Tag Archives: research

Explorathon is coming!⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Explorathon is a set of interactive ‘Meet the Researcher’ events happening all over Scotland on Friday 28th and Saturday 29th September. It’s part of a Europe-wide programme called European Researchers’ Night, there’s a particular emphasis on European funded research but any researchers can take part.
Check out the link below to see what is happening near you!
http://www.explorathon.co.uk/

Creating Online Questionnaires⤴

from @ EdCompBlog

There are some great tools that help you create and process questionnaires. SurveyMonkey is probably the most comprehensive tool I have used but some of the more useful features (particularly, export to Excel) are not available for free. Also, it is probably over-powered for the majority of tasks I want complete. For example, there are a number of occasions where students want to collect data (e.g. 6th Year projects) and for them, I generally recommend Google Forms or Microsoft Forms.

There is not a lot to choose between Google and Microsoft for small-scale, pupil created questionnaires. Both provide similar tools, similar summaries of responses and similar levels of technical ability (minimal!) are required to create and process questionnaires. But creating an effective and useful questionnaire requires more than technical skills.

Often I will recommend pupils include questions that invite a response on a rating scale ranging from "Strongly agree" to Strongly disagree" (or similar). Recently, I was sent a form for comment where a series of rating questions were asked with a multiple choice format rather than a grid (see example below).

Multiple choice format:
  1. Chips are better than mashed potatoes.
    A) Strongly agree.
    B) Agree.
    C) Disagree.
    D) Strongly disagree.
  2. Muppets are better than puppies.
    A) Strongly agree.
    B) Agree.
    C) Disagree.
    D) Strongly disagree.
  3. Marmite is the best thing since sliced bread.
    A) Strongly agree.
    B) Agree.
    C) Disagree.
    D) Strongly disagree.
Grid format:

Strongly agree Agree Disagree Strongly disagree
1. Chips are better than mashed potatoes.
O
O
O
O
2. Muppets are better than puppies.
O
O
O
O
3. Marmite is the best thing since sliced bread.
O
O
O
O

I asked why a grid had not been used and the student expressed surprised that it was an option. The sample questionnaire had been created in Microsoft Forms, so I made this video to show it could be done. I thought others might find it useful.

Research SPLOTs?⤴

from

https://twitter.com/projectsoothe/status/948644779352576000 On reading the above, it occurs to me that perhaps we should be rolling SPLOTs into our toolsets for research too. I can see how well the image, video and writing ones could fit with a number of citizen science / crowd sourced research … Continue reading Research SPLOTs?

Impetus – Ready for Work report: The capabilities young people need to find and keep work!⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

In case you haven seen this report so far:

This Ready for Work (2014) report, produced by Impetus-PEF in partnership with the Young Foundation and the Social Research Unit at Dartington (SRU), seeks to provide practical answers to the question: how can we help young people be ready for work? The study aims to support those who fund, invest in or provide services to improve the employability of young people – including our main concern, young people from disadvantaged background.  

It identifies six essential capabilities that young people are expected to demonstrate in order to get and keep a job:

Self-awareness, Receptiveness, Drive, being Self-assured, Resilience and being Informed.

The report also reflected on a number of programmes or interventions with a proven record of success, providing valuable thoughts and information as people develop and implement strategies within their respective contexts.

You can access the report here:  2014_09-Ready-for-Work

The Story of Me – increasing vocabulary recognition.⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

I am a primary school class teacher, based in Scotland. I teach Primary 2 (age 6 -7 years). I designed the Story of Me project to promote recall of vocabulary. It was inspired by an article I read recently by Turk et Al (2015) which found that children were more likely to recall target vocabulary if it […]

Erasmus+ Act for Careers Conference, 15th June 2017⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

We would like to invite you to attend the Glasgow City Council Education Services Erasmus+ Act for Careers Conference on Thursday June 15th  2017, 09.30 – 16.00 at, The Prince’s Trust Wolfson Centre, Cumbrae House, 15 Carlton Ct, Glasgow G5 9JP.

Glasgow City Council and the City of Nuremberg have been collaborating since 2014 under the Erasmus+ European education programme to improving support for young people’s employability skills in their transition from school to work.  The project entitled ‘Act for Careers’ has involved, schools, colleges, employment support teams and businesses to examine and learn from best practice in this field to inform and enhance local/national policy and practice at key transition points in young people’s development of their employability skills.  On March 9th 2017, City of Nuremberg delivered a conference on their findings and collaboration with the City of Glasgow. 

