Tag Archives: Young People

Regional Working and the CLD Team⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Education Scotland has now moved to a regional delivery model and will support improvement and capacity building at local, regional and national level. CLD members are now part of Regional Teams. Each Regional team is headed up by a Senior Regional Advisor. There are six teams based on the geographies of the six Regional Collaboratives. The work of ES staff is not just limited to the RICs. All Regional teams except the Northern Team have a CLD presence. Team members will be in touch to make contact and find out about local developments.

Tayside Regional Improvement Team (Dundee, Perth and Kinross and Angus) Senior Regional Advisor (acting) –

CLD presence – Susan Epsworth, Development Officer, CLD Susan.Epsworth@educationscotland.gov.scot

South East Regional Improvement Team (Edinburgh City, Fife, Midlothian, East Lothian, Scottish Borders) Senior Regional Advisor – Alistair Brown

CLD presence – Chris Woodness, Education Officer, CLD (secondment) Vince Moore, Development Officer, CLD Vincent.Moore@educationscotland.gov.scot

South West Regional Improvement Team (Dumfries and Galloway, East Ayshire, South Ayrshire and North Ayshire) Senior Regional Advisor – Carol Copstick

CLD presence – Nicola Sykes, Senior Education Officer

Dehra Macdonald, Development Officer, CLD Dehra.Macdonald@educationscotland.gov.scot

Forth Valley and West Lothian Regional Improvement Team (Falkirk, Stirling, Clackmannanshire and West Lothian) Senior Regional Advisor – Jackie Halawi

CLD presence – Lindsay MacDonald, Education Officer, CLD Lindsay.MacDonald@educationscotland.gov.scot

Mandy Watts, Development Officer, CLD Mandy.Watts@educationscotland.gov.scot

West Regional Improvement Team (Glasgow City, East Dunbartonshire, East Renfrewshire, Inverclyde, North Lanarkshire, Renfrewshire, South Lanarkshire and West Dunbartonshire) Senior Regional Advisor – Patricia Watson

CLD presence – John Galt, Education Officer, CLD mailto:John.Galt@educationscotland.gov.scot

Laura Mcintosh, Development Officer, CLD Laura.Mcintosh@educationscotland.gov.scot

Northern Regional Improvement Team (Aberdeen City, Aberdeenshire, Moray, Argyll and Bute, Shetland Islands, Western Isles, Highland, Orkney) Senior Regional Advisor – David Gregory

DYW, helping to reshape the curriculum?⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Does Developing the Young Workforce (DYW) provide schools with a mechanism to offer a wider range of subject choices in the Senior Phase?

This key question has been discussed in TES articles over the last few months. Here are  some of the key messages, with the emphasis on DYW and it’s potential impact on the curriculum and subject choice:

Subject Choice

“Local authority education bosses have hit back at suggestions that pupils in secondary schools are seeing their options narrow. In recent months there has been a high-profile debate about the number of subjects pupils are able to study in S4, but MSPs were told today that it can be misleading to look at this issue in isolation.”

 “Mark Ratter, who heads up quality improvement and performance at East Renfrewshire Council’s education services, said that, thanks to partnerships with colleges, universities and employers, as well as the Developing the Young Workforce national policy, there was actually now “a far greater choice” in what pupils could study. In one East Renfrewshire secondary school, for example, S5-6 pupils “have a choice of over 130 different courses”.”

“Tony McDaid, South Lanarkshire Council’s executive director of education resources, said you could understand parents comparing how many subjects different schools were offering at S4 and their “natural anxiety” around that. However, they reacted well when they heard that “this is not just about your fourth year, you can do another subject when you move into fifth year”, and that there was a focus on the career a pupil was ultimately heading towards and the qualifications they would gain “across the whole senior phase” from S4-6.”

 Work-based learning

“Angus Council schools and learning director Pauline Stephen said there was “an ongoing challenge” to communicate to pupils’ families the “shifting and different” education system that pupils experience in 2019. Dr Stephen cited new types of qualifications such as Foundation Apprenticeships, which were little known outside education circles and sometimes wrongly viewed as inferior to other qualifications.

Dr Stephen said that Brechin High, for example, had worked with a local roofing business to open a construction centre at the school, which “allows us to offer qualifications alongside an employer in partnership – it’s been really successful”.”

