Tag Archives: science

The Big Bang Fair Scotland⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

the-big-bang-logo

Location: Perth College UHI

Date: Tuesday 13 Jun, 2017

The Big Bang Near Me programme plays a vital role in inspiring the UK’s future scientists and engineers at a regional, local and school level. We encourage more people to take these subjects, as well as celebrating young people’s achievements in science and engineering through displaying their STEM projects and letting them talk with engineers and scientists, face to face.

The UK needs many more scientists and engineers and equipping young people with skills in science, technology, engineering and maths is key to their future employability. Students attending a Near Me fair really enjoy themselves too – with nine out of ten rating the event they attended as “good” or “very good”.

Zones will include:

  • Engineering
  • Construction
  • Food and Drink
  • Science and Maths
  • Career Zone – Companies to provide careers advise in their sector.
  • 15 minute presentation slots available to address small groups of young people.

There will also be a chance to experience a selection of STEM challenges available to schools including the ‘turbo charged’ National Final of the Bloodhound Scotland Rocket Car Challenge and Scottish Big Bang Competition final.

If you would like to attend this event please contact Energy Skills Partnership at info@esp-scotland.ac.uk

 

 

Resources for science – Sound⤴

from

By: adzla

After teaching a unit of work on light, I taught a unit of work on sound. Here are the links and resources I used.

 

Idea for creating a educational programme about sound – quite a nice idea. https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B7O6aW7yE47bdkZnVENUOFF2T0U

 

Covers a lot of sound stuff Teachers TV: Primary Science: Sound and Hearing

 

 

 

 

How Your Ears Work

 

 

http://thekidshouldseethis.com/post/a-speeding-toy-train-plays-the-william-tell-overture-on-bottles

 

http://thekidshouldseethis.com/post/opera-singers-sing-during-real-time-mri-scans

 

http://thekidshouldseethis.com/post/the-wintergatan-marble-machine-music-made-from-2000-marbles

 

http://thekidshouldseethis.com/post/the-inverted-glass-harp

 

http://thekidshouldseethis.com/post/43232464676

 

Bill Nye https://vimeo.com/111148958

 

BBC Sound Clips http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/topics/zgffr82/videos/1

Gender balance in STEM⤴

from @ Engage for Education

Today the Minister for Further and Higher Education and Science, Shirley-Anne Somerville, led a roundtable discussion with Scotland’s Chief Scientific Adviser, Sheila Rowan, about gender inequality in STEM fields.

They were joined at the Scottish Parliament by representatives from across the sector to discuss actions to tackle the issue as part of the ongoing STEM consultation but also to share some of the great examples already in place throughout the country.

Deputy Head Teacher of Woodmill High School, Zoe Thomson, explained how the school is working with Gender Balance Scotland to encourage not just students, but parents and teachers too in tackling stereotyping in subject choice and career pathways.

Deputy Headteacher of Woodmill High School Zoe Thomson

Deputy Headteacher of Woodmill High School Zoe Thomson

 

 

The first step we took to a cultural shift was to put gender balance onto the remit of a Deputy Head Teacher, this allows gender balance to form part of the whole school improvement planning process. This is important as it enables us to have an overview of the strategic planning in order to involve partners, track progress and interrogate data.

“At Woodmill we have been lucky enough to be part of Shell’s Girls in Energy project. Last session 7 girls from S4-S6 attended Fife College one afternoon a week to look at the work undertaken in the energy industries. The girls took part in industrial visits and met with other students and apprentices, they also earned a National 5 skills for work unit for taking part. The partnership with Shell and Fife College has been crucial in the success of this project providing the students with a taste of “college life” and the opportunity to meet female engineers.

“One of our students from an earlier session has successfully secured an apprenticeship at Leonardo (formerly SELEX). Olivia was supported by members of Equate Scotland during her application and interview process which really helped her confidence and provided additional support we couldn’t offer within school. Another of our former students who took part in an earlier session has gone on to study Civil Engineering at Heriot Watt. Now both girls are  role models for our next cohort leading to 14 girls signing up for the 2016/17 session.

“Feedback from the girls has also been incredibly positive:

“This has shown me engineering is not about getting your hands dirty but more about creative problem solving.” – Sarah M S5                            

                                                         Caitlyn S4 – “I am not sure what I want to do but this has given me more options.”

 

 

“I have had more confidence to offer answers without the intimidation of boys.” – Millie S4

woodmill-high“As a school we work hard to create links with partners and Skills Development Scotland has helped us arrange talks from female apprentices. We have found this is more powerful when the speaker is close in age to the audience and also targeting a smaller group of girls rather than an entire year group.

“Girls rarely make their subject choice in isolation so our next challenge is to work on the unconscious bias and misinformation in parents and teachers. Pupils really only know about a small range of careers and we are working with our partners in Early years to begin to broaden these horizons from age three to ensure girls have equal access to STEM opportunities and the benefits they can bring.”

