Tag Archives: Young People

Tackling the priorities in QuISE – a joined up approach?⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

 

By Alan Armstrong, Strategic Director

Our report ‘Quality and improvement in Scottish education 2012-2016’ (QuISE) points to five key aspects of education and practice which we believe should be priorities for improvement if all learners in Scotland are to achieve their potential. Many or all sectors of education should be:

  • exploiting fully the flexibility of Curriculum for Excellence to meet better the needs of all learners;
  • improving arrangements for assessment and tracking to provide personalised guidance and support throughout the learner journey;
  • maximising the contribution of partnerships with other services, parents and the wider community to enhance children’s and young people’s learning experiences;
  • improving further the use of self-evaluation and improvement approaches to ensure consistent high quality of provision; and
  • growing a culture of collaboration within and across establishments and services to drive innovation, sharing of practice and collective improvement.

Looking at these priorities from my perspective in ensuring the implementation of Curriculum for Excellence, the employability and skills agenda, and digital learning and teaching, I am struck by how the priorities inter-relate and, indeed, are interdependent.

The flexibility offered by CfE has the potential for schools to design their curriculum structures in ways that reflect fully the local contexts and aspirations of their learners. Within this, the range of progression pathways can then enable children and young people to make suitably brisk progress across the broad general education, and into and through the senior phase.  This needs to be informed by improved assessment and tracking to ensure teachers, learners and parents make the most appropriate decisions at the right time.

However, there is no doubt that the curriculum structures needed to make this a reality rely very strongly on the direct contributions of partners, including agencies and local employers. Collaborations amongst staff within and across schools, with colleagues in colleges, community learning and development and other areas of expertise all combine to enrich the curriculum and motivate learners.

In early learning and childcare provision, primary and secondary schools, the new curriculum area Benchmarks are beginning to support a clearer understanding of learners’ progression across the broad general education. This  will help teachers to plan the breadth, challenge and application of learning that will prepare young people for the three year learner journey of their senior phase.  And that of course involves collaborations and the wide range of qualifications across the SCQF framework, exploiting again the flexibility of CfE in preparing learners for their futures.

Partnerships are the essential element in Developing the Young Workforce. I’m becoming aware of increasingly effective approaches to employability, skills and career education, often promoted through three-ways partnerships amongst schools, colleges and employers.  And by now you’ll be seeing the connections with the other QuISE priorities of collaboration and more informed personal guidance that can help to exploit that full flexibility in CfE.

Digital learning and teaching has great potential to promote and improve partnership working and collaboration, locally, nationally and internationally. Teachers and pupils can gain significantly in learning from the innovative and effective practice of others.  Where digital is central in planning and delivering learning and teaching, and makes use of learners’ own digital skills or develops them further, I’m in no doubt that young people benefit.  Digital can and does support teachers in their tracking and monitoring, reducing bureaucracy and workload.  As digital access and digital skills continues to improve, the opportunities for leaders, practitioners and learners to take steps that address the QuISE priorities are significant.

The individual QuISE chapters on each education sector highlight good practice as well as challenges in providing high quality experiences for all. The key is often the distinct professionalism of leaders and practitioners, engaging individually and collaboratively to reflect and to make the changes that matter.

Finally, effective self-evaluation is central to ensuring continuous improvement in addressing the priorities in QuISE.   I am beginning to see schools, colleges, and community learning and development now looking beyond their own centre and working with all partners in undertaking self-evaluation and analysing evidence.  The benefit will be greater collective understanding of how effectively their curriculum, learning, teaching and assessment genuinely meet their learners’ needs.  Where that process leads to jointly agreed actions for improvement, I’m in no doubt that the learning experiences and the outcomes for all children and young people will also improve.

EXCHANGE – Be Seen – Be Heard – Be Inspired: An event for young people interested in the music industry⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

This unique event provides an excellent opportunity for young people interested in a career in the music industry from production to performance and connect with key people in the sector!

Date:   Friday 2 June 2017 Venue: SWG3, Glasgow

CALL OUT FOR YOUNG MUSICIANS   

Registration for the day and sign-up for performance opportunities is now open: www.mfy.org.uk/exchange 

The deadline for performance sign-ups is Monday, 1st May.

Aspiring young musicians from across Scotland will flock to SWG3, Glasgow on 2 June for Exchange 2017 – the unmissable event for young people looking to get ahead in the music industry.

