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Leadership Award for Gaelic Medium Education (GME): 1 and 2 December 2017⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Leadership is key to the success of schools to which all colleagues can contribute.

This  leadership programme aims to develop  practitioners as teacher leaders who are able to positively influence Gaelic Education within their school.  It has been developed by Social Enterprise Academy, in partnership with Education Scotland, and accredited by the Scottish College of Educational Leadership(SCEL).

Specific objectives are to:

  • apply leadership principles to the contemporary issues and challenges in Gaelic Education
  • use action learning and peer learning approaches to identify new approaches to improving  practice
  • enable educational professionals to develop reflective practice techniques to ensure their ongoing development as classroom practitioners
  • develop practitioners’ own leadership ability.

Practitioners can gain an Award in Leadership (SCQF 9) on attending the leadership programme and successfully completing a reflective assessment.  The programme, and related assessment, is delivered through the medium of Gaelic.

For more information, please contact Jessica@socialenterprise.academy.


Support for GLE and GME on Education Scotland’s online services⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

This presentation is designed to raise  practitioners’ awareness of the resources on our online services to support Gaelic Learner and Medium Education.



Children’s Rights and Learner Participation⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

There will be a day to refresh our ‘Realising and Recognising Children’s Rights’ professional learning resource which will also introduce some of the key messages in our new ‘Learner Participation in Educational Settings’ resource. We are currently recruiting schools to take part in a pilot to explore this resource. We will also be running a workshop on the resource at the Scottish Learning Festival on the 21 September 2017.

Date Event Venue Who is it for
21.9.17 Seminar at Scottish learning Festival



Scottish Exhibition Centre Education Practitioners
20.10.17 Realising and recognising children’s rights and Learner Participation Atlantic Quay, Glasgow Those with an authority wide remit in rights and participation or senior managers or those with a remit within schools.

To book a place on the October training email the Inclusion Team and put ‘Children’s Rights’ in the e-mail subject heading.  Click here to book a place at the Scottish learning festival.

Food Education News June 2017⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Please find below Food Education News for June 2017, which includes links to resources to support Food & Health as well as information about opportunities for staff and pupils.

Food Health news JUNE 2017

1.    Using food as a context to raise attainment & close the gap

Scottish Learning Festival Thursday 21st September 10.45am – 11.45am


Using exemplars from schools across Scotland, this workshop aims to empower practitioners to consider innovative and creative ways in using food as a context for promoting equity and excellence for our children and young people. Hear from teachers and      partners who have implemented and measured positive change using food at the heart of   learning.

2. Food & Health Benchmarks now published on the National Improvement Hub

Curriculum for Excellence Benchmarks

3. Progression of skills exemplar Skills at the Heart of the Curriculum

These short videos demonstrate the progression of skills in one primary setting, looking at the experience from a range of key stakeholders.

4.    BNF Health Eating Week 12 to 16 June 2017

Is your school registered for BNF Healthy Eating Week? To date, an incredible 8,038 nursery practitioners and primary/secondary teachers have registered for BNF Healthy Eating Week 2017.

Register now and you will receive a number free resources, as well as the opportunity to join in health challenges and cook-a-longs!


  1. Revised Nutritional Analysis

Guidance for schools and local authorities to demonstrate compliance with nutrient standards can be found on the National Improvement Hub.

Revised Nutritional Analysis

  1. SQA N5 course assessment changes 2017 – 2018

            Hospitality: Practical Cake Craft                http://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/56929.html

Hospitality: Practical Cookery                    http://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/47439.html

Between April and September 2017, SQA are running a programme of subject specific webinars which focus on the requirements of the revised National 5 course assessments being introduced in 2017-18.


For some subjects, SQA are publishing audio presentations that cover the same content as webinars. These will be published between May and September 2017.         http://www.understandingstandards.org.uk/Subjects/Hospitality

  1. REHIS

The Royal Environmental Health Institute of Scotland (REHIS) is Scotland’s awarding body     for a number qualifications in Food Safety, Food and Health, Control of Infection and Occupational Health and Safety.  REHIS has worked in partnership with Food Standards Scotland for many years to make the Elementary Food Hygiene Course and Introduction to    Food Hygiene Course available to secondary schools all over Scotland.  For further            information please contact training@rehis.com or 0131 229 2968.


  1. Food & Drink Federation Scotland

Video resource looking at what the food industry is doing to reduce sugars in food.


