Tag Archives: Social Studies

Engaging schools in community resilience⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Date:  Friday 10th March 2017

Time:  09.20 (for a 9.45 start) – 15.00

Venue:  Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Centre, Exhibition Ave, Bridge of Don, Aberdeen AB23 8BL

This one day event, organised by Aberdeenshire council with support from Education Scotland, Moray and Aberdeen councils aims to explore opportunities for schools and resilience professionals to work together to help build more resilient communities.

Using recent experiences with flooding as a context for developing resilience, this event will  provide support for  health and wellbeing outcomes in the curriculum as well as those in social subjects and science.

Primary and secondary schools from the three local authorities will outline their experiences with developing resilience through the curriculum and there will be opportunities for discussion and reflection during the day.  A number of external agencies will be present at the event to take part in discussion and to offer their support with resources to help teachers in schools.

This event is open to teachers and resilience professionals across Scotland and places will be allocated on a first come first served basis. If you are interested in signing up for this event please contact Gavin.Penman@aberdeenshire.gov.uk

Click here to view the draft-programme  of the day

Fake, Fiction or Fact? How can learners be helped to work out what’s true?⤴

from @ ICT for Teaching & Learning in Falkirk Primary Schools

There are so many choices for sources of news for learners to find out about what’s going on the world today, whether printed media, online news sites or social media. But how can learners be helped to be able to work out if what they are reading has any substance in fact, how accurate the information is, or what the biases are likely to be?

How can you spot fake news?

howtospotfakenewsinfographicHow to Spot Fake News – the IFLA (the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions), with thanks to www.factcheck.org, created an infographic detailing steps we can all take when trying to work out if what we are reading, hearing or watching is verifiable. This helps teach the skills of critical thinking and media literacy. This describes with visual representation 8 steps to take to help determine the likely authenticity of shared information: to consider the source, to read beyond the headline, the check credibility of the author, to look at linking sources, to check the date to see if current, to research to see if it’s satire, to consider your own biases and the likely ones of the source sharing the information, and to consult fact-checking sites. The infographic is available to download as either an image or in pdf format for printing.

takkfakenewsliteracy

Digital Literacy and “Fake News” – Resources to Help you help your students – many links collated by librarian-turned-technology-specialist Nancy Watson @nancywtech which help teachers guide their learners through ways to spot fake news and techniques to work out the authenticity of the shared information. The links include sites aimed at different age groups, teachers, younger learners, as well as for general public use. They include fact-checking sites as well as tips and advice to determining reliability of what is shared.

nwfakenewsepidemicDigital Literacy and the “Fake News” EpidemicNancy Watson has produced a superb resource for educators sharing a host of advice, tips and resources to support teachers support their learners to better be able to be discerning about the information shared online or in the print media. This includes examples of fake news and outlines the steps anyone can take to determine it to be factually inaccurate.

nprfakeorrealFake or real? How to self-check the news and get the facts – a post by digital news intern Wynne Davis describing the issue of fake news and giving practical advice for all ages about how to help determine whether what you are reading is true or fiction. Tips include checking the domain name (especially similar-sounding names), looking at quotations in the story (and checking up on who they are and anything known about them online), searching the quote itself to see if it properly attributed or taken out of context, check the comments to get a flavour of whether others call out the facts as being untrue and cite sources to back up their claims, reverse image search (right click on an image online and choose to search Google for it to see where else it is used and the context in which it is used).

Internet Archive and Wayback Machine

internetarchiveWouldn’t it be great if, when someone says content has changed on a website, or disappeared completely, that there was a way to look back at what was there beforehand? Well, The Internet Archive saves a huge amount of online content from many sources around the web (several hundred billion webpages!). This relies on the Wayback Machine (which is part of the Internet Archive) trawling on a regular basis for changed content. So if you search for a website and it is no longer available you can pop the weblink into the Wayback Machine (which is part of The Internet Archive) and look back at previous versions just by choosing a specific date. It will only be available for dates on which a trawl was made so is not available for every date but it’s still very impressive to be able to look at a website change over time and to be able to compare and contrast with versions over time.

savepagenowCan you save a web page on Wayback machine so it’s always there for future reference? Yes you can! You can simply capture a web page as it appears now for future use as a trusted citation in the future, or just to ensure it does not disappear when the original website changes or disappears. All you do is paste the weblink when you first find it on the Save Page Now” part of the Internet Archive site.