Music for Youth’s Exchange is giving young performers from across Scotland the chance to learn from established artists and be inspired by industry professionals and their peers alike.  Hosted by BBC Radio Scotland’s Vic Galloway, Exchange is a whole day of keynote speakers, workshops, performances, advice, networking opportunities, a marketplace, and a line-up of music industry speakers covering a whole range of useful topics. Musicians also have the chance to be seen, and get their music heard by performing live for audiences throughout the day. Our professional Music for Youth Music Mentors will be on hand to offer each act feedback on their music and stage presence and highlight areas for development to take their music further. All groups that perform will also be considered for other opportunities such as the Music for Youth Proms at the Royal Albert Hall in November 2017.

We will be confirming panels, workshops and sessions to get involved with on the day shortly, so sign up and stay tuned!

Sign up for performance opportunities (deadline of 1st May 2017) or register for the day by visiting: www.mfy.org.uk/exchange

For more info call Tom Spurgin 020 7759 1838 DON’T MISS THIS UNIQUE EVENT.

EXCHANGE is supported by the Scottish Government’s Youth Music Initiative (YMI) which is administered by Creative Scotland, and the Viviendi Create Joy Fund.

David McDonald Creative Consultant Mobile: 07715 976 707

Website: www.davidmcdonald.org.uk

Pre-apprenticeships set Craigroyston pupils on the right career path⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

A unique partnership between an Edinburgh secondary school, and a number of local employers from across the city has received special recognition from the Scottish Qualifications Authority.

The Pre-Apprenticeship Programme delivered by staff at Craigroyston Community High School in the north of Edinburgh sees a number of the school’s senior pupils embark upon year-long structured work experience placements with local businesses. While on placements for two afternoons a week, the pupils continue to study for Highers, Nationals, and other awards at school, but combine this with working towards industry recognised vocational qualifications. And once they have successfully completed their placements, the pupils go on to a guaranteed full-time Modern Apprenticeship with their prospective employer. 

The scheme was first introduced in 2015, following a meeting between the school’s head teacher, Steve Ross, and Robert Allan, director of HR at Apex Hotels. In its first year, nine pupils went down the pre-apprenticeship route, taking up roles in the hospitality sector with Apex Hotels, Novotel, and IBIS, and with defence engineering firm, Leonardo. This year more employers, including Charlie Miller Hairdressing, and Robertson Construction have encouraged a fourfold increase in uptake, as 36 pupils began new placements.

The stay-on rate for senior pupils at Craigroyston has increased dramatically as a result of the scheme. The number of pupils now staying on from S4 to S5 has grown from 50% in 2014/15 to 90% in 2016/17, while the S6 intake has doubled over the same period.

 The scheme has been so successful it was highly commended at the SQA Star Awards, lifting a trophy for Promoting Inclusion.

Speaking about his ambitions for the pupils, Craigroyston head teacher Steve Ross, said: “I want to encourage every pupil in the school to stay on until the end of sixth year, so when they leave they do so with a portfolio of qualifications, experiences, skills, and a knowledge of the job market that will help them find a positive destination.”

Pre-Apprenticeship co-ordinator Elaine Gray, head of home economics at the school, worked closely with Danielle Ramsay, Group Recruitment Manager at Apex Hotels, to design the content of the programme. Elaine said that the success of the scheme is down to the close relationship fostered between the school, and the employers. The model they developed has since been rolled out to all the participating employers.

Elaine added: “The partnership between the school and the employer is really important. We have to set the right expectations for the pre-apprentices and help them understand what their employers expect from them. This might include helping them with things like time management, and attendance, but equally the employers must have realistic expectations of the pupils.  However, once we get them through the door, and we can see that relationship begin, we can see the pupils start to flourish as their confidence grows and they begin to realise what they are capable of.”

Danielle Ramsay said: “We work with the pupils to help them take the first steps in the work place, supporting them with their applications, and helping them with their interviews. The benefit in the long term for us as an employer is we get to invest in the pre-apprentices for a year and introduce them to the way we work. That means that when they start their Modern Apprenticeship, they are familiar with the company, our culture, and what we expect from them, meaning they are more likely to succeed.”

Speaking about the value of the pre-apprenticeship programme, Theresa McGowan, SQA regional manager for Edinburgh, said: “The approach the team at Craigroyston has taken was tailored specifically for the needs of their pupils, and their local community, but it is a model that could be replicated elsewhere. The positive relationships between the school and employers across the city are delivering real results for the pupils, and they are really benefitting from the opportunity to complete the additional work-experience and vocational qualifications.”

For more information about how SQA supports Modern Apprenticeships and other training opportunities, visit www.sqa.org.uk/appenticeships.

Children and Young People’s Cabinet Meeting⤴

from @ Engage for Education

Last week I chaired our first annual meeting of Cabinet Ministers with children and young people at Bute House.