  1. Food Standards Scotland ‘Munch That Lunch’ competition **Closing date 9th June 2017

Food Standards Scotland (FSS) is running a competition inviting P4-P7 pupils from Scottish primary schools to design and draw a healthy and balanced packed  lunch based on the Eatwell Guide and using our Munch That Lunch Guidance. The full briefing and entry form can be accessed online via        www.foodstandards.gov.scot/teachers

  1. Children’s Food Trust

To receive regular updates about Let’s Get Cooking, we invite you to register as one of our friends Let’s Get Cooking 

  1. Food and drink Career showcase Thursday 14 September at Murrayfield Stadium, Edinburgh.

The College Development Network (CDN) Food and Drink Industry Expo is designed for  education practitioners, pupils and students. This hands-on event showcases the  opportunities available in a fast-growing sector. The Food and Drink Industry offers careers      in:



Design and innovation

Product development and production.

The event takes place 1300 to 1800 Thursday 14 September at Murrayfield Stadium,   Edinburgh.

Find out more and sign up yourself and your pupils.


  1. Better Eating, Better Learning – 3 easy steps
  1. BEBL online support materials
  2. Follow activity on Twitter @BEBLScot
  3. Join our BEBL Glow community http://bit.ly/beblhome



Questions or queries about food education?

Please contact


New release: Career Education Standard (3-18) – Implementation review⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Education Scotland has undertaken a national review on the implementation of the Career Education Standard (3-18) since its release in September 2015.  The review also incorporated reflections on the Work Placements Standard and School/Employer Partnership Guidance.

The standards and the guidance were published with the understanding that Education Scotland would evaluate the impact the documents were having, in light of experience and use.  In response a team from Education Scotland visited 29 secondary schools between December 2016 and March 2017. The evidence from nine secondary school inspections and 30 Career Information Advice and Guidance (CIAG) reviews also recorded evidence about the implementation of the standards in secondary schools.  An online survey was established to maximise the participation of as many people and organisations as possible for the review.  In addition, a bespoke survey for employers, delivered on behalf of Education Scotland by the Federation of Small Businesses (FSB), attracted further responses. Questions on the review of the standards and guidance were also included in the annual Skills Development Scotland (SDS) Headteachers survey.

In summary, the purpose of the review was to ascertain answers to the following questions:

  1. To what extent have the standards and guidance been implemented and has the pace of implementation been sufficient in order to direct the next stage of activity and focus? There was a particular focus on the CES and how it was being implemented in secondary schools, alongside the expansion of the SDS service offer.
  2. Are the standards and guidance ambitious enough to deliver the aspirations of the DYW strategy?

You can access the complete report here.

DYW Interesting Practice – Calderglen High School: Inspirational learning delivered in partnership⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Calderglen High School has established far-reaching partnerships to deliver inspirational learning opportunities for young people.  The school’s strategic approach to Developing the Young Workforce ensures that all faculties actively collaborate with partners to develop and deliver a curriculum that supports the development of pupils’ employability and career management skills.
Calderglen has radically overhauled its curriculum to meet more appropriately the needs of all learners and to prepare young people for the opportunities, jobs and career pathways.  Using labour market information and incorporating work-based learning opportunities are central to providing learners with experiences that inspire career aspirations and realistic progression pathways.

Find out more about the school’s approach to career education through:



Ruthvenfield Primary School Inspection Experience⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

As part of Education Scotland’s on-going Inspection Mythbuster’s campaign, which has been developed to help beat the common misconceptions of inspection which have built up over the years, we have invited the Headteacher at Ruthvenfield Primary School, Andrew Clark, to blog about his inspection experience.

“After the initial ‘excitement’ of receiving pre inspection notification had passed, my preparation for inspection followed four main areas:

  1. Engaging with staff: I met with all staff in the school to plan out our inspection week, listen to concerns and ensure that everyone would be prepared to deliver their best throughout the process. We scheduled meetings and arranged time to get together. The management team worked on the Self Evaluation, reviewing this with teaching staff before sharing with all staff for agreement.
  2. Engaging with pupils: This was about ensuring our learners would be ready to share their school and really show all their best qualities throughout the week. That was easy!
  3. Inspection week timetable: This phase was about managing the timetable across the week, ensuring parents had opportunity to meet with inspectors and that nothing was left out. We wanted to make sure everyone in our school had the chance to speak and share their involvement in our school.
  4. Paperwork: I spent time preparing paperwork for the inspection process and cross checking sources of evidence to make sure that no stone was left unturned.

I also found that the self-evaluation for inspections is an ideal starting point for discussions about your school’s context. Throughout our inspection I referred back to our self-evaluation to make sure that the stories that go along with the statements were easy to find and that examples were a true depiction that could be ‘lived’.

Meetings were held throughout the week and we used these to work together to develop the school’s picture. Quick ‘catch-up’ meetings in the morning were always welcome and allowed me to add detail to any points from the previous day’s meetings.

