Tag Archives: Skills Development Scotland

SDS news: National STEM event at South Lanarkshire Council⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Uddingston Grammar Head Teacher John McKay, Frank, SDS Careers Adviser Donna Robertson and SDS Acting Director of Operations James Russell.

Frank Devine, SDS Careers Adviser at Uddingston Grammar School, tells us more about a recent event supporting teachers to encourage young people to consider STEM careers.  ‘We understand the influential role teachers play in young people’s careers choices.

Part of our role as Scotland’s national careers service is to ensure we work closely with, and support teachers to, offer the support young people need to make informed career decisions.  That was the main driver behind our recent Career Gap event.   Working with South Lanarkshire Council’s Developing the Young Workforce co-ordinator as well as a group of local teachers, our aim was to give teachers across the area help to support pupils to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and maths.

More than 50 attended, from 18 local area secondary schools.

By tapping in to the wealth of expertise and knowledge on offer across SDS, we were able to offer a full day programme looking at the subject from a variety of angles – equalities, career management skills and employer need.

Our National Training Programmes team supported the day to raise awareness of the ways unconscious bias could be stopping some pupils, especially young women, progressing in STEM.

They brought in Improving Gender Balance Scotland project officer Charlotte Govan to give some cold hard numbers on subject uptake, and the impact that has further down on employment, as well as practical ways of combatting unconscious bias.

Our employer team helped to put us in touch with employers and apprentices to tell teachers their stories, offer ideas on support that could be helpful to pupils now, and talk about what it’s really like to work in STEM industries. BT, BAE and Scotland Energy and Utility Skills all attended on the day.

My colleague Donna Robertson and I were able to give more information on career management skills, career long professional learning modules we offer, the support resources available to teachers via My World of Work and more detail on SDS careers services in schools.

All the teachers who attended took away packs with more information on the support SDS offers, and we’ll be creating further lesson plans and resources to share with all the teachers who attended.

This wasn’t just a chance at CPD for teachers, but offered us the chance to develop the skills of young people from the area too. Recent graduate Stephen Benedetti lent his sound engineer skills for the podium and round table mics, and sixth year Uddingston pupil Adam McKibben snapped pictures for us on the day which were used on the SDS website and social media.

Partnership working was key to the success of the event, as it is to all the work SDS is involved in.

Donna and I are really proud of the strength of the partnerships we have here in South Lanarkshire.  We work closely with all members of the school staff, including subject teachers, pastoral care teachers and the senior management team, the local authority and with partner organisations working within education and with our customers across the area.

It’s those strong partnerships that allow us to stage not just major one-off events like this, but to ensure day-to-day we are offering the best service we can to our customers.

Our recent Education Scotland review shows our hard work is paying off.

If you want to find out more about the support SDS can offer teachers, speak to your school careers adviser for latest information and events and find out about support resources we offer at My World of Work here.

You can also access CLPL modules on the Career Education Standard, labour market information, career management skills and My World of Work at this page.

NPFS Nutshell guide: Creativity, Enterprise and Employability⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The latest National Parent Forum of Scotland nutshell guide is now available on the NPFS website: http://www.npfs.org.uk/creativity-in-a-nutshell/

Its focus is Creativity, Enterprise and Employability so we hope you will find this guide particularly useful in your work. It is has been produced by the NPFS in partnership with Skills Development Scotland with input from a range of other partners, including NCLN representatives and Young Enterprise Scotland.

It recognises the significant and increasing link between future employability and well developed creativity skills in young people. In their 2016 report ‘The Future of Jobs’, the World Economic Forum highlighted anticipated changes in employability skills and suggested that by 2020 over one third of the skills considered important in today’s workforce will have changed. Notably, creativity will have become one of the top three skills needed to deal with the avalanche of new products, new technologies and new ways of working. https://www.weforum.org/reports/the-future-of-jobs . As you know, the focus on creativity and employability is also reflected in Quality Indicator 3.3 in the latest (2016) version of the school self-evaluation and improvement guide How Good is our School?

Career Education Standard 3-18: Weaving career education into the curriculum⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

ken-edwardsBy Ken Edwards, Education Programme Lead, Skills Development Scotland

Published in September 2015, the Standard addresses the ambition to reduce youth unemployment by better preparing young people for the world of work and is a direct response to one of the recommendations in Education Working for All! The standard reflects existing Curriculum for Excellence guidance; most obviously, in relation to Building the Curriculum 4: Skills for learning, life and work but also in delivering some of the health and wellbeing outcomes that are, of course, the responsibility of all.