Developing the Young Workforce

“DYW is a ‘game-changer’ – and it has Curriculum for Education to thank for that”

“It’s a potentially misleading debate, however. The supposed narrowing of the curriculum is concerned with subject choices in the senior phase. Setting aside arguments about the extent to which this is happening, there’s a basic flaw in the reasoning: by looking only at subject choices – largely at National 5 and Higher – it misses what appears to be a widening of the curriculum in other ways.

 “This fixation with exams and academic subjects – plus ça change – ignores the fact that, in many schools, there is now a much richer range of opportunities. Last week, for example, I visited a secondary with a spaghetti junction of pathways for its senior pupils – where apprenticeships and college courses truly do have “parity of esteem” with university, to use the jargon – and a determination to bend the curriculum to individual aspirations. If that means pupils going to another school for a certain Advanced Higher or spending some of the week in college, or teachers setting up a work placement with an employer they’ve not dealt with before, then the school’s attitude is, so be it.”

 “Developing the Young Workforce may be an equally uninspiring, chosen-by-committee title. But whereas CfE is typically viewed as falling short, the reaction to DYW – a far newer kid on the block – feels very different. Visiting schools, I’ve been struck by how often it’s cited as a positive influence, a driver of cultural change that has gone beyond its initial promise to boost vocational education. For example, one special school depute head said that, while she wasn’t sure those behind DYW were really thinking of her sector, it was a “game-changer”, helping to create work and training opportunities for school-leavers with complex needs.”

Head teachers and the curriculum

“We are free to shape the curriculum,’ say Scottish heads”

“An investigation into whether Scottish headteachers have the freedom to tailor their school’s curriculum to the needs of their pupils has found that “almost all” heads believe they have that power.”

 “It adds that heads were, in most cases, “well supported” by their local authorities and “empowered to work with staff, pupils, parents and wider partners to design learner pathways which best suit the needs of their local community”.

 “It adds: “Most are taking account of Developing the Young Workforce (DYW) to deliver a curriculum which includes an understanding of the world of work and vocational pathways. However, there continues to be a need to increase progress in delivering DYW priorities and ensure that pupils and parents are aware of the range of vocational options and pathways available.”

I have added links to the full articles but free registration  is required for full access:

Pupils’ study choices expanding, not narrowing, say education bosses

Developing the Young Workforce will define Scottish education

We are free to shape the curriculum,’ say Scottish heads

 

TEDx Glasgow 2019: Ideas worth doing⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Here is your opportunity to host a TEDxGlasgow livestream! The livestream will take place on the 14th of June between 9:15am and 3pm and will be hosted on YouTube. We have developed this toolkit as a handy guide with all the information you need to help with your livestream event including information on the tech specs required to host a livestream event; the rules around hosting; your role; the programme for the event and some FAQs.

TEDxGlasgow 2019 Livestream Toolkit

This year our theme is: Connection Whether it’s making them, breaking them, discovering them or searching for them, connections have shaped, and continue to shape, the world we live in. With the rapid advancements in technology, our world is more connected than it has ever been – physically, emotionally, digitally, scientifically and even metaphorically. Or is it?

The team at TEDxGlasgow focus on the TED ethos of sharing ideas, spreading knowledge, and supporting our community to translate this into bold, brave actions. Everything we do is attuned to generating a positive impact.

Gurjit Singh Lalli, shares his perspectives:

“What makes Glasgow unique are the people and their can-do spirit which is intoxicating.  Scotland has growth in both businesses and entrepreneurs who are focused, not only on profit, but making a positive social impact, which aligns to a passion of my own. I aspire for a future where companies compete on the amount of good they do through positive change and social initiatives; the TEDxGlasgow event is a platform that will strive to continue inspiring an atmosphere, both locally and nationally, where this can happen”

Creating a legacy through Ideas Worth Doing

Being involved with TEDxGlasgow offers partners, delegates, speakers and volunteers a unique opportunity to contribute to powerful conversations.  Either at our events or online, our talks have been seen by millions of people, and we’re passionate about supporting actions on ideas that matter.  We asked Pauline Houston, our Head of events shares her thoughts:

“Partnering with the right individuals and businesses can have an incredible impact on your organisation, and we’ve been fortunate to have great people behind our mission and events. I am proud of the fantastic reputation that Scotland has globally from passionate companies, ready to speak up and challenge ideas as they do with us at TEDxGlasgow, and look forward to driving more positive impact from continued collaboration in new ways” 

Researching the Impact of ideas

Our events provide a medium that combines a diverse range of people –  thinkers, doers and innovators coming together, ready to be challenged.  Designing a framework to measure outcomes from an event as unique as TEDxGlasgow has been an exciting experience, as well as an opportunity to hear directly from a wide range of individuals and organisations with amazing stories to share.  Zebunisa Ahmed, our Impact Lead offers her insights:

“Both as a volunteer and through a career in data visualisation, I’m driven by seeing how good ideas can make a difference if given a chance  – be that on an individual basis, organisationally or throughout society. As a team we want to inspire meaningful change, and I believe that good ideas can be vector for positive impact, spreading far beyond the event; it all starts with a conversation.”

