Tag Archives: resource description

Book chapter: Technology Strategies for Open Educational Resource Dissemination⤴

from @ Sharing and learning

A book with a chapter by Lorna M Campbell and I has just been published. The book is Open Education: International Perspectives in Higher Education edited by Patrick Blessinger and TJ Bliss, published by Open Book Publishers.

There are contributions by people I know and look up to in the OER world, and some equally good chapters by folk I had not come across before. It seems to live up to its billing of offering an international perspective by not being US-centric (though it would be nice to see more from S America, Asia and Africa), and it provides a wide view of Open Education, not limited to Open Education Resources. There is a foreword by David Wiley, a chapter on a human rights theory for open education by the editors, one on whether emancipation through open education is theory or rhetoric by Andy Lane. Other people from the Open University’s Open Education team (Martin Weller, Beatriz de los Arcos, Rob Farrow, Rebecca Pitt and Patrick McAndrew) have written about identifying categories of OER users.  There are chapters on aspects such as open science, open text books, open assessment and credentials for open learning; and several case studies and reflections on open education in practice.

Open Education: International Perspectives in Higher Education is available under a CC:BY licence as a free PDF, as very cheap mobi or ePub, or reasonably priced soft and hard back editions. You should get a copy from the publishers.

Technology Strategies for OER

The chapter that Lorna and I wrote is an overview drawing on our experiences through the UKOER programme and our work on LRMI looking at managing the dissemination and discovery of open education resources. Here’s the abstract in full, and a link to the final submitted version of our chapter.

This chapter addresses issues around the discovery and use of Open Educational Resources (OER) by presenting a state of the art overview of technology strategies for the description and dissemination of content as OER. These technology strategies include institutional repositories and websites, subject specific repositories, sites for sharing specific types of content (such as video, images, ebooks) and general global repositories. There are also services that aggregate content from a range of collections, these may specialize by subject, region or resource type. A number of examples of these services are analyzed in terms of their scope, how they present resources, the technologies they use and how they promote and support a community of users. The variety of strategies for resource description taken by these platforms is also discussed. These range from formal machine-readable metadata to human readable text. It is argued that resource description should not be seen as a purely technical activity. Library and information professionals have much to contribute, however academics could also make a valuable contribution to open educational resource (OER) description if the established good practice of identifying the provenance and aims of scholarly works is applied to learning resources. The current rate of change among repositories is quite startling with several repositories and applications having either shut down or having changed radically in the year or so that the work on which this contribution is based took. With this in mind, the chapter concludes with a few words on sustainability.

Preprint of full chapter (MS Word)

The post Book chapter: Technology Strategies for Open Educational Resource Dissemination appeared first on Sharing and learning.

HECoS, a new subject coding system for Higher Education⤴

from @ Sharing and learning

You may have missed that just before Christmas HECoS (the Higher Education Classification of Subjects) was announced. I worked a little on the project that lead up to this, along with colleagues in Cetis (who lead the project), Alan Paull Serices and Gill Ferrell, so I am especially pleased to see it come to fruition. I believe that as a flexible classification scheme built on semantic web / linked data principles it is a significant contribution to how we share data in HE.

HECoS was commissioned as part of the Higher Education Data & Information Improvement Programme (HEDIIP) in order to find a replacement to JACS, the subject coding scheme currently used in UK HE when information from different institutions needs to be classified by subject. When I was first approached by Gill Ferrell while she was working on a preliminary study of to determine if it needed changing, my initial response was that something which was much more in tune with semantic web principles would be very welcome (see the second part of this post that I wrote back in 2013). HECoS has been designed from the outset to be semantic web friendly. Also, one of the issues identified by the initial study was that aggregation of subjects was politically sensitive. For starters, the level of funding can depend on whether a subject is, for example, a STEM subject or not; but there are also factors of how universities as institutions are organised into departments/faculties/schools and how academics identify with disciplines. These lead to unnecessary difficulties in subject classification of courses: it is easy enough to decide whether a course is about ‘actuarial science’ but deciding whether ‘actuarial science’ should be grouped under ‘business studies’ or ‘mathematics’ is strongly context dependent. One of the decisions taken in designing HECoS was to separate the politics of how to aggregate subjects from the descriptions of those subjects and their more general relationships to each other. This is in marked contrast to JACS where the aggregation was baked into the very identifiers used. That is not to say that aggregation hierarchies aren’t important or won’t exist: they are, and they will, indeed there is already one for the purpose of displaying subjects for navigation, but they will be created through a governance process that can consider the politics involved separately from describing the subjects. This should make the subject classification terms more widely usable, allowing institutions and agencies who use it to build hierarchies for presentation and analysis that meet their own needs if these are different from those represented by the process responsible for the standard hierarchy. A more widely used classification scheme will have benefits for the information improvement envisaged by HEDIIP.

