Tag Archives: Skills for Learning Life and Work

SDS: Help with subject choices⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The subjects your child chooses at school can have an impact on sds-in-school-infographics-aw2what they can study at college or university and what jobs they can go for in the future.

Skills Development Scotland careers advisers are available in schools for one-to-one sessions with pupils making early subject choices.

Building career management skills, these sessions aim to prepare young people to make confident, informed subject choices.

The careers adviser will support the young person to explore the impact of choices, understand what or who is influencing them and discuss the support offered by My World of Work’s subject choices tool.

Parents and teachers can get involved in this discussion or at another time.

My World of Work is packed with tools, information and resources to help young people with answering key questions and putting together a shortlist of subjects they can discuss with their parents, carers, teachers and careers adviser.

There’s also information for parents and carers on supporting their child at subject choice time.

Find out more about SDS careers services in schools

Go to myworldofwork.co.uk

Foundation Apprenticeships

Foundation Apprenticeships allow young people to get a head start in their career by knowledge and skills that are applied in the workplace – all before they’ve left school.

Sitting a Foundation Apprenticeship takes two years, usually starting in fifth year and is studied alongside National 5s and Highers. The difference is spending time out of school at college and with a top employer, so pupils get real, hands-on experience of the world of work.

It’s a chance to gain an industry-recognised qualifications (set at SQCF level 6) that opens up options for young people when they leave school.

Foundation Apprenticeships in ten subjects – including software development, healthcare, financial services and engineering – are available to pupils going into S5.

Find out more

SDS: Help with subject choices⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The subjects your child chooses at school can have an impact on sds-in-school-infographics-aw2what they can study at college or university and what jobs they can go for in the future.

Skills Development Scotland careers advisers are available in schools for one-to-one sessions with pupils making early subject choices.

Building career management skills, these sessions aim to prepare young people to make confident, informed subject choices.

The careers adviser will support the young person to explore the impact of choices, understand what or who is influencing them and discuss the support offered by My World of Work’s subject choices tool.

Parents and teachers can get involved in this discussion or at another time.

My World of Work is packed with tools, information and resources to help young people with answering key questions and putting together a shortlist of subjects they can discuss with their parents, carers, teachers and careers adviser.

There’s also information for parents and carers on supporting their child at subject choice time.

Find out more about SDS careers services in schools

Go to myworldofwork.co.uk

Foundation Apprenticeships

Foundation Apprenticeships allow young people to get a head start in their career by knowledge and skills that are applied in the workplace – all before they’ve left school.

Sitting a Foundation Apprenticeship takes two years, usually starting in fifth year and is studied alongside National 5s and Highers. The difference is spending time out of school at college and with a top employer, so pupils get real, hands-on experience of the world of work.

It’s a chance to gain an industry-recognised qualifications (set at SQCF level 6) that opens up options for young people when they leave school.

Foundation Apprenticeships in ten subjects – including software development, healthcare, financial services and engineering – are available to pupils going into S5.

Find out more

‘Speakers for Schools’: Inspirational talks by UK’s leading figures⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

s4s-logoSpeakers for Schools is an independent education charity that provides young people in state secondary schools with access to key influential, eminent figures – free of charge. In 2012 they launched in Scotland but know there are still many schools not yet aware of their work that can help support them in their aims to better prepare their young people, inspire them in their ambitions and help young people develop skills and attributes they need to thrive in modern society.

The programme was founded by ITV Political Editor Robert Peston with the ambition of organising free talks from inspiring, brilliant industry leaders from all backgrounds in state schools across the UK, to level the playing field for all young people. Since launching the charity has attracted a network of over 1,000 speakers and organised over 3,279 free talks with schools and colleges across the UK.

These talks allow leading figures to give their time to share their insights and unique experiences with young people as someone at the top of their field, aiming to help broaden students’ horizons, make them feel confident about the possibilities for their future and motivate them to reach their maximum potential.

The talks help complement efforts of educators to raise attainment, aspirations and get learners thinking about the wider world, by engaging them in meaningful discussion.

As a charity Speakers in Schools believe their talks help by:

  • Seeing that all young people have the chance to experience a curriculum through which they learn about the worldof work, we can help you provide this by giving students access to insights, information and perspectives from top, influential figures to help them in preparing for their own future
  • Breaking down misconceptions about the opportunities available to students and/or bridging information gaps to encourage diverse thinking and change the way they think about their own ambitions.
  • Teachers being given support to facilitate young people’s learning and their ability to engage with a rapidly developing landscape of work/career and learning opportunities directly from industry leaders, and broadly increasing school links to more organisations, industries and networks.

 

Their services are free, and state secondary schools in Scotland are eligible to apply.

