How is it almost August?⤴

from

This is another of those blog posts that starts “Where the hell have the last two months gone?!”  I’ve been sorely neglecting this blog since early May, not because I’ve got nothing to write about, quite the opposite, I’ve been so busy I haven’t had a chance to get near it!  I’m about to go off on annual leave for a couple of weeks but I wanted to post a quick round up of the last two months before I go, so here’s wot I have been up to.

Innovation Projects

UoE OKN, CC BY Natalie Lankester-Carthy

A lot of my time has been tied up with two Information Services Innovation Fund projects.  The UoE Open Knowledge Network was a small project that aimed at drawing together the University’s activities in the area of Open Data, Open Access, Open Education, Open Research, Open Collections and Archives, to support cross-fertilisation and promote the institution’s activities in these areas. We ran three events, with the last one taking place in early July.  This event focussed on discussing priorities, ideas for the future and how we can sustain the network going forward.  You can read about the first two events on the project blog here: UoE Open Knowledge Network and I’ll be writing up the July event when I get back from leave in August.

The aim of the second project was to develop a MOOC for entrepreneurs, creative individuals, and SMEs to help them develop the knowledge and skills to find and access free and open licensed research, data and content produced by universities and higher education. I was lucky enough to recruit Morna Simpson of Geek Girl Scotland to work on the project however despite our best efforts and an incredible amount of work on Morna’s part the project faced a number of challenges which we struggled to overcome.  Rather than go ahead with a MOOC we will be releasing a series of twelve case studies on the theme of Innovating with Open Knowledge demonstrating how individuals and organisations can access and use the open outputs of University of Edinburgh research.  These case studies should be finished by early August so watch this space!

Media Hopper Replay

The University of Edinburgh is in the process of rolling out a new state of the art lecture recoding service, Media Hopper Replay, which will see 400 rooms enabled to deliver lecture recording by 2019.  As part of a training programme for staff, my colleague Charlie Farley and I have been developing training sessions on preparing for lecture recording covering accessible presentation design, copyright basics, and using open educational resources.

ALT

City of Glasgow College, CC BY Lorna M. Campbell

I was honoured to be invited by ALT to join the selection panel for the prestigious Learning Technologist of the Year Awards.  The quality and diversity of the entries was really inspiring and while I thoroughly enjoyed reading all the entries it wasn’t easy to pick the best from such a strong field.  The winners of the awards will be announced at the ALT Annual Conference which this year takes place at the University of Liverpool.  I’ll be there rejoining my old partner in crime Richard Goodman to provide social media coverage of the conference for the third year running.

In June I also helped to organise ALT Scotland’s annual conference which focused on sharing strategy, practice and policy in learning technology.  We had really interesting talks on lecture recording policy and practice from the Universities of Edinburgh and Glasgow and Joe Wilson reported back from two European open education policy events he recently attended on behalf of Open Scotland.  The real star of the show however was City of Glasgow College’s new state of the art campus where the event took place.

Celtic Knot Conference

In early July I was busy helping UoE’s Wikimedian in Residence, Ewan McAndrew, plan the University of Edinburgh / Wikimedia UK Celtic Knot Conference.  The conference showcased innovative approaches to open education, open knowledge and open data to support and grow Celtic and Indigenous language communities, and explore how our cultural heritage can be preserved as living languages.  The conference was attended by delegates from all over Europe and was an enormous success.  It was a real privilege to be involved in this event and as a Gael, I found the conference to be both moving and inspiring.  I may have got a little starry eyed listening to delegates talking animatedly in Gaelic, Welsh, Breton, Basque and too many other languages to mention.  And as an indication of the collaborative and supportive nature of the event, it was great to see all 50+ delegates come together to provide input and advice to Wikimedia Norge on how to support Sami language Wikipedia.