At the heart of the new Standard lies a set of entitlements for all learners and a corresponding set of expectations for each of the four key influencers in young peoples’ learning and career choices: you as teachers or education practitioners; parents and carers; employers and, of course, Skills Development Scotland (SDS) the national skills agency.

I know from previous experience that the landscape of Scottish education can sometimes appear cluttered with seemingly unconnected new initiatives that compete for limited development time. Therefore, it’s heartening to know that as schools begin to deliver the entitlements and expectations described in this new Standard it will also help them address some of the other current priorities in Scottish education.

A significant body of research shows more systematic and progressive delivery of quality career education works on two fronts. Firstly it helps young people to develop the essential career management skills needed to successfully navigate the increasingly complex and extended transition from school into further learning, training or employment. Secondly, it has more immediate positive impacts by helping to set learning in a relevant real-life context so raising learners’ engagement and motivation. In turn, this leads to measurable improvements in achievement and attainment and makes a valuable contribution to closing the attainment gap. All of which are priorities in Scottish Government’s new National Improvement Framework.

Support for you

The Career Education Standard acknowledges and builds on the existing good practice seen in classrooms across Scotland and aspires to make this common practice in future.

Fortunately, with such an ambition, you are not alone in implementing the Standard. SDS and other partners are working hard to provide additional guidance and support to help you develop young people’s skills for life and work and so ensure that DYW sustainably improves learning experiences and outcomes for all.

SDS’s team of expert Careers Advisers have started working with pupils from an earlier stage; beginning at the point of transition from P7 to S1 and continuing to be involved at all stages until thesds-in-school-infographics-aw2 end of school. They offer a combination of group and one-to-one activities geared to developing the essential career management skills that help young people make informed learning and career choices providing a valuable complement to school career education programmes. We have been working in close collaboration with Education Scotland and a number of primary, secondary and additional support needs schools across Scotland to develop, test and refine this support.

We know young people are going online for information and help. Only last week Childwise figures showed 7-16 year olds are spending 3 hours a day on line, that’s up to 4.8 hours for 15 to 16 year olds. This growing trend coincides with the news that SDS’s digital resource is already being significantly enhanced, with more on the way. This includes the updated and more intuitive version of My World of Work, our award-winning careers information and advice web service, which launched on 25 January.

There will also be a new dedicated digital offer aimed at CfE second level (P5-7) and an exploration of how P7 pupils can best use My World of Work. These digital resources are accompanied by a range of support materials that can help teachers and pupils to better connect learning in and beyond the classroom to the world of work.

SDS is also working to enhance practitioners’ confidence and skills in the area of career education. We are working with Education Scotland to develop a suite of learning resources that will support career-long professional learning. These will be gradually rolled out over the coming months and will focus on getting to know the Standard, how to make effective use of My World of Work, career management skills and also an insight into career and labour market intelligence and how to access current information.

SDS will also be able to further support schools in engaging and working with employers, and along with the National Parent Forum of Scotland have already developed a guide for parents to career education in schools.

Coming up

Over the coming months you’ll hear more from my colleagues in SDS on each of these areas and the progress that’s being made.

In March we’ll update you on the launch of the re-developed My World of Work and the new and improved tools and content as well as plans for the future.’

Useful Links

Read the Career Education Standard

Find out more about Skills Development Scotland

Get the help you need for the career you want at My World of Work

See the National Parent Forum of Scotland nutshell guide Career Education: A World of Possibilities

Building the Curriculum 4

Education Working for All!

 

Making skills work and promoting apprenticeships⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

letitiaFrom As the national skills body, we, Skills Development Scotland (SDS) support the people and businesses of Scotland by delivering services that help them to achieve their ambitions.

With careers advisers in secondary schools and high street centres across the country, we are passionate about developing skills in the community and getting more young people into work.

We also support and promote work based learning and apprenticeships which offer young people the chance to get a job, get paid and get qualified.

As part of this promotion, we are working with employers, training providers and partners to co-ordinate events and activity throughout autumn to raise awareness of apprenticeships and the benefits of work based learning.

The Scottish Government’s Youth Employment Strategy and the aims of Developing the Young Workforce include reducing youth unemployment and bringing education and industry closer together.

To support this, young people in Dumfries and Galloway are encouraged find out more about apprenticeships at an upcoming SDS event taking place on Friday 25th at Easterbrook Hall.

