine these content types , or display them on a blog in different ways.

I’ve spent a bit of time making some simple examples for Glow Blogs which has allowed me to start to think about how best to use these.

I’ve also started to build up a small bank of resources for spelling for my class: igh example. So far I am only scratching the surface.

I’ve always enjoyed making online resources for my classes to use. but these can take a lot of time and can be difficult to make presentable or present. The H5P plug-in solves many of these problems and are made “inside” the blog.
Having them on a blog allows resources to be quite easily organised. The Display Posts plug-in or using the make theme helps. Post listing in Gutenberg will be useful too.

Here are a couple of examples embedded from Glow Blogs.

A 360 tour:

and a fill in the missing words exercise.

WordPress logon redirect⤴

from @ wwwd – John's World Wide Wall Display

I’ve had to search for this one several times so putting it here so that it might make it stick or be easier to find.

Sometimes working with my pupils I want to send them to a blog, have them logged on but not go to the dashboard.

the login url has a redirect_to parameter.

So I I use a url like
blog-address/wp-login.php?redirect_to=page-I-want-the-pupil-to-go-to

Where blog-address is the blog I want them to log on to and page-I-want-the-pupil-to-go-to is a relative or full url

I often share notes to my class via AirDrop and hide long urls but typing a name, selecting it and making it a link, ⌘-k on mac. Unfortunalty you have to create linked text in another app on iOs and paste it in.

An Advent Calendar in #GlowBlogs⤴

from @ wwwd – John's World Wide Wall Display

I’ve been asked about this sort of thing a few times now and not had an answer. It came to me on Friday, but I couldn’t test it at lunchtime as we had no internet in school.

I’ve played around with the idea this weekend and it works. Of course it could be a lot prettier.

Basically I’ve set up an Advent Calendar where you can click on doors to revel information. You can only see the content that has been published and the info is qued up in Scheduled posts (pages in this case).

Using the Draw Attention and my favourite Display Posts plugins. Here is the Demo: Advent Calendar – An Example Glow Blog for Christmas

Here is a gif.

HeyPressto, a conference on Twitter⤴

from @ Sharing and learning

Pat Lockley (of the pedagogical and technical outfitters Pgogy Webstuff) and I did a thing last week: HeyPressto, a WordPress and ClassicPress conference which happened only on Twitter.  That’s right, a conference on Twitter: presentations were a series of 15 Tweets, one per minute with the conference hashtag, in a scheduled time slot. Adding images, gifs or links to the tweets allows presenters to go into a bit more depth than Twitter’s character limit would suggest. Replies to tweets, and other forms of engagement, allow discussion to develop around the issues raised.  It was also semi-synchronous–or asynchronous after the event if you like: the tweets persist, they can be revisited, engagement can be continued. One way in which the tweets persist is that Pat turned all the presentations into Twitter moments, so first thing you should do if you missed the event is to go to the schedule page and look at some of the presentations that are linked from it.

Ethos

“We want to be the best we can” was a phrase Pat used in describing our efforts.

We wanted to be inclusive. Having the conference on Twitter faciliates this through removal of financial, geographic and logistical obstacles to participation. However, we know that Twitter’s not a great place for people from many groups, and so we felt that a code of conduct was important even though we doubt who has the authority to set and enforce such a code for an open-participation conference. Our code came originally from the Open Code of Conduct from the TODOGroup, and has been through a few other communities (such as #FemEdTech and Open Scotand), so thank you to them for providing a broader basis than we could manage ourselves. We also set ourselves goals for accessibility and privacy that I hope we lived up to. I was pleased that these were noticed and commented on more than once, I think they set a standard if nothing else.

We wanted participation from all around the world, and not just in English. It was clear that we wouldn’t deserve this if the call was only in English, so it had to be translated. It wasn’t easy to chose which languages to translate into: we looked at which are the most widely spoken languages, but also tried to take into account which languages were spoken by the people furthest from justice.  We were half successful. We had presentations from India, Africa, Europe and North America, but not in the proportions we would have liked and all in English. It’s hard to get out of your bubble, to do this properly we would have to start with more diversity on the organization side.

We wanted to value people’s work and the environment. We paid for what we used (translations, for example). Pat found the susty theme, which is incredibly lightweight  and so easier on the carbon footprint with the bonus that it is lightning fast (a cache slowed it down). We’ll be planting some trees to offset the carbon that we did use.

Organization

This isn’t the first conference Pat has done on Twitter, he and Natalie Lafferty have run the very successful PressEd conference on WordPress in Education for three years, indeed it was my helping out a little on last years PressEd that got Pat and me talking about HeyPressto. As well as experience of all the things that need doing, Pat has a WordPress plugin for running the conference that manages lots of the submission process, communication with authors, scheduling and creations of pages for each presentation. I found myself trying to be as useful as could be around the core activities that Pat had sussed.

Starting with initial discussions in April, we chose a name (a few hours of discussion, and then Pat’s partner coming up with the right name in an instant), set up social media accounts (Twitter mostly, obvs), set up a domain (thank you Reclaim), email address, and ko-fi account. Pat’s artistic skills gave us great visuals and our mascot Hopful Bunny. We drafted the call for proposals, spent quite a while trying to work out what languages to translate it into. The call went out at the end of July.

It’s hard getting a Twitter thing going from zero to conference in a couple of months. Our networks helped—thank you friends, it wouldn’t have happened without your support, amplification and participation—but one of the things that we wanted to do was to reach beyond our own social, cultural and geographic bubbles. We got picked up by a couple of podcast channels, so you can hear us talking about HeyPressto on Radio EduTalk and the Sentree blog Thank you John and Michelle. (I think these were the first podcast / internet radio things I have been on, I’ve been pretty good at refusing them until now, and they were nothing like as stressful as I had feared). We picked up followers, and some who supported us quite actively. I want to give a special shout out to @getClassicPress because the engagement from the ClassicPress community strongly contrasted with the blanking from the big noises in the  WordPress community.

Perhaps because we were going outside our own community, there were quite a few folk who didn’t seem to get what we were doing. We listened and re-doubled our efforts to explain, provide examples, respond to feedback on what was confusing. I’m proud of our efforts to fix things that weren’t clear.

The rest was smooth running. Proposals came in steadily. Presentations were scheduled. Advice given to presenters who were unfamiliar with the format. We continued to promote and made new friends who boosted our message. Time zones were a problem. Introductory Tweets were scheduled. Presentations were presented (mostly at the right time), and I think the day went really quite well.

Personal Highlights

I’ve mentioned some of my highlights in the process described above. I’ld also like to call out a few of the presenters that I personally appreciated, without prejudice to the others who also did a great job:

Jan Koch, our opening presenter, did a fine presentation but backed it up with a video version of great professionalism. Superb effort, Jan.

Frances Bell and Lorna M Campbell gave a great presentation on #FemEdTech that  absolutely hit the spot on a number of problematic issues such as being equitable, accessible & inclusive in a place that can be “driven by algorithms & plagued by bots”.

Chris Aldrich whose presentation gave a name and coherence to something that I have long wanted to try, and providing enough hints on how to do it that I might yet get there.

Many presenters (too many to list , it turns out, without just reproducing the schedule page) gave really useful hints on approaches they use, or stories of their experience in implementing them, and inspiration for what I want to try next.

Speaking of what I want to try next, the ClassicPress presentations (roughly covering “why” & “how“) deserve special mention for their engagement with this baffling thing that a conference on Twitter is.

Finally, I think the most important presentation of the day was from Ronald Huereca on Mental Illness in Tech

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