The impact team get creative when measuring outcomes from the event and are keen to capture examples of the TEDx Glasgow community taking action, as seen in our impact report. We will continue monitoring how our ideas shared translate into actions with positive outcomes, and invite you to share your examples – the more personal or creative, the more we love hearing from you.

 

Guest blog from Maths Olympiad Agnijo Banerjee⤴

from @ Engage for Education

As Maths Week 2018 draws to a close, we welcome a guest blog from Maths Olympiad Agnijo Banerjee.

Agnijo won gold at this year’s International Mathematical Olympiad in Romania receiving a perfect score of 42 out of 42 in the 2-day/nine hour-long competition, he was one of only two out of 594 contestants to achieve a perfect score. This was the UK’s first perfect score in 24 years. A truly remarkable achievement.

Last week Agnijo met the Deputy First Minister for lunch at Holyrood, after which he reflected on his achievement at the Olympiad and his hopes for the future.

I knew I had a passion for mathematics from a very early age. In primary school, I was always moved up several years until eventually they contacted Grove Academy and I ended up going there for maths. I was taught one-to-one by one of the maths teachers from Grove Academy and I did my Standard Grade in Primary 7.

Grove Academy has been extremely supportive of me throughout, and has always ensured that I am adequately challenged. In the last two years of school, I went to Dundee University to try some of their modules (third year in S5, fifth year in S6).

Grove Academy has also encouraged me to take part in a number of mathematics competitions and I have been doing the British Mathematical Olympiad ever since S2. The British Mathematical Olympiad is part of the long selection process that ultimately leads to the International Mathematical Olympiad, which I did this year .

It was a wonderful experience to go to the International Mathematical Olympiad. The actual competition was over two days. On each day there were 3 questions to solve in 4 1/2 hours, with the first question on each day being “easy” (they are all extremely difficult, but these were easy relative to the others), the second being “medium”, and the third being “hard”. The two hard questions were extremely difficult but I managed to solve both of them. It was amazing to be the first UK contestant in 24 years to achieve a perfect score. ie 100%.

It was a great honour to meet the Scotland’s Education Minister Mr. John Swinney . I was invited to Holyrood to meet him during the Scottish Maths Week. I was very pleasantly surprised when he took a keen interest and asked me questions about the IMO and my other academic achievements. I felt greatly motivated by being recognised by the minister. I presented him a copy of my book Weird Maths , which hopefully he will enjoy reading.

In the future I want to reach the top of my chosen field- Mathematics and hope to able to make Scotland proud.

Reflecting on his meeting with Agnijo, Deputy First Minister, John Swinney, said:

“It was a pleasure to meet Agnijo and his father today and Maths Week Scotland 2018 is the perfect opportunity to celebrate his astonishing achievements in the Maths Olympiad.

“Agnijo is a credit to Grove Academy and a shining example of how Scotland’s state school education can nurture ability and help talent flourish.

“We need to make sure that as a country we have all of the skills that we require for the future and in schools we need to ensure that young people are equipped with the skills that will serve them well for life.”

The post Guest blog from Maths Olympiad Agnijo Banerjee appeared first on Engage for Education.

Enigma legacy lives on in codebreaking challenges⤴

from @ Engage for Education

More than 70 years after Alan Turing and his colleagues cracked the Enigma code, helping to save many millions of lives during World War II, their story remains an inspiration to budding mathematicians around the world.

Throughout Maths Week Scotland students in Angus will be given the chance to step into Turing’s famous shoes and learn more about his team’s vital work.

Practical workshops run by the education team from Bletchley Park will test their problem solving skills and show them the fundamentals of codebreaking. Students will also have the rare opportunity to see a real, working Enigma machine.

Speaking after meeting students involved in one of the workshops at Monifieth High School, Science Minister Richard Lochhead said:

“From cyber security to artificial intelligence, maths provides the essential framework for the life-changing advances that are re-shaping our world.