Aimed at pupils from S2 to S4, this event will help inform pupils when making choices about their future. It provides  a great opportunity to hear real life experiences from apprentices as well as the chance to meet employers.  Young people will get an insight as to the benefits of apprenticeships and career opportunities provided by work based learning through exclusive demonstrations.

mohammadYou might not know but there are more than 25,500 new Modern Apprenticeship opportunities across Scotland each year, with over 80 different types available in hundreds of jobs!  From financial services and healthcare to construction and IT, each apprenticeship is developed by industry to suit their needs.    This means that apprentices can build valuable work experience from day one and gain an accredited qualification which is recognised by industry.

It’s worth noting that last year there were 765 Modern Apprenticeship starts in Dumfries and Galloway, up from 753 in 2014/15.

Apprenticeships provide an alternative route into the world of work, equipping young people with the skills they need to succeed. Foundation Apprenticeships mean you can also now start a Modern Apprenticeship at school.   With a Foundation Apprenticeship pupils in S5 can complete elements of a Modern Apprenticeship alongside their other studies, such as Nat5s or Highers.Foundation Apprenticeships take two years to complete with pupils spending part of the week out of school, getting hands-on experience at college and with a local employer in their chosen industry.

With a Foundation Apprenticeship they leave school with an industry-recognised qualification which is set at SCQF level 6 – the same level as a Higher.

And now Graduate Level Apprenticeships provide a new way into degree-level study for individuals who are currently employed, or who want to go straight into work.

Visit apprenticeships.scot  to find out all you need to know about apprenticeships and to search and apply for vacancies.

Making Skills Work: Promoting Apprenticeships⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

apprenticeshipsSkills Development Scotland (SDS) is working with employers, training providers and partners to co-ordinate events and activity throughout autumn to promote apprenticeships and the benefits of work based learning.

At the events pupils will have the chance to experience exclusive demonstrations from local employers and apprentices. These sessions will provide an insight as to the benefits of apprenticeships and the career opportunities provided by work based learning.

Aimed at pupils from S2 to S4, the events will help inform pupils when making choices about their future. Click here for the full list of events. For more information or queries please contact Lauren Sweeney

Making Skills Work: Promoting Apprenticeships⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

apprenticeshipsSkills Development Scotland (SDS) is working with employers, training providers and partners to co-ordinate events and activity throughout autumn to promote apprenticeships and the benefits of work based learning.

At the events pupils will have the chance to experience exclusive demonstrations from local employers and apprentices. These sessions will provide an insight as to the benefits of apprenticeships and the career opportunities provided by work based learning.

Aimed at pupils from S2 to S4, the events will help inform pupils when making choices about their future. Click here for the full list of events. For more information or queries please contact Lauren Sweeney

Skills Development Scotland: Extended career services offer⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Skills Development Scotland (SDS) is expanding its careers sJ Russell Head of CEServices in schools from June 2016, Head of Career Management Skills Development and Delivery James Russell tells us more.

“I can still remember the best piece of advice I was offered while I was at school – be the best you can be and do what will make you happy.

The advice came from my sister who was a maths teacher.

She supported me throughout school not just in her subject, but also in developing study skills and what I now understand to be the fundamental principles of a learning or continuous improvement cycle.

Her support had a huge impact on me, helping me to develop my knowledge, skills and confidence.

It challenged my thinking on what motivated me and what I wanted to do with my life.

It’s more than 20 years since my sister said those words to me, but my experience reflects how good careers advice can open young people’s eyes to the opportunities and possibilities of their future.

The work of SDS careers advisers is having a similar long-lasting impact on young people across Scotland day-in and day-out.

Now, I’m lucky enough to be part of the team at SDS working to extend the reach of our careers services in schools to offer further support for younger pupils, their teachers and parents.

This expansion will allow us to reach younger pupils, especially at big transition points such as choosing subjects, or at the move from primary to secondary school.

It will help ensure the choices they make about their future are informed, and based on their skills, interests and abilities alone.

What to expect

SDS In-School Infographics AW2June marks the start of the new offer being available across the country.  The extended elements of the offer will see Careers Advisers:

  • hold group sessions at primary 7 transition or early in S1 to support individuals during this key transition phase; and with pupils in S2 and S3, aligned with arrangements for making subject choices
  • offer one-to-one interviews with pupils at subject choices time and offer their parent/ carer and/or teacher to be involved during this one-to-one or at another suitable time
  • working closely with schools to identify and agree the delivery of enhanced support to develop career management skills (CMS) to those S3 pupils who need it most, on a one-to-one basis. Follow-up group activity can also be held as agreed

That’s in addition to what’s already in secondary schools which sees SDS advisers:

  • hold group sessions during the senior phase (S4-S6) using interactive activities to continue to develop pupils’ CMS
  • offer one-to-one coaching for those pupils in the senior phase who need it most to support their decision making and progression
  • hold drop-in clinics for all young people from S1-S6
  • be available at parents’ events

Testing is also continuing on our new career education tools and resources for primary 5 to 7 teachers and pupils, which will be available in August.