Four Members of the Children’s Parliament (MCPs) and ten Members of the Scottish Youth Parliament (MSYPs) spoke to us about the issues that are important to children and young people in Scotland today.

The children and young people all spoke eloquently and compassionately about their views on key issues. I was extremely impressed and inspired by their enthusiasm and commitment and it gives me great confidence in the future of Scotland.

The MCPs showed an excellent film that they had co-produced, which highlighted four key issues for children – school and teachers; feeling safe in the community; bullying; and what children need.

The MSYPs then presented the key issues for young people, which were “Lead the Way” (SYP manifesto); Children and young people’s rights in Scotland; “Speak Your Mind” campaign on mental health; and the future of Scotland’s relationship with Europe.

 

Cabinet Ministers then took part in a discussion with the children and young people around the issues they had raised. We agreed to hold this event annually and also recognised the importance of involving children and young people on an ongoing basis in policy development. We also acknowledged the importance of listening to and respecting children and young people.

 

A number of specific issues were also raised and we will explore how best to take these forward.

 

This government is committed to meaningfully and credibly engaging with children and young people at a national level and ensuring they are at the heart of decisions which affect them, with the aim of improving policy development and implementation.

 

It is important that we take the time to listen to children and young people and give them the opportunity to participate in, and influence, local and national activities and decisions.

 

Events like this support the development of a more coordinated, systematic and sustainable approach to engaging with children and young people and to inform the government’s agenda over the coming year.

It builds on previous Ministerial engagement with children and young people, such as the children and young people’s regional summits in 2015, which contributed to the Year of Young People 2018 agenda and Fairer Scotland.

 

The post Children and Young People’s Cabinet Meeting appeared first on Engage for Education.

Tackling Sectarianism Resources⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The Scottish Government and  Education Scotland are hosting the launch of a free suite of anti-sectarianism learning and teaching resources for children and young people. The launch will be opened by the Scottish Government Minister for Community Safety and Legal Affairs, Annabelle Ewing, in Stirling on the 22 Febuary 2017. Throughout the day detailed information about these resources and how they can be best deployed will be presented by a range of education practitioners. There will also be opportunities for you to explore the resources. Reserve your place.

Higher Education in the USA – “taster” opportunity⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The Sutton Trust U.S. Program is now open for applications for Summer 2017.

This program provides high-achieving, state school students with a taste of life at a top American university. Focusing on social mobility, the Sutton Trust U.S. Program is aimed at students from low or middle income families who would be the first in their family to go to university. The initiative is centred on a one-week summer school at a leading American university, with introductory events and application support in the UK before and after. Previous host campuses have included Harvard, Yale, and MIT.

The Sutton Trust is looking for S5 students who earned six or more As or Bs in their S4 qualifications, or close to this. If you know a student who fits the criteria for this program, please encourage them to visit the Sutton Trust’s website at http://us.suttontrust.com/ and apply!
The deadline for student applications is Sunday, January 22, 2017. Please get your students to check the requirements on the Sutton Trust website closely to confirm they are eligible to apply.

This exchange program can be life-changing, with many Scottish students going on to study at U.S. universities over the past few years.

Higher Education in the USA – “taster” opportunity⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The Sutton Trust U.S. Program is now open for applications for Summer 2017.

This program provides high-achieving, state school students with a taste of life at a top American university. Focusing on social mobility, the Sutton Trust U.S. Program is aimed at students from low or middle income families who would be the first in their family to go to university. The initiative is centred on a one-week summer school at a leading American university, with introductory events and application support in the UK before and after. Previous host campuses have included Harvard, Yale, and MIT.

The Sutton Trust is looking for S5 students who earned six or more As or Bs in their S4 qualifications, or close to this. If you know a student who fits the criteria for this program, please encourage them to visit the Sutton Trust’s website at http://us.suttontrust.com/ and apply!
The deadline for student applications is Sunday, January 22, 2017. Please get your students to check the requirements on the Sutton Trust website closely to confirm they are eligible to apply.

This exchange program can be life-changing, with many Scottish students going on to study at U.S. universities over the past few years.

John Muir Award activity with schools 2015-2016⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

john_muir_way_scotland_10-12-2006The John Muir Award is used to help deliver Curriculum for Excellence outcomes and demonstrates Learning for Sustainability in action. It involves pupils taking responsibility for nature (in school grounds and communities), helps establish aspirations for healthy behaviour, and improves wellbeing in line with Scottish Government SHANARRI indicators. Such activity helps foster a culture of achievement in schools – building essential skills for life, learning and work, and raising attainment for all.