To find out more or to see if your school is already registered visit: http://www.speakers4schools.org/howitworks

DYW Interesting Practice – Ferguslie – Pre5 Centre: Skills Development in Early Years⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

pwp_2896Fergulsie Pre 5 Centre, this year’s Scottish Education Award winner in the category ‘Employability across Learning’,  provides a skills based learning approach for children from 3 – 5 years, actively seeking to connect learning to the world of work whenever possible.  Through a variety of play contexts and in connection with professionals and local businesses they engage in projects that inspire enterprising attitudes and creativity.  At the same time it introduces children to a range of jobs people hold within the wider community.

pwp_3132Children are at the heart of this approach, influencing the direction of projects by leading the learning.   Some examples include the creation of a ‘dog house’, their business venture, the ‘Rainbow Café’ for the local community and creating a nursery newspaper.

The Tackling Poverty agenda has further motivated staff to support children in developing the necessary skills and confidence to succeed. The opportunities and experiences put ipwp_3552n place in partnership with parents supports the develop of skills for everyone involved ensuring that no matter their stage of development they are equipped to lead their own learning and celebrate their achievements.

Judith Thomas, head of the centre says:  “At Ferguslie Pre-five Centre our children have a natural curiosity about the world around them and we, as a staff, have put an increased emphasis on the development of children’s skills through play.  They engage in projects that develops a depth of learning and to scaffold this, we connect to and work with businesses and professions.  Local schools and colleges also  support the projects children engage in and they understand who can help them achieve.”   Partners and parents make valuable contributions to the curriculum and opportunities to involve the local community in children’s learning are maximised. ”

The holistic approach taken by the centre to developing skills and engaging children in play around the world of work providpwp_2676es inspiration and creative engagement opportunities that fosters positive attitudes for learning, life and work, important stepping stones for career education from 3 – 18.

Hear more about the nursery’s approach to developing skills for learning, life and work employability by accessing the following interview with Judith:

 

Additional resource:

2016 Scottish Learning Festival presentation:  career-education-at-ferguslie-pre-five-centre

DYW Interesting Practice – Woodfarm High School: A whole school approach to career education⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Woodfarm High School in East Renfrewshire has developed a holistic approach to career education for learners at all levels in order to equip them with the necessary skills to fully realise their aspirations in life.

Using the Career Education Standard (CES)  an audit had been undertaken to embed the entitlements for young people into the curriculum.  In partnership with employers and parents, learners are fully engaged in maximising  opportunities to enhance career education across all aspects of learning.   This includes initiatives such as a S6 Career Ambassadors programme, business breakfasts,  presentations to challenge career stereotypes, an S2 STEM project and a ‘Skills week’ across all subjects.

In reflection of the Work Placements Standard the school has developed a flexible, fully integrated model that provides work-based learning opportunities for learners  at various stages of their development.

Integral to the new approach at the school is the engagement of staff.  CLPL opportunities are on offer during inset days and collegiate time and a ‘Teaching and Learning Community’ has been established to collaborate with employers in order to coordinate and enhance work-based learning opportunities.

Woodfarm HS has also developed a ‘Employer Partnership’ database in connection with the local authority and East Renfrewshire’s Chamber of Commerce in order to enhance the quality and scope of experiences for learners around the world of work.  As a result young people have the opportunity to visit local business, engage in work shadowing and extended work placements, practice interview skills and CV writing and find out about careers, including Modern Apprenticeships, through career evenings, talks, 1-1 sessions and enterprise activities.

Read the ‘Interesting Practice summary sheet to find out more about the career education programme at Woodfarm: dyw-int-practice-summary-woodfram-hs

Watch the film clip about the S3 DYW day

DYW Interesting Practice: Dalziel High School – Skills development through STEM⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

dalziel-hs-stem-learnersDalziel High School has a well established, strategic career education programme from P7 transition to senior phase.  At the heart of this is a focus on STEM careers supported by a highly dynamic, award-winning school-employer partnership with the engineering company Amec Foster Wheeler.

Throughout there time at Dalziel High School all learners will have the opportunity to get involved in a wide variety of STEM related learning initiatives from participating in  Science & Technology fayres, STEM challenges, Space School and  Science & Engineering competitions to undertaking a Foundation Apprenticeship.

The following brief outline describes the core activities, purpose and outcomes of the career education approaches taken at the school:

 

Additional materials:

  • Film clip:

Foundation Apprenticeship and scholarship opportunities in the senior phase – a learner perspective

  • Skills poster:

Access the dalziel-hs-skills-poster designed by the school to assist learners in  identifying their skills and  linking them to their profiles.