The conference will offer a range of workshops and plenary sessions on learning about the German education system, the benefits of:  international engagement; funded European job shadowing opportunities; enhanced practice on employability skills from school to work and on supporting young people from a refugee background into employment.  Speakers will include the Depute Mayor of Nuremberg, Executive Director of Education Glasgow City Council and project participants from both Glasgow and Nuremberg, including young people from Lochend Community High School.

Registration: Please complete the Erasmus+ ACT Registration Form and return it to by Friday 12th May to: UnitHeadEAL@gdss.glasgow.sch.uk  

 

Closing the mindset gap!⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

HOW DO WE INCREASE THE ATTAINMENT AND CONFIDENCE OF OUR LEARNERS ACROSS SCOTLAND? While there is no overall magic bullet, I believe that by creating a growth mindset culture within our schools; we can do much to improve children’s attainment and mental health. Let’s focus on the issue of closing the attainment gap. The link […]

What keeps you sharp? Over 40 this is for you⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

what-keeps-you-sharp

What Keeps You Sharp? survey launched

People often think of changes in their thinking skills with age in terms of decline. While some people do experience these changes, others do not.

What Keeps You Sharp? is a nationwide survey being led by researchers at Heriot-Watt University about your beliefs and attitudes to how thinking skills might change with age. They  also want to know if you think there are things we can do to maintain or improve thinking skills as we grow older.

If you’re aged 40 or over and living in the UK you can complete the survey online: http://tinyurl.com/keepingsharp.

 Help  spread the word

They  want to reach as broad an audience as possible, so share within your own networks – email lists, Facebook and other social media.

Anyone on social media can share the links  from @TheAgeingLab and the hashtag #WhatKeepsYouSharp?

Please share the survey among your friends and family and any groups you might be associated with.

Why is creativity important to employers? – new Creativity JPEGs available for use in presentations, reports, posters and online.⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The following JPEGs and PNGs (with a transparent background) are drawn from the Why is  creativity important to employers? infographic available on the National Improvement Hub.

Please use and share the images as widely as possible with educators, learners and partners in presentations, reports, posters and online.

You can also build your own infographics from scratch using the Everything Is Creative online tool and make your own use of the artwork you see here.

Why is creativity important to employers? Images for sharing and use creativity-skills-transcend-boundaries creative-work-can-be-hugely-rewarding inmvestors-in-people skills-of-the-future-report problem-solving-top-skill creative-digital-skills go-on-uk-research adobe-research untitled high-skilled-minority future-proof creative-industries employers-value-what-creativity-enables emplyers-value-close-up develop-your-transferable-creativity-skills-through

If you do one thing this term; collaborate⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

JanieBy Janie McManus, Assistant Director in charge of the Scottish Attainment Challenge

Welcome back after the holidays! It’s always an exciting time of year, and one when we’re looking ahead to the difference we will make to the lives of children across Scotland. When I was in the classroom I always remember the first day with a new class of children and both the excitement and anxiety about getting to know them quickly and thinking about the difference that I could make to their learning over the coming year.  One of the strengths of the school was working alongside my colleagues to share ideas, resources and talk about ways I could make my teaching and learning better.  Learning from each other about effective practice to raise attainment and close the poverty related attainment gap is a key feature of the Scottish Attainment Challenge.

On the Scottish Attainment Challenge, we’re heading into our second year. This time last year we had just appointed our first Attainment Advisors. As they have become established, they are working collaboratively across groupings of local authorities as well as working with individual schools and local authorities.

With a well-established full team, we are learning about what is working. That includes the impact on the vocabulary gap in Dundee of speech and language therapists working alongside teachers, and the value of CLPL on literacy for practitioners in Inverclyde.

Both are featured in the August edition of GTCS’s Teaching Scotland magazine, as the publication follows the progress of the Attainment Advisors in these two authorities.

In both examples, collaboration has been key, and one factor that keeps being highlighted by the Attainment Advisors is the value of sharing practice with colleagues, whether informally or formally through professional learning networks. I have been impressed by the approaches being used to develop professional learning and enquiry and the use of collaborative action research.

The anecdotal experience is backed up by research. A recently published paper by Professor Chris Chapman, Senior Academic Advisor to the Scottish Attainment Challenge, has demonstrated that collaborative working has a positive impact on personnel, facilitating improvements in many aspects of practice, which in turn has a positive impact on learner attainment.

If you are looking for ideas, both publications are a good place to start; or you could simply catch up with colleagues in and beyond your classroom and school and start the invaluable process of sharing your questions and experiences; and collaborating.

Key links