During 2015-2016:

  •  445 schools were involved in delivering the John Muir Award in Scotland (this includes 45% of Secondary Schools, 12% of Primary Schools and 13% of Special Schools)
  •  15,858 Awards were achieved by pupils and staff (15% increase on 2014-15)
  •  3,362 Awards (21%) were achieved by pupils who experience some form of disadvantage

For full report with breakdown of each local authority  see here

Helping you to help pupils make subject to career connections⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

sharon-orourkeSharon O’Rourke, Skills Development Scotland

Helping young people make connections between what they are learning in classrooms and the world of work they’ll enter when they leave school has been brought into sharp focus by Building the Curriculum 4, the Career Education Standard and of course, Developing the Young Workforce.

Embedding career information and advice web service My World of Work into lessons, using SDS’s newly developed ‘lesson inserts’, is our way of helping you to make that connection for young people without needing to be a career expert yourself.

What are lesson inserts?

Lesson inserts are our answer to the common pupil question ‘why are we doing this?’

Co-created with teachers, for teachers, these are short, easy-to-use and adaptable activities, linking curriculum topics to careers by using the wealth of information on My World of Work.

The lesson inserts use the ‘plan on a page’ format. All essential information is in one place, brief and to the point, so you don’t need a lot of preparation time to use them; just pick it up and it’s ready to go. They are also flexible enough for teachers to expand or shorten the activities to meet the needs of their lesson.

How it works in practice

The short activities set out a range of ways to help young people make career connections.

These could be links to a job profile or film lasting only a few minutes featuring a person working in a certain career. For example during a biology lesson on dissection, a link to the job profile for a pathologist has a handy video showing the job in action.

Alternatively, individual or group exercises can encourage deeper careers research by perhaps asking pupils to complete a quiz or worksheet which requires searching My World of Work for the answers.

Or perhaps the activity might be given as homework to pupils to research jobs on My World of Work that are related to your subject with an action to discuss any common skills across them all in your next lesson.

At Whitburn Academy, Computing Science teachers are using the lesson inserts to show pupils and their parents how vital the subject is across a variety of careers. They are designing activities that mix careers research with practical programming activities to show the link to modern day jobs, such as Web or Games design, as well as the part programming plays in more traditional trades, such as electrician. This encourages young people to understand the breadth of opportunity their subject offers.  The teachers used the subject choice tool to research careers information for their lesson inserts, which they said increased their confidence to promote the subject in school and at parents’ evenings.

Keeping it current

As you know, My World of Work is part of the range of support on offer from Skills Development Scotland.

The information it holds is regularly updated, ensuring pupils are always accessing the most up-to-date information possible.

Using links to My World of Work helps young people develop career management skills and widens their career horizons as they become more informed about the career choices available to them.

Using My World of Work also provides the opportunity for teachers to build their career intelligence, whilst increasing their knowledge of what’s available on the site from the perspective, not just of a teacher, but as an individual, and perhaps as a parent as well.

Get Involved

We are still early in the process of creating lesson inserts, and are keen to work with teachers across all subjects to create more.

Examples of the lesson inserts that have recently been developed with teachers can be found in the partner area of My World of Work.

If you’re not registered or haven’t used the range of resources we have for teachers on My World of Work, why not sign up as a partner today and get involved?

The partner development and integration (PD&I) team at SDS are here to support you every step of the way. We really believe that these lesson inserts can be a useful, inspiring tool to support learning in your classroom.

We all want to see young people go on to successful and fulfilling careers when they leave school.

These lesson inserts are another way for us all to support them to do just that.

If you’d like to get involved email sharon.orourke@sds.co.uk

Education Governance Review – Ask The DFM⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

small-john-swinney-ed-governanceAs you may be aware the Education Governance Review is currently underway. The Deputy First Minister is hosting a Q&A session live on Glow TV for teachers to discuss the Governance Review on Tuesday 17th November at 6pm.

The Scottish Government believe that decisions about children’s learning and schools should be taken within schools themselves supported by parents and communities. If schools are to have greater control over the decisions they take, there is a clear rational to change the allocation of resources to support this. The Scottish Government will introduce a new fair and transparent needs based funding formula to make sure that resources get to the areas that need it most.

The Scottish Government recognise that there may be some functions which are best delivered at a local, regional or national level rather than at school level and that teachers and practitioners require support to do their jobs well. They want to hear your views on how all levels of our education system can be improved to support the empowered, collaborative and flexible culture which we are seeking to develop. If you are unable to attend the live session and wish a question to be asked please send it to – governacereview@gov.scot

Register now to take part live – Education Governance Review – Ask The DFM

If you unable to join us for the live event you can always catch up with the recording at another time – Glow TV’s Watch Again.