  • Scottish Learning Festival 2017 – presentation:

slf-21-09-16-dhs-amecfw-003

Scottish Education Awards 2017: Nominations open now!⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Category:  Employability across Learning (Early Years/Primary and Secondary)scottish-education-awards-2017

The Scottish Education Awards recognise schools and centres that have developed a vibrant and progressive culture and climate of continuous innovation.

The culture and ethos should promote respect, ambition and achievement while improving outcomes for all learners in ways which eliminate inequity.

Nominations should include practical activities and projects that the school or centre has undertaken, detailing the impact these strategies have had on pupils, staff, parents and the community.

  • How is your school ensuring all young people have the opportunities to develop skills for learning, life and work?
  • How are these skills being developed across all curriculum areas within the school, in interdisciplinary studies and in all other contexts and settings where young people are learning?
  • How is your school ensuring young people, are aware of, and understand, the value of skills for learning, life and work that they are developing?
  • How is your school ensuring parents are aware of, and understand, the value of skills for learning, life and work skills that they are developing?
  • How is your school developing quality partnerships with employers?

What are the outcomes of these approaches in terms of impact on:

  • children and young people
  • the whole school community
  • the wider community

Nominations close at 12 noon on Wednesday 15 February 2017

Nominate an early years/ primary school here.

Secondary school nominations here please.

Download and share the scottish-education-awards-2017-prom-flyer!

Govan High School Marks £2 Million Milestone For Youth & Philanthropy Initiative Scotland⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

yipThe Youth and Philanthropy Initiative (YPI) in Scotland has announced that a total of £2 million has now been awarded to local grassroots charities since the programme was first introduced in Scotland by The Wood Foundation in 2008. This year alone a total of 210 Scottish secondary schools will participate in YPI, actively engaging over 26,500 students in a hands on experience of social action and philanthropy.  The latest £3000 grant will be awarded at Govan High School’s YPI Final on Friday 18th November, marking a significant milestone for the YPI programme.

Commenting on Govan High School’s YPI Final and hitting the £2 million milestone, Sir Ian Wood, Chairman of The Wood Foundation said, “YPI is by far The Wood Foundation’s most successful philanthropic initiative in Scotland.  Beyond the grants YPI has awarded to local charities, the programme most significantly impacts upon young people, not only providing a valuable experience of philanthropy but also nurturing critical employability and enterprise skill development.  We are proud that today’s YPI celebration event at Govan High School marks a total of £2 million invested in local communities across Scotland through the programme.  This is a remarkable milestone, made possible through the dedication of our participating schools and charities, the support of our programme funding partners, and the enthusiasm of all participating students.”

Govan High School has now participated in YPI Scotland for two yip-govan-hsyears, delivering the programme across their full S2 cohort as part of the school’s Wider Achievement Programme. Through YPI, Govan High School students are encouraged to draw upon their strengths and learning from across the school, and look beyond the classroom in order to link closely with the wider school community.  Teachers at Govan High have noted a massive impact on their learners through the development of vital skills including research, communication and team work, and students have also demonstrated real commitment to the programme, with many dedicating their own time to visit local charities, as they address local social issues.

Nancy Belford, Head Teacher of Govan High School, commented, “As a school we strive to create a caring, inclusive and happy learning community and the whole ethos behind the YPI Programme helps to enhance this vision. YPI encourages our young people to care about their community through identifying a social issue that is important to them; it builds links between people and organisations in the wider community as students explore and visit charities; and it helps to promote inclusion as our young people come to understand what is happening on their own doorstep and what it is they can do to help some of the most vulnerable groups within the local community.”

The YPI programme is now delivered across 31 local authority areas throughout Scotland and over half of all secondary schools in the Glasgow City area are now actively involved in the programme.

Maureen McKenna, Director of Education at Glasgow City Council and guest judge at Govan High School’s YPI Final stated, “YPI is proving to be a highly effective framework through which students can broker and establish meaningful partnerships across their school community, develop essential skills for learning, life & work, and directly support local people & groups most in need.  This in itself encapsulates what Curriculum for Excellence is all about.  I am very proud of the involvement of schools in our area and that Govan High School’s 2016 YPI Final also recognises a total of £2 million invested in local Scottish charities through YPI.”

Career Education Standard (3-18): Exemplification Tool offers a ‘helping hand’⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

ces-exemplification-toolA new tool is now available for practitioners to support planning and developing new practice in career education or to reflect on existing practice.   Based on the ‘I can’ statements in the Career Education Standard (3-18) it provides illustrations of what children and young people might experience in order to help them meet their entitlements.  For ease of reference the entitlements have been appended to the resource and linked to each theme.  The tool  supports  practitioners  to consider what  career education might look like in their own particular contexts and to plan accordingly.