These will be accessed through our award-winning career information and advice web service, My World of Work, which also has specific advice and support for parents and carers.

Tried and tested

The changes support delivery of the Career Education Standard and the outcomes of Developing Scotland’s Young Workforce, as well as complementing a wide range of other SDS projects such as Foundation Apprenticeships and Improving Gender Balance Scotland.

Annual discussions between SDS and individual secondary schools on the SDS School Partnership Agreement are underway. These discussions enable us to collaborate on how we align and integrate SDS services to compliment the curriculum activities already in place to develop pupils’ knowledge of the world of work and career pathways.

The partnership agreements ensure we can shape how SDS resources are best used to match each school’s strengths, needs and local circumstances.

35 schools in 12 local authorities worked with us across the 2015/16 academic year to be ‘early demonstrators’ for the extended offer. This has enabled us to evaluate the service offer in practice and develop it further in advance its introduction in all other schools across the 2016/17 academic year.

Young people, teachers and SDS staff were an integral part of the process of developing the Career Education Standard and our expanded careers services offer; our work with them will continue to help us understand how we can improve the service further.

We’ve also developed CLPL modules for teachers along with Education Scotland. The first, an introduction and overview of the Career Education Standard, is already online. Three more will be added soon on Career Management Skills, labour market information and My World of Work.

We all want young people to be able to go on to successful and fulfilling careers, and I look forward to the part SDS can play in supporting them to get there.”

Agile Software Development opportunity with Industry⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

 

digital world eyeXP2016

XP2016 in association with Skills Development Scotland Digital World are offering school students, P5 – P7 and S1 – S3, the exciting opportunity to take part in a free software development workshop at the International Conference on Agile Software Development in Edinburgh 24-27th May.  This is the first time the digital industry has given school students the chance to take part in an industry conference.

Invitation – Software Development Workshop (2)

Coderdojo coding clubs will be delivering the workshop, providing a fantastic opportunity for schools to get hands on with software development and for students to get an exciting taster of what a career in software development might involve.

The event is held in Edinburgh and the organisers will be making contribution to travel costs to help schools from further away take part.   Places are very limited and schools will be drawn from a hat to ensure fairness. Schools MUST REGISTER by Friday 22 April to be part of the draw.

If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to contact Ketty Lawrence, Skills Development Scotland – Ketty.Lawrence@sds.co.uk

Career Education Standard – Learning Resources: An SDS update⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

CES Learning resMarie Lloyd works in Organisational Development at Skills Development Scotland and is part of a team working with Education Scotland to develop Career-long Professional Learning (CLPL) modules built around the Career Education Standard:  “We all want young people to go on to fulfilling careers when they leave school.”

Every day, through Curriculum for Excellence young people are learning skills for life and work. Supported by teachers and practitioners like you, they are making connections between what they learn in the classroom and how it applies to the world of work.

You are their support and Skills Development Scotland can be yours.

We are working closely with Education Scotland to develop a series of professional learning resources linked directly to the Career Education Standard. These will help you develop and maintain your awareness of the labour market, different learning and career pathways and the employability skills young people need to develop.

Whether you’re working at a nursery, in a primary or secondary setting, at a college, as a private training provider, a social worker, as part of the third sector or community learning and development, or in a specialist learning or residential setting – these resources are for you.

You can now access the first of what will be a suite of four modules through Education Scotland’s website.

It will help you to understand the purpose and aim of the Career Education Standard, the entitlements for children and young people and the role you’re expected to play along with parents and partners.

Two further modules will be added in April.

The first looks at Labour Market Information (LMI), the facts and figures that show us where job opportunities will be, and in what sectors in Scotland. For example, LMI tells us a predicted 11,000 BBC Make it Digitalnew jobs will open up each year until 2020 in Scotland’s digital technology sector. The module will provide you with an understanding of LMI, how to access it, how to use it in the classroom and the benefits it brings for a young person’s learning.

The second is on Career Management Skills (CMS). These are the skills that young people need to help them make informed career decisions throughout their lives. SDS Careers Advisers focus on identifying an individual’s career management skills, and those they need to develop further, during coaching sessions. These are also skills that can and should be developed across the curriculum as a day-to-day aspect of learning.