 “Technology has clearly developed considerably since the 1940s but today’s event was a reminder that the logical and computational thinking processes used by the original Bletchley Park codebreakers are now more relevant than ever.

“It was fantastic to have the opportunity so see an original Enigma machine in action and hear how maths provided the vital framework for cracking the code while providing a fun and interesting way to learn maths. 

“As we face the digital challenges of the 21st century there are countless opportunities for young people with maths skills. I hope Maths Week Scotland will help to spread that message and encourage more people to think positively about maths.”

Hundreds of events, activities and lectures are taking place across the country this week as part of Maths Week Scotland 2018. Join the conversation on Twitter with #MathsWeekScot

The post Enigma legacy lives on in codebreaking challenges appeared first on Engage for Education.

Numbers add up as Maths Week kicks off with hundreds of events⤴

from @ Engage for Education

A maths magician, a guitar physicist and a codebreaking team from Bletchley Park are among the highlights of Maths Week Scotland, which starts across the country today.

There are hundreds of events, activities and lectures lined up with the aim of bringing numeracy to life and showing the fun side of maths.

Deputy First Minister John Swinney will share a new maths challenge on Twitter every day, created for him by the Scottish Mathematical Council, and BBC Learning have teamed up with Scottish Teacher of the Year Chris Smith to create videos demonstrating how to solve the puzzles.

Mr Swinney said:

“Maths is an essential life skill for everyone to use, enjoy and to be successful – it underpins all aspects of life. Raising awareness about the importance and relevance of maths is vital – particularly as our society is becoming increasingly underpinned by data analysis, science and technology.

“Undoubtedly maths provides the framework for life-changing advances in all of these fields and celebrations like Maths Week Scotland challenge misconceptions and negative attitudes that discourage learners by demonstrating the accessibility, relevance and beauty of maths.

“Maths Week is at the heart of our drive to make Scotland more positive in its attitude towards numeracy and maths. Whether you’re a maths whizz, or haven’t thought about it since your last lesson at school, there is something for everyone, with hundreds of events covering all parts of Scotland, all ages and all sectors of society. I’m looking forward to visiting schools taking part this week and getting involved in the celebrations.”

Excellence and equity in maths and numeracy attainment is central to the Scottish Government’s ambition for continuous improvement in education and to close the poverty-related attainment gap. 

Programme highlights:

 ·         The Bletchley Park Education team visiting all secondary schools in Angus to explore maths and code breaking during the Week.

·         Maths ‘magician’ Kjartan Poskitt performing in primary schools in Wick, Thurso, Shetland and Orkney (as well as Orkney Library and Orkney Science Festival).

·         Maths performer Andrew Jeffrey performing in secondary schools in Perth, Pitlochry, Kingussie and Inverness.

·         An event for S5 girls in Edinburgh on the importance of maths from Heriot Watt and Edinburgh Universities and the International Centre for Mathematical Studies.

·         A Maths Circle for children, families and young people at Edinburgh University on Saturday 15 September.

·         The UK Mathematical Trust 2-day maths event for secondary pupils in partnership with Strathclyde University.

·         The Strathclyde Science Scouts will be visiting schools during the week for maths games and adventures.

·         The University of Glasgow have created a day of maths activities and talks activities for s3-6 pupils to attend.

·         Learning Links and Heather Reid will present to adult education practitioners at Glasgow Science Centre on exploring climate change using numbers and maths.

·         Heriot Watt University are holding a session on the Maths of Social Media for higher and advanced higher pupils.

·         The West Partnership are holding a numeracy and maths all-day staff conference to launch Maths Week on Saturday 8 September.  It’s fully booked.

·         University of Edinburgh are hosting an evening event for maths teachers with a range of speakers including Scottish Teacher of the Year 2018 Chris Smith and the Deputy First Minister and Cabinet Secretary for Education and Skills, John Swinney MSP.

·         St Andrews University are giving lectures in 3 local schools and will also be hosting a viewing of their special collection of ancient mathematical texts and pairing this with a lecture. 

·         Dr Emily Grossman, an expert in molecular biology and genetics, will visit Grange Academy in Kilmarnock to inspire a group of S3 students about the exciting opportunities for young people (and especially girls) following careers in Maths and Science.

·         The National Museum have built maths into their solar and wind power workshop for p5-7 pupils and created an associated maths resource for teachers.

The post Numbers add up as Maths Week kicks off with hundreds of events appeared first on Engage for Education.

