Tag Archives: web2.0

Realising the Benefits⤴

from @ eCurriculum Blog

The previous post of images from our recent conference uses a number of web2.0 technologies. Practice what we preach is the mantra in our office and I'm rather pleased with myself having uploaded to Flickr and embeded the slide show in my Blog. It's a slick way of doing things and means that our collection of images can be used in a variety of different ways. Hope you enjoy them.

Realising the Benefits⤴

from @ eCurriculum Blog

The previous post of images from our recent conference uses a number of web2.0 technologies. Practice what we preach is the mantra in our office and I'm rather pleased with myself having uploaded to Flickr and embeded the slide show in my Blog. It's a slick way of doing things and means that our collection of images can be used in a variety of different ways. Hope you enjoy them.

Creative Commons – The answer to our Copyright prayers?⤴

from @ eCurriculum Blog

While delivering a briefing on copyright recently I realised that copyright had not featured on my Blog. The danger when talking to staff about copyright issues associated with digital resources is that in effect you cannot copy and paste anything from the Internet without breaching copyright law. Case closed - and that's not what staff want to hear!

Our approach here at the RSC however is to focus on how you can find resources that you are at liberty to use. Creative  Commons (CC) is a not for profit corporation dedicated to making it easier for people to share and build upon the work of others, consistent with ccthe rules of copyright and for me has become the most useful tool to use to help find materials that you can use. Essentially Creative Commons allows you to assign usage rights to your work before it is published indicating how your work can be used. Unless this, or something similar, is done the default position is that the work is copyright as soon as it is published to the web.

Google (for websites) and Flickr (for images) now have advance search tools which allow you to filter your search to resources which have a Creative Commons licence already assigned. You should click on the CC icon and read the licence but really all 4 licences do tend to cover use in the mainstream, non-commercial education sectors with just a simple attribution note.

Advanced search in Google:click advanced search / enter your search term / expand date and usage rights section / choose one of the 4 appropriate usage terms that suits you needs. All 4 reflect the CC licences.

Advanced search in Flickr: enter your search term / click search / then choose advance search / check box that says "Only search within Creative Commons-licensed content".

The returns you get using either of these techniques will provide you with materials that you can use without breaching the copyright legislation but you should check out the CC license terms for every resource you find.

It is worth noting that you may not be in a position to assign a creative commons licence the work you develop yourself for your students as the intellectual property rights are likely to rest with your employer. Check it out

http://creativecommons.org/

How Creative Commons works

JISC Legal Webcast on “Digital Copyright with Confidence

Creative Commons – The answer to our Copyright prayers?⤴

from @ eCurriculum Blog

While delivering a briefing on copyright recently I realised that copyright had not featured on my Blog. The danger when talking to staff about copyright issues associated with digital resources is that in effect you cannot copy and paste anything from the Internet without breaching copyright law. Case closed - and that's not what staff want to hear!

Our approach here at the RSC however is to focus on how you can find resources that you are at liberty to use. Creative  Commons (CC) is a not for profit corporation dedicated to making it easier for people to share and build upon the work of others, consistent with ccthe rules of copyright and for me has become the most useful tool to use to help find materials that you can use. Essentially Creative Commons allows you to assign usage rights to your work before it is published indicating how your work can be used. Unless this, or something similar, is done the default position is that the work is copyright as soon as it is published to the web.

Google (for websites) and Flickr (for images) now have advance search tools which allow you to filter your search to resources which have a Creative Commons licence already assigned. You should click on the CC icon and read the licence but really all 4 licences do tend to cover use in the mainstream, non-commercial education sectors with just a simple attribution note.

Advanced search in Google:click advanced search / enter your search term / expand date and usage rights section / choose one of the 4 appropriate usage terms that suits you needs. All 4 reflect the CC licences.

Advanced search in Flickr: enter your search term / click search / then choose advance search / check box that says "Only search within Creative Commons-licensed content".

The returns you get using either of these techniques will provide you with materials that you can use without breaching the copyright legislation but you should check out the CC license terms for every resource you find.

It is worth noting that you may not be in a position to assign a creative commons licence the work you develop yourself for your students as the intellectual property rights are likely to rest with your employer. Check it out

http://creativecommons.org/

How Creative Commons works

JISC Legal Webcast on “Digital Copyright with Confidence

Using Blogs for e-Assessment⤴

from @ eCurriculum Blog

As with many Web2.0 tools the emphasis on communication and collaboration means that many types of social software are becoming recognised as valuable learning tools that can be particularly useful to assess contributions of individual learners to group outcomes. Blogs can be used in this manner and have the potential to become powerful tools to provide evidence of deep learning and reflection.

Community blogs can be used to document progress towards the completion of a group task and the chronological aspects of the software are helpful in monitoring progress, achievement and contributions. Consideration of the extent to which authentication is required and indeed how it's managed will determine how this type of software is deployed within an institution.

blog Blogs provide an  ideal solution when the documentation of learning processes is needed, often a challenge for institutions and potentially quite "high risk" in terms of moderation and verification.  As with other social software the "signing in" requirements mean that activities are well documented and can be monitored relatively easily. Comment facilities provide a mechanism for peer assessment - provided good guidelines and support for the whole process is in place.