Structure

The exemplification tool groups the entitlements and the illustrative  ‘I can statements’ in five themes and by levels.  Alongside these are suggestions of the types of activities that children and young people might experience as they work towards their entitlements.

The themes are :

  1. Exploring the concept of work (from simulated experiences to the world of work)
  2. Expanding horizons and ambitions
  3. Diversity and equity
  4. Seeking help and information
  5. Finding a route to work

Down load the exemplification tool here:  ces-exemplification-tool

Illustrations of how education establishments have implemented DYW across the curriculum can be found on the Education Scotland ‘Learning Blog’.

Career Education Standard 3-18: Weaving career education into the curriculum⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

ken-edwardsBy Ken Edwards, Education Programme Lead, Skills Development Scotland

Published in September 2015, the Standard addresses the ambition to reduce youth unemployment by better preparing young people for the world of work and is a direct response to one of the recommendations in Education Working for All! The standard reflects existing Curriculum for Excellence guidance; most obviously, in relation to Building the Curriculum 4: Skills for learning, life and work but also in delivering some of the health and wellbeing outcomes that are, of course, the responsibility of all.

At the heart of the new Standard lies a set of entitlements for all learners and a corresponding set of expectations for each of the four key influencers in young peoples’ learning and career choices: you as teachers or education practitioners; parents and carers; employers and, of course, Skills Development Scotland (SDS) the national skills agency.

I know from previous experience that the landscape of Scottish education can sometimes appear cluttered with seemingly unconnected new initiatives that compete for limited development time. Therefore, it’s heartening to know that as schools begin to deliver the entitlements and expectations described in this new Standard it will also help them address some of the other current priorities in Scottish education.

A significant body of research shows more systematic and progressive delivery of quality career education works on two fronts. Firstly it helps young people to develop the essential career management skills needed to successfully navigate the increasingly complex and extended transition from school into further learning, training or employment. Secondly, it has more immediate positive impacts by helping to set learning in a relevant real-life context so raising learners’ engagement and motivation. In turn, this leads to measurable improvements in achievement and attainment and makes a valuable contribution to closing the attainment gap. All of which are priorities in Scottish Government’s new National Improvement Framework.

Support for you

The Career Education Standard acknowledges and builds on the existing good practice seen in classrooms across Scotland and aspires to make this common practice in future.

Fortunately, with such an ambition, you are not alone in implementing the Standard. SDS and other partners are working hard to provide additional guidance and support to help you develop young people’s skills for life and work and so ensure that DYW sustainably improves learning experiences and outcomes for all.

SDS’s team of expert Careers Advisers have started working with pupils from an earlier stage; beginning at the point of transition from P7 to S1 and continuing to be involved at all stages until thesds-in-school-infographics-aw2 end of school. They offer a combination of group and one-to-one activities geared to developing the essential career management skills that help young people make informed learning and career choices providing a valuable complement to school career education programmes. We have been working in close collaboration with Education Scotland and a number of primary, secondary and additional support needs schools across Scotland to develop, test and refine this support.

We know young people are going online for information and help. Only last week Childwise figures showed 7-16 year olds are spending 3 hours a day on line, that’s up to 4.8 hours for 15 to 16 year olds. This growing trend coincides with the news that SDS’s digital resource is already being significantly enhanced, with more on the way. This includes the updated and more intuitive version of My World of Work, our award-winning careers information and advice web service, which launched on 25 January.

There will also be a new dedicated digital offer aimed at CfE second level (P5-7) and an exploration of how P7 pupils can best use My World of Work. These digital resources are accompanied by a range of support materials that can help teachers and pupils to better connect learning in and beyond the classroom to the world of work.

SDS is also working to enhance practitioners’ confidence and skills in the area of career education. We are working with Education Scotland to develop a suite of learning resources that will support career-long professional learning. These will be gradually rolled out over the coming months and will focus on getting to know the Standard, how to make effective use of My World of Work, career management skills and also an insight into career and labour market intelligence and how to access current information.

SDS will also be able to further support schools in engaging and working with employers, and along with the National Parent Forum of Scotland have already developed a guide for parents to career education in schools.

Coming up

Over the coming months you’ll hear more from my colleagues in SDS on each of these areas and the progress that’s being made.

In March we’ll update you on the launch of the re-developed My World of Work and the new and improved tools and content as well as plans for the future.’

Useful Links

Read the Career Education Standard

Find out more about Skills Development Scotland

Get the help you need for the career you want at My World of Work

See the National Parent Forum of Scotland nutshell guide Career Education: A World of Possibilities

Building the Curriculum 4

Education Working for All!