YouthLink Scotland Policy Seminar – Digital Youth Work and Cyber Resilience⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

YouthLink Scotland would like to invite you to join them for their policy seminar on digital youth work and cyber resilience on 27th September 2018 in Edinburgh.

There will be an amazing line up of speakers, including David McNeill (SCVO), Suvi Tuominen (VERKE, Finland’s National Development Centre for Digital Youth Work), and 5Rights Ambassadors – as well as youth worker Darran Gillan (YMCA) sharing his approach to digital youth work, and Rural Youth Project co-founder Rebecca Dawes talking about international rural youth vlogging and blogging.

Some of the key questions that the seminar will address include:

  • Are young people really ‘digital natives?’
  • Are youth workers equipped and ready to support young people to navigate this changing ‘digital’ world, to realise their potential and address new challenges?
  • Do we still deliver youth work services in the same way we always have?

The seminar will also include some brand new films from the EU Digital Youth Work project.

Booking information can be found here.

First Minister’s Question Time – participation project⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

National charity Children in Scotland and national agency for youth work YouthLink Scotland are developing an exciting new participation project, First Minister’s Question Time (FMQT), which will launch later this year. It aims to empower children and young people, particularly those too young to have a vote or whose voices are seldom heard, to express their views, opinions and needs directly to Scotland’s leaders.

 

As part of planning for the first FMQT event, Children in Scotland and YouthLink Scotland will be contacting schools in June and asking young people to submit questions. An education resource linked to the project is also being developed which will be shared with schools.

 

If you are interested in hearing more about the project and would like to be sent further information, please email: info@youthlinkscotland.org or info@childreninscotland.org.uk with ‘FMQT project’ in the subject line.

#IsThisOk?⤴

from @ Engage for Education

Yesterday, Further and Higher Education Minister Shirley-Anne Somerville visited the University of Stirling to learn more about a joint initiative between the University and Student’s Union to combat sexual violence and misconduct.

Here Jill Stevenson, Head of Student Support Services at the University, sets out how partnership working has been critical to the initiative’s success.

OVER the past two-and-a-half years, staff and students at the University of Stirling have been working closely together to develop and implement a joint strategy to prevent and tackle sexual violence and misconduct. It is characterised by the principles of collaboration, prevention and shared ownership for a culture of respectful, healthy relationships in our community.

Back in 2015, a group of students and Gender Studies staff jointly hosted a screening of the US documentary, The Hunting Ground, which sparked a series of discussions between senior University staff and students about sexual violence in universities. Following those discussions, a strong commitment to jointly take action at Stirling emerged.

Following several months of development and consultation with staff and students, and engagement with a wide range of partners including Rape Crisis Forth Valley, Police Scotland, Stirling & District Women’s Aid, the local Gender Based Violence Partnership and the National Rape Task Force, our joint strategy was launched to more than 100 guests in December 2017 by our Principal, Professor Gerry McCormac, and former Students’ Union President, Dave Keenan, with contributions from a range of external partners.

The strategy commits both organisations to “take all steps within their power to prevent, tackle and respond appropriately and supportively to incidents of sexual violence or misconduct – in all its forms – that may affect our students, staff and those who use our facilities and services.” To achieve this aim, we aspire to achieve four key objectives:

  • Foster a culture where sexual violence, harassment and other forms of sexual misconduct are not tolerated and are actively challenged
  • Ensure that our staff and students are clear about their options and receive appropriate support if they are a victim-survivor of sexual misconduct
  • Ensure University and Students’ Union staff and officers are clear about how to respond to and support students or colleagues if they have been affected by sexual violence or misconduct; and
  • Improve our knowledge and understanding about the prevalence of – and impact of our work to prevent and tackle – sexual misconduct in our community

We didn’t develop this strategy because we think there is a particular issue with sexual violence at the University of Stirling: research shows unequivocally that issues of gender based and sexual violence are pervasive throughout society. However, we recognise the powerful role that the University has as an employer, an educator, and a supporter of thousands of students, many of whom are or will go on to become the influencers and leaders of future society. We feel that we have a responsibility and a unique position to create dialogue and critical thinking about these issues amongst our University community, and to make a tangible difference to society.