The next phase of HECoS will be about implementation and adoption, for example the creation of the governance processes detailed in the reports, moving HECoS up to proper 5-star linked data, help with migration from JACS to HECoS and so on. There’s a useful summary report on the HEDIIP site, and a spreadsheet of the coding system itself. There’s also still the development version Cetis used for consultation, which better represents its semantic webbiness but is non-definitive and temporary.

Presentation: LRMI – using schema.org to facilitate educational resource discovery on the web and beyond⤴

from @ Sharing and learning

Today I am in London for the ISKO Knowledge Organisation in Learning and Teaching meeting, where I am presenting on LRMI and schema.org to facilitate educational resource discovery on the web and beyond. My slides are here, mostly they cover similar ground to presentations I’ve given before which have been captured on video or which I have written up in more detail. So here I’ll just point to my slides for today and summarise the new stuff.

LRMI uptake

People always want to know how much LRMI exists in the wild, and now schema.org reports this infomation. Go to the schema.org page for any class or property and at the top it says in how many domains they find markup for it. Obviously this misses that not all domains are equal in extent or importance: finding LRMI on pjjk,net should not count as equal to finding it on bbc.co.uk, but as a broad indicator it’s OK: finding a property on 10 domains or 10,000 domains is a valid comarison. LRMI properties are mostly reported as found on 100-1000 domains (e.g. learning resource type) or 10-100 domains (e.g. educational alignment). A couple of LRMI properties have greater usage, e.g. typical age range and is based on URL (10-50,00 and 1-10,000 domains respectively), but I guess that reflects their generic usefulness beyond learning resources. We know that in some cases LRMI is used for internal systems but not exposed on web pages, but still the level of usage is not as high as we would like.

I also often get asked about support for creating LRMI metadata, this time I’m including a mention of how it is possible to write WordPress plugins and themes with schema / LRMI support, and the drupal schema.org plugin. I’m also aware of “tagging tools” associated with various repositories, e.g. the learning registry and the Illinois Shared Learning Environment. I think it’s always going to be difficult to answer this one as the best support will always come from customising whatever CMS an organisation uses to manage their content or metadata and will be tailored to their workflow and the types of resources and educational contexts they work in.

As far implementation for search I still cover google custom search, as in the previous presentations.

Current LRMI activities

The DCMI LRMI task group is active, one of our priorities is to improve the support for people who want to use LRMI. Two activities are nearing fruitition: firstly, we are hoping to provide examples for relevant properties and type on the schema.org web site. Secondly, we want to provide better support for the vocabularies used for properties such as alignment type (in the Alignment Object), learning resource type etc, by way of clear definitions and machine readable vocabulary encodings (using SKOS). We are asking for public review and comment on LRMI vocabularies, so please take a look and get in touch.

Other work in progress is around schema for courses and extending some of the vocabularies mentioned above. We have monthly calls, if you would like to lend a hand please do get in touch.

WordPress as a semantic web platform?⤴

from @ Sharing and learning

For the work we’ve been doing on semantic description of courses we needed a platform for creating and editing instance data flexibly and easily. We looked at callimachus and Semantic MediaWiki; in the end we went with the latter because of JAVA version incompatibility problems with the other, but it has been a bit of a struggle. I’ve used WordPress for publishing information about resources on a couple of projects, for Cetis publications and for learning resources, and have been very happy with it. WordPress handles the general task of publishing stuff on the web really well, it is easily extensible through plugins and themes, I have nearly always found plugins that allow me to do what I want and themes that with a little customization allow me to present the information how I want. As a piece of open source software it is used on a massive scale (about a quarter of all web domains use it) and has the development effort and user support to match. For the previous projects my approach was to have a post for each resource I wanted to describe and to set the title, publication date and author to be those for the resource, I used the main body of the post for a description and used tags and categories for classification, e.g. by topic or resource type; other metadata could be added using WordPress’s Custom Fields, more or less as free text name-value pairs. While I had modified themes so that  the semantics of some of this information was marked up with microdata or RDFa embedded in the HTML, I was aware that WordPress allowed for more than I was doing.

