Tag Archives: research

Closing the mindset gap!⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

HOW DO WE INCREASE THE ATTAINMENT AND CONFIDENCE OF OUR LEARNERS ACROSS SCOTLAND? While there is no overall magic bullet, I believe that by creating a growth mindset culture within our schools; we can do much to improve children’s attainment and mental health. Let’s focus on the issue of closing the attainment gap. The link […]

What keeps you sharp? Over 40 this is for you⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

what-keeps-you-sharp

What Keeps You Sharp? survey launched

People often think of changes in their thinking skills with age in terms of decline. While some people do experience these changes, others do not.

What Keeps You Sharp? is a nationwide survey being led by researchers at Heriot-Watt University about your beliefs and attitudes to how thinking skills might change with age. They  also want to know if you think there are things we can do to maintain or improve thinking skills as we grow older.

If you’re aged 40 or over and living in the UK you can complete the survey online: http://tinyurl.com/keepingsharp.

 Help  spread the word

They  want to reach as broad an audience as possible, so share within your own networks – email lists, Facebook and other social media.

Anyone on social media can share the links  from @TheAgeingLab and the hashtag #WhatKeepsYouSharp?

Please share the survey among your friends and family and any groups you might be associated with.

Why is creativity important to employers? – new Creativity JPEGs available for use in presentations, reports, posters and online.⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The following JPEGs and PNGs (with a transparent background) are drawn from the Why is  creativity important to employers? infographic available on the National Improvement Hub.

Please use and share the images as widely as possible with educators, learners and partners in presentations, reports, posters and online.

You can also build your own infographics from scratch using the Everything Is Creative online tool and make your own use of the artwork you see here.

Why is creativity important to employers? Images for sharing and use creativity-skills-transcend-boundaries creative-work-can-be-hugely-rewarding inmvestors-in-people skills-of-the-future-report problem-solving-top-skill creative-digital-skills go-on-uk-research adobe-research untitled high-skilled-minority future-proof creative-industries employers-value-what-creativity-enables emplyers-value-close-up develop-your-transferable-creativity-skills-through

If you do one thing this term; collaborate⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

JanieBy Janie McManus, Assistant Director in charge of the Scottish Attainment Challenge

Welcome back after the holidays! It’s always an exciting time of year, and one when we’re looking ahead to the difference we will make to the lives of children across Scotland. When I was in the classroom I always remember the first day with a new class of children and both the excitement and anxiety about getting to know them quickly and thinking about the difference that I could make to their learning over the coming year.  One of the strengths of the school was working alongside my colleagues to share ideas, resources and talk about ways I could make my teaching and learning better.  Learning from each other about effective practice to raise attainment and close the poverty related attainment gap is a key feature of the Scottish Attainment Challenge.

On the Scottish Attainment Challenge, we’re heading into our second year. This time last year we had just appointed our first Attainment Advisors. As they have become established, they are working collaboratively across groupings of local authorities as well as working with individual schools and local authorities.

With a well-established full team, we are learning about what is working. That includes the impact on the vocabulary gap in Dundee of speech and language therapists working alongside teachers, and the value of CLPL on literacy for practitioners in Inverclyde.

Both are featured in the August edition of GTCS’s Teaching Scotland magazine, as the publication follows the progress of the Attainment Advisors in these two authorities.

In both examples, collaboration has been key, and one factor that keeps being highlighted by the Attainment Advisors is the value of sharing practice with colleagues, whether informally or formally through professional learning networks. I have been impressed by the approaches being used to develop professional learning and enquiry and the use of collaborative action research.

The anecdotal experience is backed up by research. A recently published paper by Professor Chris Chapman, Senior Academic Advisor to the Scottish Attainment Challenge, has demonstrated that collaborative working has a positive impact on personnel, facilitating improvements in many aspects of practice, which in turn has a positive impact on learner attainment.

If you are looking for ideas, both publications are a good place to start; or you could simply catch up with colleagues in and beyond your classroom and school and start the invaluable process of sharing your questions and experiences; and collaborating.

Key links

CBI’s latest survey reveals an increasing demand for a skilled workforce⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

CBI2016The latest CBI survey on education and skills (July 2016) revealed that businesses are predicting a rise in the demand for skilled workers in a rapidly changing labour market, with growing concerns of a skills shortage in the UK. In response employers are showing an increasing commitment to supporting the improvement of training and education with 4 out of 5 business now involved in school/college partnerships. Some of the key findings also highlight the importance of improving career education and work-based learning experiences for young people, then main propose and intention of the new Career Education and Work Placements Standards now available for all practitioners in Scotland.