Since we launched the strategy, we’ve been working hard. Some of our achievements so far include:

  • The launch of a dedicated microsite, which contains key information on sexual violence and consent, the law in Scotland, options for survivors, support available at the University and provided by partners, and guidance for those who are supporting a student, colleague or friend who has been affected.
  • The launch of our multiple award winning awareness-raising campaign #IsThisOk which seeks to raise awareness of sexual violence and encourages everyone to challenge their own assumptions and take steps to prevent and tackle sexual and gender based violence
  • The development of clear guidance on what to do if you or a friend has been affected by sexual violence
  • A comprehensive training programme for staff and students, which is now being built into induction processes
  • Creation of a 12-strong Sexual Violence & Misconduct Liaison Officer (SVMLO) network; a group of staff who are intensively trained to respond to disclosures and provide guidance to anyone affected by sexual violence

Over the coming year, we’ll be taking further action, including:

  • New mechanisms to make reporting easier, including a new online reporting tool
  • Research into the experiences of those who have received a disclosure of sexual violence or misconduct at the University
  • The development of a network of student #IsThisOk workshop facilitators, who will lead conversations about sexual violence with other students across the University
  • Continued close work with our partners, including further dialogue with the Scottish Government and other universities to identify ways we can collaborate further

We are very proud of the work that’s happening at the University of Stirling to encourage everyone to ask #IsThisOk and to take action if not. We are starting to see the impact of our work and we look forward to continuing to work with our partners to make our society a safer and better place for everyone.

Jill Stevenson, Head of Student Support Services, University of Stirling

The post #IsThisOk? appeared first on Engage for Education.

CLD Meetings and events updates⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

CLD Standards Council

The CLD Standards Council held a successful conference with over 180 members participating actively in a wide variety of workshops with a professional learning focus across a wide spectrum of CLD practice. For more information about their work, visit their website: http://cldstandardscouncil.org.uk/

CLD and STEM

Education Scotland met with colleagues from the Science Centres and Festivals to discuss STEM actions in relation to CLD. We are currently undertaking an audit of science centre and CLD STEM engagement. This information will give a baseline of current activity. Further discussions will take place with CLD, Education Scotland, Scottish Government and Science Centres and Festivals to identify priorities and begin to produce STEM Community Plans.

Newbattle Abbey Adult Learning Conference

The fifth Adult Learning Conference took place in Newbattle Abbey College on the 24th April and delegates came from local authorities, colleges, National Organisations, Higher Education and the Third Sector.  Shirley- Anne Somerville,  Minister for Further Education, Higher Education and Science delivered the Keynote Address and announced grant support from Education Scotland for the Adult Achievement Awards. Joan MacKay, Assistant Director, Education Scotland, invited the audience to help shape the CLD offer in the light of Education Scotland’s new National and Regional responsibilities. Adult Guidance was the theme of the

conference, introduced by Marian Docherty, Principal of Newbattle Abbey College and there were two powerful testimonies from adult learners about their learner journeys and the importance of adult guidance in shaping their futures. Conference delegates agreed recommendations for actions to develop Adult Guidance in Scotland. This Action Plan will be sent to Ms Somerville and the National Strategic Forum for Adult Learning will implement the recommendations once approved by the Minister.

National Youth Work Strategy

The National Youth Work Strategy Group met on 2 May at Youthlink. Key themes arising were how to build on the legacy work of the YOYP and ensure that the new Strategy was reflective of young people’s aspirations and how to make use of evidence from the GUS research to help inform the new Strategy and build a strong evidence base for the future.

Languages in FE and ESOL Practitioner Professional Learning Network

The second meeting of the steering group for the Languages in FE and ESOL Practitioner Professional Learning Network took place at the end of April. This network is being supported by a partnership between the College Development Network, Education Scotland and Scotland’s Centre for Languages.

The Languages and ESOL network supports the learning and teaching of all languages and cultures. Its purpose is to be a national voice for languages and ESOL within FE and the wider community, and to provide a platform for sharing and developing practice in its widest sense. For more information about the work of the steering group, please contact Mandy Watts.

National Strategic Forum for Adult Learning in Scotland Learner Voice Working Group

The National Strategic Forum for Adult Learning is chaired by Education Scotland. The new Learner Voice Pack contains information on the work of this strategic group and case studies from Glasgow Women’s Library, Scottish Book Trust, Stirling Council, Crisis Skylight Edinburgh, Scottish Borders CLD, East Renfrewshire Council, Age Scotland, Airdrie Adult Learners’ Forum  and West Dunbartonshire Learners’ Voice. It is accessible now from the CPD Forum page of i-develop. It will be formally launched at Learning Link Scotland on the 15th May.