 

 

 

Resources for science – light.⤴

from

My new headteacher introduced me to Onenote and after having a look at it, I realised that it would be a good way to collate resources for different subjects and topics in school.

In a few months I’ve built up lots of pages of links with brief descriptions of what the link is.

I’m going to share these resources I’ve collated and used on my blog space here.

I hope you find them useful.

I’m going to start with some links I used for our science topic on Light.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/topics/zbssgk7/videos/1 class clips

 

http://thekidshouldseethis.com/post/pattern-distortions-seen-through-a-glass-of-water

 

http://thekidshouldseethis.com/post/79356632627  Reversing arrow experiment

 

http://thekidshouldseethis.com/post/52798138998 Optical cloaking

 

http://thekidshouldseethis.com/post/71224654988 T-rex

 

http://thekidshouldseethis.com/post/60505868597 Can you trust your eyes?

 

http://thekidshouldseethis.com/post/how-do-animals-see-in-the-dark-color-ted-ed How do animals see (and humans for that matter)

http://thekidshouldseethis.com/post/how-do-glasses-help-us-see-ted-ed Human eyes and glasses.

 

http://thekidshouldseethis.com/post/how-do-your-eyes-see-color-physics-girl How do your eyes see colour?

 

http://www.color-blindness.com/color-blindness-tests/ Colour vision tests

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/ks2/science/physical_processes/light/read/1/ Bitesize Light.

Nobel Prize in Chemistry⤴

from @ Engage for Education

Following the announcement that Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Sir J. Fraser Stoddart and Bernard L. Feringa have been awarded this year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry the Minister for Further Education, Higher Education and Science, Shirley-Anne Somerville has offered her congratulations. The team won the prize in recognition for their pioneering work in nanotechnology, in particular the design and production of molecular machines. Sir Fraser Stoddart was born and raised in Edinburgh and attended the University of Edinburgh where an annual Stoddart Prize is awarded each year to recognise young researchers.

Ms Somerville said:

“I’m delighted for all the winners of this year’s Nobel Prize for Chemistry. Their work in connection with the development of molecular machines is truly ground-breaking and could have significant applications to healthcare in the future. Sir Fraser Stoddart retains strong links with the University of Edinburgh and I am sure that his success will energise and encourage students there and across Scotland.”

World Teachers’ Day⤴

from @ Engage for Education

It’s World Teachers’ Day and Education Secretary John Swinney marked the occasion with a visit to Dalgety Bay Primary School, where he met teachers and pupils and opened the school’s new Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics (STEAM) laboratory.

While there he said: “I would like to take the opportunity this World Teachers’ Day to thank our highly skilled and extremely motivated teaching staff throughout Scotland.

“Since taking up post as Education Secretary I have visited schools across the country, meeting with a wide range of teaching professionals and the young people who so clearly value the work they do. These visits have only served to reinforce my view that our teaching workforce provides the bedrock of an education system our country can be proud of.

“I strongly believe that if Scotland is to continue to flourish we Dalgetyneed dedicated, passionate, teachers inspiring our young people for generations to come and I hope the rest of the country, young and old, will join me today in showing appreciation for all our teachers, past and present, for the life changing work they do.”
 

 

 

Nobel Prize in Physics⤴

from @ Engage for Education

Minister for Further Education, Higher Education and Science, Shirley-Anne Somerville, has congratulated David Thouless, Duncan Haldane and Michael Kosterlitz – the team awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics – for their work on strange forms of matter.  Two of the winners – David Thouless and Michael Kosterlitz – were born in Scotland.

Ms Somerville said:

“Congratulations to all three winners of the Nobel Prize for Physics for their work on states of matter, and I’m particularly pleased that two of the winners were born here in Scotland. I hope their achievements help to inspire our next generation of scientists.”

You can read more about the award here

Why we need to reform assessment⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

[Originally posted on stuckwithphysics.co.uk on 31st OCtober 2015] Following on from my post back in May ‘Do Exams Pass Under CfE?‘, I have given the issues of assessment and certification some further consideration, which I discussed in my presentation at this year’s Teachmeet SLF ‘Breakout’ event held at CitizenM, Glasgow back in September. This post […]

What science knows vs what education does⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

What is the longest period of time you can focus your attention without your mind beginning to wander and your concentration plummeting off a cliff? Wikipedia states that the maximum attention span for the average human is 5 minutes.  The longest time for healthy teenagers and adults is 20 minutes. However, according to the National […]

Bringing life into biology lessons: using the fruit fly Drosophila as a powerful modern teaching tool⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

Introduction In biomedical research, small model organisms such as the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster are important pillars in the process of scientific discovery. I have been using Drosophila as my organism of choice and my essential discovery tool to study fundamental principles of the nervous system [LINK1, LINK2] for 26 years. Together with my colleague […]