Fact-checking sites

There are a number of sites which can be used to verify whether stories (particularly those which appear on social media and spread like wildfire) have any basis in fact or whether they are urban myths, or out and out lies or propaganda. These include Politifact, Snopes, and Factcheck.org

Do you think you read with your bias? What bias does the writer have?

biasesaffectingusallBiases which affect us all – an infographic created by Business Insider which lists and describes 20 biases which we can all have when we read, hear or share information. Whether it’s a tendency to have a reliance on the first piece of information we hear, whether we are influenced by hearing the same information shared by a group, whether the information confirms what we already believed, stereotyping, or information which implies cause and effect, or many more – this infographic provides a useful starting point for discussing with learners the range of influences on us all when we all read or hear information.

 

Are we really there? Virtual Reality in the classroom⤴

from @ ICT for Teaching & Learning in Falkirk Primary Schools

So what is Virtual Reality or VR?

img_9516Virtual Reality, or VR, provides a means to have an experience of a location or object (whether real or imaginary) through a mobile device, often viewed through a headset, in such a way that when the viewer moves around they see the virtual view moving with them. So the images are usually 360 degree images and can be in 3D so that when viewed on a mobile device within a headset with twin lenses it appears to the viewer as being  as close to being there as possible. When you move forward, tilt your head, look up – it’s as if you are doing the same in the virtual reality experience.

What are the options for the classroom?

The least expensive option for using Virtual Reality in a classroom would be Google Expeditions using Google Cardboard viewers (while they can be viewed without a twin-lens 3D viewer the viewer will lose the feeling of 3D) which are held by the hand up to the eyes. More expensive options are available with a variety of VR viewer headsets (such as Microsoft HoloLens, Gear VR or Oculus Rift headsets) and accompanying sensors (often handheld) so that the experience can involve touching or interacting with objects within a VR experience – as you approach or touch something in virtual reality it will react in a way as it in real life.

Google Expeditions with Google Cardboard Viewers

img_9526Google Expeditions are virtual reality experiences designed with a classroom guided exploration in mind. The teacher downloads the choice of virtual reality location using the Google Expeditions app and starts the expedition. Then when the pupil on the same wi-fi connection starts the app on their device they will see the teacher-directed expedition awaiting them.

In Google Expeditions the teacher application provides suggestions for questions or directions to guide learners as they explore the virtual environment. The teacher can see on their mobile device app where the learners are exploring on their screens, and can make suggestions as the learners explore.

The video below is a promotional video for Google Expeditions in the classroom giving a brief overview of what it looks like in a classroom setting where a teacher with a tablet device guides pupils each holding a Google Cardboard headset viewer.

How do I get started using Google Expeditions?

The video below is a guided tutorial to using Google Expeditions

How do I use Google Expeditions with iPads or Android tablets?

The video below shows how Google Expeditions can be viewed on iPads rather than smartphones. Many school may already have iPads or Android tablets, and the Google Expeditions apps will work on these too. However the Google Cardboard viewer is designed with the size of a smartphone in mind. If you wish to use the app on an iPad or Android tablet then when running the setup at the point where you see the two images side by side there is a small icon at the top right which lets you change the twin view to single view. Having done that the view will no longer be 3D and will no longer be held up to the eyes of the viewer but simply handheld.

How to use Google Expeditions on iPads or tablet devices in the classroom

Where can I find Virtual Reality Experiences for my classroom?

Google Expeditions provides a superb source of Virtual Reality experiences ready to be downloaded for use on devices in the classroom.

discoveryvrDiscovery VR provides a wide range of downloadable virtual reality experiences in an educational context. Each is available for specific devices and come with notes for use by the educator with their class to guide their learners in the exploration of the experience.

 

Ideas for using Virtual Reality in the classroom

edtech4beginnersvr10ideas10 Simple Ways to Use Google Cardboard in the Classroom – a post by Neil Jarrett on the EdTech4 Beginners blog describing different ways in which the virtual reality app Google Cardboard can be used in the classroom.

whiteboardblogideasforvr

Ideas for using Google Cardboard Virtual Reality in the classroom – a blogpost on the Whiteboard Blog by Danny Nicholson

What Virtual Reality experiences have you used with your class?

Please share how you have used virtual reality experiences with your class by adding a comment below

 

What keeps you sharp? Over 40 this is for you⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

what-keeps-you-sharp

What Keeps You Sharp? survey launched

People often think of changes in their thinking skills with age in terms of decline. While some people do experience these changes, others do not.

What Keeps You Sharp? is a nationwide survey being led by researchers at Heriot-Watt University about your beliefs and attitudes to how thinking skills might change with age. They  also want to know if you think there are things we can do to maintain or improve thinking skills as we grow older.