 

Wikimedia UK

Last weekend I was at the Wikimedia UK AGM and Board Meeting in London where it was a real pleasure to see Josie Fraser voted in as new chair of the Wikimedia Board and our very own UoE Wikimedia in Residence Ewan McAndrew awarded a very well deserved joint Wikimedian of the Year award together with Kelly Foster.  It was also great to hear that Sara Thomas has been appointed as the new Wikimedian in Residence at the Scottish Libraries and Information Council.

CMALT

And on top of all that I somehow managed to submit my CMALT portfolio at the end of May! Although it was a lot of hard work, and although I went right to wire (of course), I actually enjoyed the process of putting my portfolio together and I found it really useful to step back and reflect on my experience of working as a learning technologist in the broadest sense of the word. I would still like to write a proper post reflecting on my experience of developing my portfolio in the open but that will have to wait until the autumn.

That’s just a few of the things that have been taking up most of my time over the last couple of months.  I’m now off for a fortnight’s holiday during which we are going to attempt to coax our aged VW van to take us all the way to Brittany.  If we make it to the Borders we’ll be lucky!   I’ll be back in early August with a new role at the University of Edinburgh as Learning Technology Team Leader in the Department of Education Development and Engagement.

DYW Interesting Practice- Ellon Academy: ‘Work-related Learning’ offer enhance pupils’ employability skills⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

In response to the new Work Placements Standard, Ellon Academy has introduce their ‘Work-related Learning’ model  in collaboration with local business and employers offered as an option choice for all pupils in the senior phase.   Leaners are given the opportunity to   participate in  internship-style work placements one day a week from August to Easter and are able to select from a wide range of  sectors including journalism, education, hospitality, performing arts, event management child care.  Supplementary lessons in school allow participants to reflect on their   learning experience, enhance newly developed skills and at the same time gain a National Progression Award in Enterprise and Employability at level 4 or 5.

Access the summary information sheet to find out more about this innovative approach:

Interesting Practice in Skills DYW – Ellon Academy

Hear from some of the pupils about their ‘work-related learning’ experiences:

 

 

Adventures in microblogging part 3⤴

from @ wwwd – John's World Wide Wall Display

It is a about three months since I started using the miro.blog app it has been really interesting, to me, to use this blog in a slightly different way. I’ve certainly not come to any earth shattering conclusions but am enjoying using the ‘service’ thinking about all sorts of associated things.

I’ve categorised 132 posts as micro here, compared to a handful of standard posts. These posts would have been things I posted to Twitter or Instagram in the past. Now they go to micro.blog/johnjohnston and Twitter.

twitter replacement

Not quite. I’ve posted more things straight to twitter. I’ve enjoyed the 280 character limit on micro.blog but still have used Twitter directly for posting education related things, joining in the #30daytdc ds106 tweetfest in July and replying to tweets. The stuff I’ve sent through micro.blog has been more general internet stuff and thoughts about microblogging/indieweb. I didn’t think about this too much just went with what felt right.

Instagram replacement

The Micro.blog app is a nice simple photo sharer. The fact that the image is posted on your own blog first gives a nice warm indieweb feeling. I’ve still posted the odd picture to instagram mainly for the other nice warm feeling that comes from likes. I get a lot more likes on Instagram than I do on photos posted here and to twitter even though I’ve a much bigger following on Twitter than Instagram.
I flirted briefly with Youowngram and a WordPress plugin before that but I’ve not settled on some way of incorporating Instagram into a workflow.

micro.blog community

I’ve enjoyed a bit of interaction on micro.blog itself and the associated slack channel. It is fascinating watching quite a small group of folk figuring out how this new service, or perhaps layer on existing services works for them.

indieweb

I’ve dabbled in indieweb principles for a while on this blog. The theme I use is build for it and I’ve a bunch of plugins that help connect this blog with other services. Using micro.blog has brought me into contact with a lot more indieweb folk and helped my understanding of how things could work. Again it is nice to see others exploring and thinking this out loud.

A useful resource I’ve found is Chris Aldrich’s Opml list of indieweb RSS feeds. I’ve subscribed to this in Inoreader and added as a tab on my River5 setup not only have I seen some familiar faces from the ds106 universe I am getting to read lots of great content about this stuff.