Our inspection team made themselves available in a non-threatening, supportive way throughout the visit. Inspectors spent time throughout the week interacting with staff about learning and particular learners. We also found the Professional Dialogue session on the Tuesday afternoon was an opportunity to ask some deeper questions about our practice.

Overall, our Inspection validated the very good practice across our school and provided insight into themes of development. As a result, our direction after inspection is even clearer and more focussed, and we are a stronger school community with a refined vision for how we move from Good to Very Good and from Very Good to Excellent.”

Andrew Clark, Headteacher at Ruthvenfield Primary School, Perth

For more information about the Inspection Mythbuster’s campaign please visit the Education Scotland website.

Tackling the priorities in QuISE – a joined up approach?⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog


By Alan Armstrong, Strategic Director

Our report ‘Quality and improvement in Scottish education 2012-2016’ (QuISE) points to five key aspects of education and practice which we believe should be priorities for improvement if all learners in Scotland are to achieve their potential. Many or all sectors of education should be:

  • exploiting fully the flexibility of Curriculum for Excellence to meet better the needs of all learners;
  • improving arrangements for assessment and tracking to provide personalised guidance and support throughout the learner journey;
  • maximising the contribution of partnerships with other services, parents and the wider community to enhance children’s and young people’s learning experiences;
  • improving further the use of self-evaluation and improvement approaches to ensure consistent high quality of provision; and
  • growing a culture of collaboration within and across establishments and services to drive innovation, sharing of practice and collective improvement.

Looking at these priorities from my perspective in ensuring the implementation of Curriculum for Excellence, the employability and skills agenda, and digital learning and teaching, I am struck by how the priorities inter-relate and, indeed, are interdependent.

The flexibility offered by CfE has the potential for schools to design their curriculum structures in ways that reflect fully the local contexts and aspirations of their learners. Within this, the range of progression pathways can then enable children and young people to make suitably brisk progress across the broad general education, and into and through the senior phase.  This needs to be informed by improved assessment and tracking to ensure teachers, learners and parents make the most appropriate decisions at the right time.

However, there is no doubt that the curriculum structures needed to make this a reality rely very strongly on the direct contributions of partners, including agencies and local employers. Collaborations amongst staff within and across schools, with colleagues in colleges, community learning and development and other areas of expertise all combine to enrich the curriculum and motivate learners.

In early learning and childcare provision, primary and secondary schools, the new curriculum area Benchmarks are beginning to support a clearer understanding of learners’ progression across the broad general education. This  will help teachers to plan the breadth, challenge and application of learning that will prepare young people for the three year learner journey of their senior phase.  And that of course involves collaborations and the wide range of qualifications across the SCQF framework, exploiting again the flexibility of CfE in preparing learners for their futures.

Partnerships are the essential element in Developing the Young Workforce. I’m becoming aware of increasingly effective approaches to employability, skills and career education, often promoted through three-ways partnerships amongst schools, colleges and employers.  And by now you’ll be seeing the connections with the other QuISE priorities of collaboration and more informed personal guidance that can help to exploit that full flexibility in CfE.

Digital learning and teaching has great potential to promote and improve partnership working and collaboration, locally, nationally and internationally. Teachers and pupils can gain significantly in learning from the innovative and effective practice of others.  Where digital is central in planning and delivering learning and teaching, and makes use of learners’ own digital skills or develops them further, I’m in no doubt that young people benefit.  Digital can and does support teachers in their tracking and monitoring, reducing bureaucracy and workload.  As digital access and digital skills continues to improve, the opportunities for leaders, practitioners and learners to take steps that address the QuISE priorities are significant.

The individual QuISE chapters on each education sector highlight good practice as well as challenges in providing high quality experiences for all. The key is often the distinct professionalism of leaders and practitioners, engaging individually and collaboratively to reflect and to make the changes that matter.

Finally, effective self-evaluation is central to ensuring continuous improvement in addressing the priorities in QuISE.   I am beginning to see schools, colleges, and community learning and development now looking beyond their own centre and working with all partners in undertaking self-evaluation and analysing evidence.  The benefit will be greater collective understanding of how effectively their curriculum, learning, teaching and assessment genuinely meet their learners’ needs.  Where that process leads to jointly agreed actions for improvement, I’m in no doubt that the learning experiences and the outcomes for all children and young people will also improve.

DYW Interesting Practice – Craigroyston Community High School: Helping young people realise their aspirations⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog


Craigroyston Community High School has fully embraced the DYW agenda and designed a curriculum that provides all leaners with the opportunity to develop relevant skills and explore career pathways in order progress towards a positive sustained  destination after leaving school .

Pre-apprenticeship Programme  (See SQA)


Steve Ross – Reflections of a HT (Craigroyston)