The possibility of using WordPress for creating and publishing semantic data hinges on two capabilities that I hadn’t used before: firstly the ability to create custom post types so that for each resource type there can be a corresponding post type; secondly the ability to create custom metadata fields that go beyond free text. I used these in conjunction with a theme which is a child theme of the current default, TwentyFifteen, which sets up the required custom types and displays them. Because I am familiar with it and it is quite general purpose, I chose the schema.org ontology to implement, but I think the ideas in this post would be applicable to any RDF vocabulary. When creating examples I had in mind a dataset describing the books that I own and the authors I am interested in.

I started by using a plugin, Custom Post Type UI, to create the post types I wanted but eventually was doing enough in php as a theme extensions (see below) that it made sense just to add a function to create the the post types. This drops the dependency on the plugin (though it’s a good one) and means the theme works from the outset without requiring custom types to be set up manually.

add_action( 'init', 'create_creativework_type' );
function create_creativework_type() {
  register_post_type( 'creativework',
    array(
      'labels' => array(
        'name' => __( 'Creative Works' ),
        'singular_name' => __( 'Creative Work' )
      ),
      'public' => true,
      'has_archive' => true,
      'rewrite' => array('slug' => 'creativework'),
      'supports' => array('title', 'thumbnail', 'revisions' )
    )
  );
}

The key call here is to the WP function register_post_type() which is used to create a post type with the same name as the schema.org resource type / class; so I have one of these for each of the schema.org types I use (so far Thing, CreativeWork, Book and Person). This is hooked into the WordPress init process so it is done by the time you need those post types.

I do use a plugin to help create the custom metadata fields for every property except the name property (for which I use the title of the post). Meta Box extends the WordPress API with some functions that make creating metadata fields in php much easier. These metadata fields can be tailored for particular data types, e.g. text, dates, numbers, urls and, crucially, links to other posts. That last one gives you what you need for to create relationships between the resources you describe in WordPress, which can expressed as triples. Several of these custom fields can be grouped together into a “meta box” and attached as a group to specific post types so that they are displayed when editing posts of those types. Here’s what declaring a custom metadata field for the author relationship between a CreativeWork and a Person looks like with MetaBox (for simplicity I’ve omitted the code I have for declaring the other properties of a Creative Work and some of the optional parameters). I’m using the author property as an example because a repeatable link to another resource is about as complicated a property as you get.

function semwp_register_creativework_meta_boxes( $meta_boxes )
{
    $prefix = 'semwp_creativework_';

    // 1st meta box
    $meta_boxes[] = array(
        'id'         => 'main_creativework_info',
        'title'      => __( 'Main properties of a schema.org Creative Work', 'semwp_creativework_' ),
        // attach this box to the following post types
        'post_types' => array('creativework', 'book' ),

	// List of meta fields
	'fields'     => array(
            // Author
            // Link to posts of type Person.
            array(
                'name'        => __( 'Author (person)', 'semwp_creativework_' ),
                'id'          => "{$prefix}authors",
                'type'        => 'post',
                'post_type'   => 'person',
                'placeholder' => __( 'Select an Item', 'semwp_creativework_' ),
            // set clone to true for repeatable fields
            'clone' => true
            ),
        ),
    );
    return $meta_boxes;
}

What this gives when editing a post of type book is this:

semwpeditshot

WordPress uses a series of nested templates to display content, which are defined in the theme and can either be specific to a post type or generic, the generic ones being used as a fall back if a more specific one does not exist. As I mentioned I use a child theme of TwentyFifteen which means that I only have to include those files that I change from the parent. To display the main content of posts of type book I need a file called content-book.php (the rest of the page is common to all types of post), which looks like this




<article resource="?<?php the_ID() ; ?>#id" id="?<?php the_ID(); ?>" <?php post_class(); ?> vocab="http://schema.org/" typeof="Book">



<header class="entry-header">
    <?php
        if ( is_single() ) :
            the_title( '


<h1 class="entry-title" property="name">', '<;/h1>' );
        else :
            the_title( sprintf( '


<h2 class="entry-title"><;a href="%s" rel="bookmark">', esc_url( get_permalink() ) ), '</a></h2>


;' );
        endif;
    ?>
</header>




<div class="entry-content">
    <?php semwp_print_creativework_author(); ?>
    <?php semwp_print_book_bookEdition(); ?>
    <?php semwp_print_book_numberOfPages(); ?>
    <?php semwp_print_book_isbn(); ?>
    <?php semwp_print_book_illustrator(); ?>
    <?php semwp_print_creativework_datePublished(); ?>
    <?php semwp_print_book_bookFormat(); ?>
    <?php semwp_print_creativework_sameAs(); ?></div>