Colin Walker’s blog Social Thoughts is another great resource (part of the indieweb opml too). Colin has been narrating in great detail both technical and philosophical ideas surrounding microblogging and he has a great Microcast too.

I am beginning to see how conversations can cross domains and belong to participants rather than the silos they take place in.

Still tweekin’

I am still trying to more fully understand how this all works and how best to organise things here. I do think it is still fairly complicated to set up a blog following all of the indieweb principles. It also looks like it is getting simpler all the time. The indieweb WordPress plugins are getting regularly updated and the future looks bright.

The whole microblogging experience is leading me to re-thinking my approach to social media, podcasting and blogging and I am really enjoying the process.

I’ve also enjoyed the minor geeky things I’ve been playing with, posting to microblog from drafts on iOS using the workflow app and using AppleScript from a mac. Not big or interesting to many other folk but it is how I get my fun.

 

The featured image on this post is of a conversation from this morning that took place on microblog and reflected in the comments here.

DYW Interesting Practice – Dalgety Bay Primary School: The Career Education Standard at the heart of school planning⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Laura Spence  , HT at Dalgety Bay Primary School has adopted a unique approach to ensure that career education is an integral part of the school improvement planning.  Embracing  the Career Education Standard 3-18  all staff have used Learning Resource 1:  Introduction to the Career Education Standard in order to embed the entitlements into the learning and teaching across the school.

This approach has become a cluster model and has been recognised by  and share across Fife Council .

The school’s vision of realising their ambitions to provide all children with opportunities to connect leanring with the world of work include the following actions :

  • Teachers will provide creative opportunities to develop the skills for life in meaningful and relevant contexts within their class.
  • All teacher will deliver 4D learning intentions, consistently linking each lesson to career education.
  • Our weekly assemblies will regularly include information on specific careers, making children aware of the range of employment opportunities on offer.
  • Children  from P5 onwards will have access to the ‘My World of Work’ website where they will have the opportunity to explore different career options focusing on skills and qualifications.
  • Classroom displays and planning will include links to Career Education throughout the school.
  • We will continue to engage with local business partners and beyond to develop contacts and create a database of professionals prepared to support the school in developing Career Education within school.
  • We will be planning and organising a Career Education Day that will take place on 22nd November 2016.

Find out more about Dalgety Bay Primary Schools approach by accessing the summary information and school DYW leaflet here:

Interesting Practice in Skills DYW – Dalgety Bay PS

Career Education Leaflet Dalgety Bay PS

 

DYW Interesting Practice – Larbert High School: Developing young peoples’ skills across all aspects of learning⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Developing learners’ skills is high on the agenda at Larbert High School.  The leadership team have adopted a systematic approach to enhancing young peoples’ skills for life and work and implemented a holistic ‘Skills Framework’ across all aspects of the curriculum.  The school uses the DYW context to offer learners a wide variety of experience and  pathways in order to ensure all young people are developing the necessary skills and aptitudes for a positive vision about the futures.  Collaboration with both the wider community and employers is elementary to the successful realisation of this goal.

The ‘Skills Framework at Larbert High School complements this agenda and ensures that all young peoples know, understand and are able to articulate  their skill sets and are able to relate these to their  career aspirations.     The following document outlines the Skills Framework:

Interesting Practice in Skills DYW – LHS Skills Framework

Hear from teachers and pupils about the structure of the Skills Framework and its impact:

Developing your skills in using an iPad in the classroom with Apple Teacher⤴

from @ ICT for Teaching & Learning in Falkirk Primary Schools

If you are using iPads in a classroom setting then you may find the free online Apple Teacher professional learning programme provides you with support for making more effective use of more features of iPads for learning and teaching.

Just go to https://www.apple.com/uk/education/apple-teacher/ and sign up for the Apple Teacher programme – you can use any existing Apple ID you may have already, or you can create an Apple ID from the site to get onto the Apple Teacher programme.