For more information access the CBI/Pearson Education and Skills Survey 2016 here

‘Closing the gap’ between education and employment, by Anthony Mann⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Edu and Skills blogThis latest blog from Anthony Mann focuses on the European dimension of the link between education and employability.  It identifies employer engagement in education as a key issues in tackling the skills gap.

Government priority objectives across European countries include:

  • Tackling skills shortage/skills mismatch
  • Improving youth skills relevant to dynamic labour market demand
  • Harnessing community resources to improve attainment
  • Putting coherent pathways in place for young people moving through educational and training provision
  • Addressing inequalities in outcomes, promoting social mobility and challenging gender stereotyping.

For more information on this include OECD reports see visit the Education & Skills Today blog.

Also relevant in this context is Mann’s report key_issues_in_employer_engagement_in_education_anthony_mann‘ which specifically relates to the Scottish context. .

Learning Families – Intergenerational Approaches to Literacy Teaching and Learning⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

“All of the programmes featured in this publication by the UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning  share valuable experiences and lessons. They reflect a view of effective learning families whereby each child is a member of a family, and within a learning family every member is a lifelong learner. Among disadvantaged families and communities in particular, a family literacy and learning approach is more likely to break the intergenerational cycle of low education and literacy skills..” (Elfert and Hanermann 2014)

http://uil.unesco.org/fileadmin/keydocuments/Literacy/en/learning-families.pdf

Family Learning Research⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

This report presents findings from a study of family literacy programmes in England carried out by the National Research and Development Centre for Adult Literacy and Numeracy (NRDC) at UCL Institute of Education (IOE) between July 2013 and May 2015. This mixed-methods study was funded by the Nuffield Foundation and explored: 1) the impact of school-based family literacy programmes on young children’s progress in reading and writing; and 2) how parents translate and implement what they learn in these classes into the home literacy environment. This study provides evidence that after attending family literacy sessions children improve their literacy skills and there are positive changes in the home literacy environment.

http://www.nrdc.org.uk/?p=838

 

EU Report: Youth work’s contribution to aid transition from education into employment⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

EU youth work and employabilityThe contribution of youth work to address the challenges young people are facing, in particular the transition from education to employment.

The Report presents results from the work of the expert group set up under the European Union Work Plan for Youth for 2014-2015.

The findings detail the role of youth work and its specific contribution to addressing the challenges young people face, in particular the transition from education to employment. The report seeks to make employers, Public Employment Services and policy-makers aware of the crucial role youth work can play – either as a lead agency or in partnership with others – in supporting the employment and employability of young people. In this context, youth work is defined as ‘actions directed towards young people regarding activities where they take part voluntarily, designed for supporting their personal and social development through non-formal and informal learning’.

BBC News: Career talks ‘boost future earnings’ – research⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

PWP_2629Career education given to pupils in secondary school can be linked to higher earnings in adult life,  according to the latest research highlighted in a BBC News report.

A study published in the Journal of Education and Work suggests that better-informed teenagers are likely to make more advantageous career choices.

It measures the earnings benefit as an extra £2,000 per year for every six careers sessions when aged 14 to 15.

Researchers used the British Cohort Study tracking 17,000 people.

The research, commissioned by the Education and Employers charity, found that once other factors were taken into account, such as exam results and economic background, there were higher earnings for those who had received sustained careers advice in school.

The study, by Christian Percy and Elnaz Kashefpakdela from the University of Bath, used data from the British Cohort Study which has been tracking the health, wealth and education of people since 1970.

It concluded that there was a long-lasting employment impact from careers talks and lessons.

Where there were “higher levels of employer contacts, in the form of careers talks with outside speakers”, researchers found that this was linked to higher returns in the labour market.

They concluded that getting careers information and meeting employers in school had a “meaningful and statistically significant impact on later earnings”.

Anthony Mann, director of policy and research for Education and Employers, said: “Other well-known studies have highlighted the benefits of employer engagement, but never before have we had such a robust analysis drawing on such rich data.”

Nick Soar, head teacher at Bishop Challoner Catholic Federation in east London, backed the benefits of outside speakers from industry.

“The pupils love it. They ask endless questions and you can see it really brings home to them what they need to do to succeed in the workplace,” he said.

CBI president Paul Drechsler said: “This report makes clear the importance and impact of great careers insights and advice from people in the business world.”

Andreas Schleicher, the OECD’s education director, said the study provided evidence for how “career education translates into measurable earnings advantages”.

Education and Childcare Minister Sam Gyimah said the research “provides further evidence of the positive impact an employer can have on a young person’s future career”.