<footer class="entry-footer">
    <?php twentyfifteen_entry_meta(); ?>
    <?php edit_post_link( __( 'Edit', 'twentyfifteen' ), '<span class="edit-link">', '</span>' ); ?>
    <?php semwp_print_extract_rdf_links(); ?>
</footer>



</article>



Note the RDFa in some of the html tags, for example the <article> tag includes

resource= [url]#id vocab="http://schema.org/" typeof="Book"

and the title is output in an <h1> tag with the

property="name"

attribute. Exposing semantic data as RDFa is one (good) thing, but what about other formats? A useful web service called RDF Translator helps here. It has an API which allowed me to put a link at the foot of each resource page to the semantic data from that page in formats such as RDF/XML, N3 and JSON-LD; it’s quite not what you would want for fully fledged semantic data publishing but it does show the different views of the data that can be extracted from what is published.

Also note that most of the content is printed through calls to php functions that I defined for each property, semwp_print_creativework_author() looks like this (again a repeatable link to another resource is about as complex as it gets:

function semwp_print_alink($id) {
     if (get_the_title($id))       //it's a object with a title
     {
         echo sprintf('<a property="url" href="%s"><span property="name">%s</span></a>', esc_url(get_permalink($id)), get_the_title($id) );
     }
     else                          //treat it as a url
     {
         echo sprintf('<a href="%s">%s</a>', esc_url($id), $id );
     }
}
function semwp_print_creativework_author()
{
    if ( rwmb_meta( 'semwp_creativework_authors' ) )
    {
	echo '

By: ';
	$authors = rwmb_meta( 'semwp_creativework_authors' );
        foreach ( $authors as $author )
        {
               echo '<span property="author" typeof="Person">';
               semwp_print_alink($author);
               echo '</span>';
        }
        echo '

';
    }
}

So in summary, for each resource type I have two files of php/html code: one which sets up a custom post type, custom metadata fields for the properties of that type (and any other types which inherit them) and includes some functions that facilitate the output of instance data as HTML with RDFa; and another file which is the WordPress template for presenting that data. Apart from a few generally useful functions related to output as HTML and modifications to other theme files (mostly to remove embedded data which I found distracting) that’s all that is required.

The result looks like this:

Note, this image is linked to the page on wordpress that is shows, click on it if you want to explore the little data that there is there, but please do be aware that it is a development site which won't always be working properly.
Note, this image is linked to the page on my WordPress install that it shows, click on it if you want to explore the little data that there is there, but please do be aware that it is a development site which won’t always be working properly.

And here’s the N3 rendering of the data in that page as converted by RDF Translator:

@prefix rdf: <http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#> .
@prefix rdfa: <http://www.w3.org/ns/rdfa#> .
@prefix rdfs: <http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#> .
@prefix schema: <http://schema.org/> .
@prefix xml: <http://www.w3.org/XML/1998/namespace> .
@prefix xsd: <http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#> .

<http://www.pjjk.net/semanticwp/book/the-day-of-the-triffids> rdfa:usesVocabulary schema: .

<http://www.pjjk.net/semanticwp/book/the-day-of-the-triffids?36#id> a schema:Book ;
    schema:author [ a schema:Person ;
            schema:name "John Wyndham"@en-gb ;
            schema:url <http://www.pjjk.net/semanticwp/person/john-wyndham> ] ;
    schema:bookEdition "Popular penguins (2011)"@en-gb ;
    schema:bookFormat ""@en-gb ;
    schema:datePublished "2011-09-01"^^xsd:date ;
    schema:illustrator [ a schema:Person ;
            schema:name "John Griffiths"@en-gb ;
            schema:url <http://www.pjjk.net/semanticwp/person/john-griffiths> ] ;
    schema:isbn "0143566539"@en-gb ;
    schema:name "The day of the triffids"@en-gb ;
    schema:numberOfPages 256 ;
    schema:sameAs "http://www.amazon.co.uk/Day-Triffids-Popular-Penguins/dp/0143566539/"@en-gb,
        "https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=zlqAZwEACAAJ"@en-gb .

Further work: Ideas and a Problem

There’s a ton of other stuff that I can think of that could be done with this, from the simple, e.g. extend the range of types supported, to the challenging, e.g. exploring ways of importing data or facilitating / automating the creation of new post types from known ontologies, output in other formats, providing a SPARQL end point &c &c… Also, I suspect that much of what I have implemented in a theme would be better done as a plugin.