Once you are signed in you then have access to all of the interactive Apple Teacher Starter Guides which aim to guide you through various features of using an iPad in an educational setting. So whether you are looking for support in using iMovie, GarageBand, Keynote, Pages and Numbers, or simply basic features of iPad settings, further productivity settings, tools and features or ways to develop creativity with an iPad, all of which which you may find helpful in the classroom, these materials support you to become more confident and productive to use an iPad to support learning and teaching.

Each module within the Apple Teacher programme includes an associated interactive assessment quiz – as you pass each quiz you earn a badge to chart your progress. When you have completed all 8 assessment quizzes your achievement is recognised with you being awarded the designation of Apple Teacher, conferring on you the right to use the official Apple Teacher logo that you can share with the world!

If you use Twitter, or other social media platforms, you can follow the hashtag #AppleTeacher to share in the uses of iPads by colleagues worldwide.

 

Open Scotland Declaration – Still Garnering International Recognition #OER⤴

from @ ...........Experimental Blog




It is great that this work coordinated and authored by my co-conspirator and co-founder of Open Scotland , Lorna Campbell of Edinburgh University,  continues to attract global recognition and attention.

I've been responding today to the Polish Government. I know too  that the work is currently forming the basis of policy in Morocco and beyond in the middle east as well as being the basis for many other global policy initiatives.

I had to re-iterate today that the Open Scotland Declaration is a statement of intent to engage Scottish policy makers and institutions and drive changes across  our system –but it is not,  as yet government policy.

I know the Scottish Government is currently reviewing its own plans for the next five years - I hope that story changes soon.

Our progress best summarized here in Lorna's post 

In response to the enquiry around adopting Scotland's policy and giving some examples of open policy and practice in Scotland -  I responded 

  1. http://declaration.openscot.net/  is the Open Scotland Declaration,  it is an statement of ambition and demonstrates an approach towards having national policy in place.
  2. http://openscot.net/     Is the community blog from Open Scotland,  a grass roots organisation to promote greater openness. 
  3. https://oepscotland.org/   Is an example of a national initiative led by the Open University in Scotland  to encourage more open practices,  funded in part as a  response to Open Scotland.
  4. http://open.ed.ac.uk  Is an institutional response to becoming more open from Edinburgh University in part as a response to Open Scotland. 

Open Scotland Declaration – Still Garnering International Recognition #OER⤴

from @ ...........Experimental Blog




It is great that this work coordinated and authored by my co-conspirator and co-founder of Open Scotland , Lorna Campbell of Edinburgh University,  continues to attract global recognition and attention.

I've been responding today to the Polish Government. I know too  that the work is currently forming the basis of policy in Morocco and beyond in the middle east as well as being the basis for many other global policy initiatives.

I had to re-iterate today that the Open Scotland Declaration is a statement of intent to engage Scottish policy makers and institutions and drive changes across  our system –but it is not,  as yet government policy.

I know the Scottish Government is currently reviewing its own plans for the next five years - I hope that story changes soon.

Our progress best summarized here in Lorna's post 

In response to the enquiry around adopting Scotland's policy and giving some examples of open policy and practice in Scotland -  I responded 

  1. http://declaration.openscot.net/  is the Open Scotland Declaration,  it is an statement of ambition and demonstrates an approach towards having national policy in place.
  2. http://openscot.net/     Is the community blog from Open Scotland,  a grass roots organisation to promote greater openness. 
  3. https://oepscotland.org/   Is an example of a national initiative led by the Open University in Scotland  to encourage more open practices,  funded in part as a  response to Open Scotland.
  4. http://open.ed.ac.uk  Is an institutional response to becoming more open from Edinburgh University in part as a response to Open Scotland. 

How good is our early learning and childcare?⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Tha “Dè cho math ’s a tha ar tràth-ionnsachadh agus ar cùram-chloinne?”  a nis ri fhaighinn ann an Gàidhlig aig:

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/Pages/frwk1hgioearlyyears.aspx

The Gaelic version of “How good is our early learning and childcare?” is now available at:

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/Pages/frwk1hgioearlyyears.aspx