If you’re aged 40 or over and living in the UK you can complete the survey online: http://tinyurl.com/keepingsharp.

 Help  spread the word

They  want to reach as broad an audience as possible, so share within your own networks – email lists, Facebook and other social media.

Anyone on social media can share the links  from @TheAgeingLab and the hashtag #WhatKeepsYouSharp?

Please share the survey among your friends and family and any groups you might be associated with.

Community resilience resources for schools⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Want to find out how to prepare for emergencies and keep yourself and other safe? Keep reading and find out how this key message can be used as an exciting approach to teaching and learning.

Download this flyer for exciting ways to integrate flooding, severe weather and other resilience issues into CfE.

CaptureRead these case studies to see what this looks like in practice.

 

 

See at a glance how you can take this forward in the classroom:

Health and Wellbeing – responsibility of all

Are you ready for severe weather, utility failure, flooding or pandemics? Make sure you know whatwhin-park-flooding-sepa to do.  Stay informed, pack a kit, make a plan.

Literacy

Our climate is changing and communities across Scotland are becoming increasingly affected by extreme weather events and flooding which can block roads, destroy homes and lead to loss of power for thousands of people. This can be used as an exciting context for:

  • report writing on the impact of severe weather on daily life in Scotland
  • talk/presentation at assembly and to the whole class
  • debating local issues like flood protection schemes and staying safe in emergencies
  • creating new written texts like an information leaflet or a safety brochure.

Social studies/geography

Are you doing work around natural disasters, weather, land use, map work?

Use community resilience as an exciting approach to cover these topics. By working with local authority resilience professionals you could gain access to information about flood plains, flood protection schemes and other areas of interest in the local area. Local authorities can share data and images from sensors, such as from traffic monitoring, to bring the learning to life in the classroom.  Contact your local authority to discover what may be available to help your school learn about community resilience.

Science

Scotland’s climate is changing as a result of climate change, so we are getting colder and wetter winters and hotter and wetter summers. Use community resilience as an exciting context to explore these issues.

  • explain some of the processes which contribute to climate change
  • consider how climate change influences changes in the atmosphere and then how this impacts on living things
  • investigate how severe weather can affect daily life in short, medium and long term, considering impact on social, economic and cultural life
  • create and use rain gauges as part of a project monitoring and analysing the weather in the local area
  • create anemometers to measure wind speed.

Technology

Use community resilience as an exciting context to:

  • design rain gardens, green roofs, identify ways to harvest rainwater
  • identify the impact, contribution, and relationship of technologies on the environment through flood protection schemes14677863_678528988971564_410767113_o-1
  • design and construct models to illustrate how sustainable urban drainage systems work
  • explore uses of materials
  • create and present weather forecasts based on personal research
  • investigate the impact of severe weather on people, place and the economy, on a local, national or international level.

 Numeracy and mathematics

Community resilience can be used as an exciting context to solve problems using a range of methods, sharing approaches and solutions with others e.g. money, measurement, data and analysis, chance and uncertainty:

  • use digital mapping and other information sources to work out how much salt is required to help clear a surface covered with snow
  • compare and contrast the contracts and cost plans offered by a range of utility companies, and consider how this may be affected by an emergency
  • use outcomes linked to chance and uncertainty to consider the likelihood of another utilities failure happening
  • consider how this may affect insurance premiums.

Poppy Scotland’s Letters Home Competition⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

small-poppy-scotlandThis year Poppy Scotland’s competition is called Letters Home, the competition asks you to write a letter back to your folks at home as though you were a soldier fighting at The Somme.

Reflecting on what you have learnt about World War 1 and the Battle of the Somme, think about how you would describe your experiences, your feelings about the battle and the difficulties of the environment you are living in. Consider the power your words would have in describing how the conflict affected you and those all around you, but bear in mind the impact your words would have on those receiving the letter.

Further information on the competition and how to enter can be found at: http://learning.poppyscotland.org.uk/competition/

The closing date is December 2nd and the winner will receive a tablet with seven runners-up receiving a £30 book token courtesy of National Book Tokens.

Battle of the Somme⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

small-battle-of-the-sommeJoin us live on Thursday 10th November at 10.30am from the Imperial War Museum to find out more about the Battle of the Somme which took place 100 years ago.