There is one big problem that I only vaguely see a way around, and that is illustrated above in the screenshot of the editing interface for the ‘about’ property. The schema.org/about property has an expected type of schema.org/Thing; schema.org types are hierarchical, which means the value for about can be a Thing or any subtype of Thing (which is to say of any type). This sort of thing isn’t unique to schema.org. However, the MetaBox plugin I use will only allow links to be made to posts of one specific type, and I suspect that reflects something about how WordPress organises posts of different custom types. I don’t think there is any way of asking it to show posts from a range of different types and I don’t think there is any way of saying that posts of type person are also of type thing and so on.  In practice this means that at the moment I can only enter data that shows books as being about unspecific Things; I cannot, for example, say that a biography is a book about a Person. I can only see clunky ways around this.

[Aside: the big consumers of schema data (Google, Bing, Yahoo, Yandex) will also permit text values for most properties and try to make what sense of it they can, so you could say that for any property either a string literal or a link to another resource should be permitted. This, I think, is a peculiarity of schema.org. The screenshot above of the data input form shows that the about field is repeated to provide the option of a text-only value, an approach hinting at one of the clunky unscalable solutions to the general problem described above.]

What next? I might set a student project around addressing some of these extensions. If you know a way around the selecting different type problem please do drop me a line. Other than that I can see myself extending this work slowly if it proves useful for other stuff, like creating examples of pages with schema.org or LRMI data in them. If anyone is really interested in the source code I could put it on github.

Licence information in schema.org and LRMI⤴

from @ Sharing and learning

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When the Learning Resource Metadata Initiative (LRMI) technical working group started its work it focused on identifying the properties and relationships that were important for educational resources but could not be adequately expressed using schema.org as it then stood. One of those important pieces of information was the licence under which a resource was released, and so the LRMI spec from the start had the property useRightsUrl  “The URL where the owner specifies permissions for using the resource.” When schema.org adopted most of the LRMI properties, useRightsUrl was an exception, it was not adopted pending further consideration–not surprising really given the wide-ranging applicability of licence information beyond learning resources.

Back in June the good news came that with version 1.6 of schema.org included a license property for Creative Works that does all that LRMI wanted, and more.

What does this mean for LRMI adopters?

Some adopters of LRMI have already started using useRightsUrl.  Such implementations are valid LRMI but not valid schema.org, which means that they will only be understood by applications that have been written specifically to understand LRMI and not by the general purpose web-scale search applications. This is sub-optimal.

In passing, let me mention another complication. With schema.org you have a choice of syntax: microdata and RDFa 1.1 lite. With RDFa there was already a mechanism for identifying a link to a licence, that is rel=”license”.  Just to complicate a little more, RDFa allows name spacing, and the term license appears in at least three widely used namespaces: HTML5, Dublin Core Terms, and the Creative Commons Rights Expression Language–hopefully this will never matter to you.  To exemplify one of these options I’ll use the HTML that you get when you use the Creative Commons License Chooser (but let’s be absolutely clear, what I am writing about applies to any type of license whether the terms be open or commercial):

<a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/">

The good news is that all these options play nicely together, you can have the best of all worlds.

If you are already using itemprop=”useRightsUrl” to identify the link to a licence using LRMI in microdata, you can also use the license property and rel=”license”. The following  LRMI microdata with a bit RDFa thrown in works:

<html>
  <body itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/CreativeWork">
    <a itemprop="license useRightsUrl" rel="license"
        href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/">
        Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) licence
    </a>
  </body>
</html>

If you are using LRMI / schema.org in RDFa, then the following is valid

<html>
  <body vocab="http://schema.org/" typeof="CreativeWork">
    <a rel="license useRightsUrl"
       href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/">
       Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) licence
    </a>
  </body>
</html>

License does what LRMI asked for and more

In my opinion the schema.org license property is superior to the LRMI useRightsUrl for a few reasons. It does everything that LRMI wanted by way of identifying the URL of the licence under which the creative work is released, but also:

  • It belongs to a more widely recognised namespace, especially important if you are wanting to generate RDF data
  • I prefer the semantics of the name and definition: a license can include  restrictions of use as well as grant rights and permissions.
  • the range, i.e. the type of value that can be provided, includes Creative Works as well as Urls

That last points allows one to encode the name, url, description, date, accountable person and a whole host of other information about the licence (albeit at the cost of the not being able to do so alongside LRMI’s useRightsUrl quite so simply)

Summary

The inclusion in schema.org of the license property is good news for aims for LRMI. If you use LRMI and care about licensing you should tag the information you provide about the license with it. If you already use LRMI’s useRightsUrl or RDFa’s rel=”license” there is no need to stop doing so.

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