Homepage 1By the end of May the fourth and final resource will look at My World of Work and the resources it offers teachers and practitioners. My World of Work is already widely used by pastoral care and guidance staff but this resource will explore how all teachers can use it to access valuable information about learning and career pathways and the current and future labour market.

These four learning resources can be used independently, relatively informally with a small group of self-selected colleagues or more formally as part of an agreed area for improvement across a department or the whole school.

Through this process of awareness-raising and individual or collaborative reflection, we hope you will be better able to consider how the entitlements and expectations described in the Career Education Standard relate to your current practice and better equip you to more fully integrate learning about the world of work into your lessons in a way that is proportionate, manageable and sustainable.

Skills Development Scotland supports the implementation of the Career Education Standard – by Ken Edwards⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The Career Education Standard is going to make it easier for you to Career Education Standardweave career education progressively through the curriculum from 3 to 18.

Published in September 2015, the Standard addresses the ambition to reduce youth unemployment by better preparing young people for the world of work and is a direct response to one of the recommendations in Education Working for All! The standard reflects existing Curriculum for Excellence guidance; most obviously, in relation to Building the Curriculum 4: Skills for learning, life and work but also in delivering some of the health and wellbeing outcomes that are, of course, the responsibility of all.

At the heart of the new Standard lies a set of entitlements for all learners and a corresponding set of expectations for each of the four key influencers in young peoples’ learning and career choices: you as teachers or education practitioners; parents and carers; employers and, of course, Skills Development Scotland (SDS) the national skills agency.

I know from previous experience that the landscape of Scottish education can sometimes appear cluttered with seemingly unconnected new initiatives that compete for limited development time. Therefore, it’s heartening to know that as schools begin to deliver the entitlements and expectations described in this new Standard it will also help them address some of the other current priorities in Scottish education.

A significant body of research shows more systematic and progressive delivery of quality career education works on two fronts. Firstly it helps young people to develop the essential career management skills needed to successfully navigate the increasingly complex and extended transition from school into further learning, training or employment. Secondly, it has more immediate positive impacts by helping to set learning in a relevant real-life context so raising learners’ engagement and motivation. In turn, this leads to measurable improvements in achievement and attainment and makes a valuable contribution to closing the attainment gap. All of which are priorities in Scottish Government’s new National Improvement Framework.

Support for you

The Career Education Standard acknowledges and builds on the existing good practice seen in classrooms across Scotland and aspires to make this common practice in future.

Fortunately, with such an ambition, you are not alone in implementing the Standard. SDS and other partners are working hard to provide additional guidance and support to help you develop young people’s skills for life and work and so ensure that DYW sustainably improves learning experiences and outcomes for all.

SDS’s team of expert Careers Advisers have started working with pupils from an earlier stage; beginning at the point of transition from P7 to S1 and continuing to be involved at all stages until the end of school. They offer a combination of group and one-to-one activities geared to developing the essential career management skills that help young people make informed learning and career choices providing a valuable complement to school career education programmes. We have been working in close collaboration with Education Scotland and a number of primary, secondary and additional support needs schools across Scotland to develop, test and refine this support.

We know young people are going online for information and help. Only last week Childwise figures showed 7-16 year olds are spending 3 hours a day on line, that’s up to 4.8 hours for 15 to 16 year olds. This growing trend coincides with the news that SDS’s digital resource is already being significantly enhanced, with more on the way (to come??). This includes the updated and more intuitive version of My World of Work, our award-winning careers information and advice web service, which launched on 25 January.

There will also be a new dedicated digital offer aimed at CfE second level (P5-7) and an exploration of how P7 pupils can best use My World of Work. These digital resources are accompanied by a range of support materials that can help teachers and pupils to better connect learning in and beyond the classroom to the world of work.

SDS is also working to enhance practitioners’ confidence and skills in the area of career education. We are working with Education Scotland to develop a suite of learning resources that will support career-long professional learning. These will be gradually rolled out over the coming months and will focus on getting to know the Standard, how to make effective use of My World of Work, career management skills and also an insight into career and labour market intelligence and how to access current information.

SDS will also be able to further support schools in engaging and working with employers, and along with the National Parent Forum of Scotland have already developed a guide for parents to career education in schools.

Coming up

Over the coming months you’ll hear more from my colleagues in SDS on each of these areas and the progress that’s being made.

In March we’ll update you on the launch of the re-developed My World of Work and the new and improved tools and content as well as plans for the future.’

Useful Links

Read the Career Education Standard

Find out more about Skills Development Scotland

Get the help you need for the career you want at My World of Work

See the National Parent Forum of Scotland nutshell guide Career Education: A World of Possibilities

Building the Curriculum 4

Education Working for All!