Blogs can be used as a journal and to assist personal development planning, documenting progress towards the achievement of goals. Staff at Dumfries and Galloway College are using Blogging software in quite a structured way very effectively with learners to encourage reflection and document progress. The ability to easily upload multimedia to web-based applications is of great value in many areas of the curriculum e.g. hairdressing students can take images of both the end result and also the processes that were involved. This could be applied in the same way in food production or the construction trades.

Balancing the need for structure (to ensure performance criteria is met) and learner autonomy is a challenge for institutions. It is argued greater structure undermines the authenticity of postings and can compromise the opportunities for deep learning that Blogs can offer. It can't be denied though that using technology seems to be more attractive to learners than putting pen to paper. Perhaps in the Further Education sector providing structure is an essential ingredient if the attractions of web 2.0 technologies are to be exploited and potential benefits are to be maximised.

Using Blogs for e-Assessment⤴

from @ eCurriculum Blog

As with many Web2.0 tools the emphasis on communication and collaboration means that many types of social software are becoming recognised as valuable learning tools that can be particularly useful to assess contributions of individual learners to group outcomes. Blogs can be used in this manner and have the potential to become powerful tools to provide evidence of deep learning and reflection.

Community blogs can be used to document progress towards the completion of a group task and the chronological aspects of the software are helpful in monitoring progress, achievement and contributions. Consideration of the extent to which authentication is required and indeed how it's managed will determine how this type of software is deployed within an institution.

blog Blogs provide an  ideal solution when the documentation of learning processes is needed, often a challenge for institutions and potentially quite "high risk" in terms of moderation and verification.  As with other social software the "signing in" requirements mean that activities are well documented and can be monitored relatively easily. Comment facilities provide a mechanism for peer assessment - provided good guidelines and support for the whole process is in place.

Blogs can be used as a journal and to assist personal development planning, documenting progress towards the achievement of goals. Staff at Dumfries and Galloway College are using Blogging software in quite a structured way very effectively with learners to encourage reflection and document progress. The ability to easily upload multimedia to web-based applications is of great value in many areas of the curriculum e.g. hairdressing students can take images of both the end result and also the processes that were involved. This could be applied in the same way in food production or the construction trades.

Balancing the need for structure (to ensure performance criteria is met) and learner autonomy is a challenge for institutions. It is argued greater structure undermines the authenticity of postings and can compromise the opportunities for deep learning that Blogs can offer. It can't be denied though that using technology seems to be more attractive to learners than putting pen to paper. Perhaps in the Further Education sector providing structure is an essential ingredient if the attractions of web 2.0 technologies are to be exploited and potential benefits are to be maximised.

Christmas Cheer⤴

from @ eCurriculum Blog

Merry JISCmas

christmas bauble

A few websites for some Christmas fun this time:

Dvolver creates creativity widgets - software that enables people to creatively communicate using internet technologies. www.dvolver.com

NORAD Santa Tracker - It is very good this year, with educational games for younger students, plus lots of other goodies.On Christmas Eve they team up with Google Earth to track Santa as he speeds around the world delivering his presents. As he reaches places of interest there is information about the towns and Cities. http://www.northpole.com/ 

Buying a Present - One for the lads - forearmed is forewarned!http://bewareofthedoghouse.com/videoPage.aspx

Elf Yourself - For those of you who had fun a year or two ago - just to let you know The Elf back again this Christmas: http://elfyourself.jibjab.com/view/KQHtQ4ef9fWLQ9h118fI

Toondoo“ Create your own comic strips, Publish, Share & Discuss”: a creative site with a community presence, very visual, embed or link to favourites, your own or other peoples. http://www.toondoo.com

Have a happy Christmas and New Year - I'll be back blogging in 2009 - Joan

Christmas Cheer⤴

from @ eCurriculum Blog

Merry JISCmas

christmas bauble

A few websites for some Christmas fun this time:

Dvolver creates creativity widgets - software that enables people to creatively communicate using internet technologies. www.dvolver.com

NORAD Santa Tracker - It is very good this year, with educational games for younger students, plus lots of other goodies.On Christmas Eve they team up with Google Earth to track Santa as he speeds around the world delivering his presents. As he reaches places of interest there is information about the towns and Cities. http://www.northpole.com/ 

Buying a Present - One for the lads - forearmed is forewarned!http://bewareofthedoghouse.com/videoPage.aspx

Elf Yourself - For those of you who had fun a year or two ago - just to let you know The Elf back again this Christmas: http://elfyourself.jibjab.com/view/KQHtQ4ef9fWLQ9h118fI

Toondoo“ Create your own comic strips, Publish, Share & Discuss”: a creative site with a community presence, very visual, embed or link to favourites, your own or other peoples. http://www.toondoo.com

Have a happy Christmas and New Year - I'll be back blogging in 2009 - Joan