Tag Archives: Scottish Attainment Challenge

Why are creativity skills important for attainment? – new Creativity JPEGS available for use in presentations, reports, posters and online.⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The following JPEGs are drawn from the Why are creativity skills important for attainment? infographic available on the National Improvement Hub.

Please use and share the images as widely as possible with educators, learners and partners in presentations, reports, posters and online.

You can also build your own infographics from scratch using the Everything Is Creative online tool and make your own use of the artwork you see here.

why-are-creativity-skills-important-to-attainment successful-learners responsible-citizens confident-individuals effective-contributors with-curiosity-we-can-be-successful-learners with-imagination-we-can-be-confident-individuals with-open-mindedness-we-can-be-responsible-citizens with-problem-solving-skills-we-can-be-effective-contributors with-problem-solving-skills-we-can-be-effective-contributors2 Why are creativity skills important for attainment? the-tree themes-wheel roots foundations creative ownership motivation independence engagement i-just-learn-what-im-interested-in

Why are creativity skills important for attainment? – new Creativity JPEGS available for use in presentations, reports, posters and online.⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The following JPEGs are drawn from the Why are creativity skills important for attainment? infographic available on the National Improvement Hub.

Please use and share the images as widely as possible with educators, learners and partners in presentations, reports, posters and online.

You can also build your own infographics from scratch using the Everything Is Creative online tool and make your own use of the artwork you see here.

why-are-creativity-skills-important-to-attainment successful-learners responsible-citizens confident-individuals effective-contributors with-curiosity-we-can-be-successful-learners with-imagination-we-can-be-confident-individuals with-open-mindedness-we-can-be-responsible-citizens with-problem-solving-skills-we-can-be-effective-contributors with-problem-solving-skills-we-can-be-effective-contributors2 Why are creativity skills important for attainment? the-tree themes-wheel roots foundations creative ownership motivation independence engagement i-just-learn-what-im-interested-in

A Further Discussion With John Swinney MSP⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Small - Further DFMJoin John Swinney in another Glow TV event to discuss ways to reduce teacher workload on Tuesday 13th September at 6.15pm. You will have the opportunity to ask questions live to Mr Swinney or submit a question prior to the event.

To follow up his recent Glow Meet, John Swinney MSP, Deputy First Minister and Cabinet Secretary for Education and Skills, is offering an additional opportunity to education practitioners to discuss Curriculum for Excellence, the recently published Statement and Benchmarks, and other actions to help reduce teacher workload. He will be joined by Graeme Logan, Strategic Director, who was actively involved in developing the Statement and Benchmarks, and who is currently leading the Scottish Attainment Challenge for Education Scotland.

Once again, the questions will come from Scotland’s teachers and education practitioners. If you can’t take part on Tuesday, please send a question in advance to Jennifer.mckay@educationscotland.gsi.gov.uk. We will do our best to answer as many questions as we can during the Glow Meet and we will publish answers to any questions that we don’t manage to address.

Sign up now to take part live in Glow TV – A Further Discussion with John Swinney MSP

If you unable to join us for the live event you can always catch up with the recording at another time – Glow TV’s Watch Again.

If you do one thing this term; collaborate⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

JanieBy Janie McManus, Assistant Director in charge of the Scottish Attainment Challenge

Welcome back after the holidays! It’s always an exciting time of year, and one when we’re looking ahead to the difference we will make to the lives of children across Scotland. When I was in the classroom I always remember the first day with a new class of children and both the excitement and anxiety about getting to know them quickly and thinking about the difference that I could make to their learning over the coming year.  One of the strengths of the school was working alongside my colleagues to share ideas, resources and talk about ways I could make my teaching and learning better.  Learning from each other about effective practice to raise attainment and close the poverty related attainment gap is a key feature of the Scottish Attainment Challenge.

On the Scottish Attainment Challenge, we’re heading into our second year. This time last year we had just appointed our first Attainment Advisors. As they have become established, they are working collaboratively across groupings of local authorities as well as working with individual schools and local authorities.

With a well-established full team, we are learning about what is working. That includes the impact on the vocabulary gap in Dundee of speech and language therapists working alongside teachers, and the value of CLPL on literacy for practitioners in Inverclyde.

Both are featured in the August edition of GTCS’s Teaching Scotland magazine, as the publication follows the progress of the Attainment Advisors in these two authorities.

In both examples, collaboration has been key, and one factor that keeps being highlighted by the Attainment Advisors is the value of sharing practice with colleagues, whether informally or formally through professional learning networks. I have been impressed by the approaches being used to develop professional learning and enquiry and the use of collaborative action research.

The anecdotal experience is backed up by research. A recently published paper by Professor Chris Chapman, Senior Academic Advisor to the Scottish Attainment Challenge, has demonstrated that collaborative working has a positive impact on personnel, facilitating improvements in many aspects of practice, which in turn has a positive impact on learner attainment.

If you are looking for ideas, both publications are a good place to start; or you could simply catch up with colleagues in and beyond your classroom and school and start the invaluable process of sharing your questions and experiences; and collaborating.

Key links

Collaborative Learning⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Small- Scottish Attainment Challenge

Join Carol Wood on Friday 6th May at 1pm as she discusses the nature and effect size of collaborative learning with regard to the Scottish Attainment Challenge. Exploring the impact of learning gains through using a structured approach to well-designed tasks within a wide range of approaches to collaborative and co-operative learning.

Sign up and join us live on the day – Collaborative Learning

If you unable to join us for the live event you can always catch up with the recording at another time – Glow TV’s Watch Again.

Learner Peer Tutoring⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Small- Scottish Attainment ChallengeJoin Carol Wood on Friday 22nd April at 1pm as she discusses the current definition for peer tutoring and exploring its effect size on learning with regard to the Scottish Attainment Challenge. Whether working in pairs or in small groups, structured peer-assisted tutoring facilitates clear support in learning and boosts attainment.

Register to take part live – Learner Peer Tutoring

If you unable to join us for the live event you can always catch up with the recording at another time – Glow TV’s Watch Again.