This year is the 100th anniversary of the Battle of the Somme- one of bloodiest conflicts of the First World War and subject of the world’s first full-length war documentary, filmed in 1916. In the first three months of its release the film was seen by around 20 million people in Britain and Ireland, informing and challenging the public with its images of warfare and changing the way both cinema and film was perceived.

In the Glow TV event we will we shall be showing excerpts from this iconic film, accompanied by an 8 minute background piece produced by Dr Toby Haggith from the Imperial War Museum, followed by a live Q&A session with Dr Haggith. This will help pupils prepare for Letters Home, this year’s competition run by Poppyscotland, which asks pupils to write a letter home as if from the trenches of The Somme.

Free-use images can be found at The Battle of the Somme

Register now to take part live – Battle of the Somme

If you unable to join us for the live event you can always catch up with the recording at another time – Glow TV’s Watch Again.

Battle of the Somme⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

small-battle-of-the-sommeJoin us live on Tuesday 22nd November at 2pm from the Imperial War Museum to find out more about the Battle of the Somme which took place 100 years ago.

This year is the 100th anniversary of the Battle of the Somme- one of bloodiest conflicts of the First World War and subject of the world’s first full-length war documentary, filmed in 1916. In the first three months of its release the film was seen by around 20 million people in Britain and Ireland, informing and challenging the public with its images of warfare and changing the way both cinema and film was perceived. You can view this video on YouTube – https://youtu.be/UhHdZLioRZg OR contact Jennifer McKay –Jennifer.mckay@educationscotland.gsi.gov.uk who can arrange for a copy of the original DVD to be sent to your school.

In the Glow TV event you can discuss the film with Dr Haggith of the Imperial War Museum and ask him questions about the battle and find out lots of additional information. This will help pupils prepare for Letters Home, this year’s competition run by Poppyscotland, which asks pupils to write a letter home as if from the trenches of The Somme.

Free-use images can be found at The Battle of the Somme

Register now to take part live – Battle of the Somme

If you unable to join us for the live event you can always catch up with the recording at another time – Glow TV’s Watch Again.

Poppyscotland Remembrance⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

small-poppy-scotlandJoin us live from Poppy Scotland on Tuesday 8th November at 11am to find out more about Remembrance and the significance of the poppy.

This year Poppyscotland have once again teamed up with Glow TV to bring you an event about Remembrance and the significance of the poppy. Take part in a live question and answer session with staff and veterans from Poppyscotland and Lady Haig’s Poppy Factory in Edinburgh, where 5 million poppies are hand-made each year.

Register now to take part live in Glow TV – Poppyscotland Remembrance

If you unable to join us for the live event you can always catch up with the recording at another time – Glow TV’s Watch Again.

Ready Scotland Photography Competition 2016⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Ready Scotland Photography Competition 2016ready-for-winter-westie

Be prepared for bad weather and win prizes for your school!

What is it?

Ready Scotland Photo and Caption Competition for P6 pupils. Take part in this competition to ensure you and your family are ready for winter!s4x4r-arran-130325-scords-2371

Before you start read this!

Radio can be really helpful in communicating information in an emergency.  Watch this youtube clip to find out how useful people in Chile found the radio during an emergency. Visit Ready Scotland website for more advice on staying safe in Scotland and  complete a family action plan. Visit Ready for Emergencies website for more ideas on staying safe this winter. cwfrn0gxeaajtlu

Action!

Now you’ve done your research we’d like you to communicate to others the importance of staying informed, having a grab-bag and looking out for neighbours through a photography and caption competition. In no more than 20 words provide a caption for your image that gets your message across clearly.

The prize!

The 3 winning schools will receive a wind-up radio for their own grab bags and a behind the scenes experience at their local Bauer network radio station.

The 3 winning schools will receive a wind-up radio for their own grab bags and a behind the scenes experience at their local Bauer network radio station. The Bauer network reaches over 25 million consumers and includes stations like heat, KISS, Magic and Absolute Radio. Each school will be able to send 6 pupils to their local station to see what is involved  in creating a radio show and will have the opportunity to try a few of the tricks of the trade.

Each school will be able to send 6 pupils to their local station to see what is involved  in creating a radio show and will have the opportunity to try a few of the tricks of the trade.

So have a go!  Win yourself and 5 of your classmates this exciting opportunity!

How to enter:

Each school should attach their top 5 entries as jpg’s to an email and send them to: info@keepscotlandbeautiful.org

In the text box add:

  • Name of school
  • Full name of pupil
  • Full name of class teacher
  • Caption describing the photo in no more than 20 words

Deadline for entries:

5pm on Thursday 17th November 2016