Tag Archives: Raspberry Pi / Intel Galileo / BBC MicroBit

New ‘Hello World’ Magazine & tribute to Seymour Papert [#BETT2017 @BETT_show @Raspberry_Pi]⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

 

Hello World

I picked up a copy of the new ‘Hello World’ Magazine at BETT 2017.

The magazine is a collaboration between  The Raspberry Pi Foundation, Computing At School (CAS), The BCS Academy of Computing and British Telecom (BT).

Hello World is a magazine about computing and digital making written by educators, for educators. With three issues each year, it contains 100 pages filled with news, features, teaching resources, reviews, research and much more.

It is designed to be cross-curricular and useful to all kinds of educators, from classroom teachers to librarians.

Now here is the best bit. It is also my favorite price... FREE, forever, for everyone online as a downloadable pdf.  

Italy-makerspaces-41b8b664bcd33056714524a8c212a7d0018fb4d7fc4c1e9818faead4e593b96e

This first issue is dedicated to Seymour Papert, in many ways the godfather of computing education (and lots of other things!). Papert was the creator of the Logo programming language and the author of some of the most important research on the role of computers in education. Inside the first edition you will find articles exploring Papert’s influence on how we think about learning, on the rise of the maker movement, and on the software that is used to teach computing today from Scratch to Greenfoot.

You can subscribe to Hello World here and due to sponsorship from BT you can also get a nice glossy version of the first three editions straight to your door!

On the subject of Seymour Papert (February 29, 1928 – July 31, 2016). Here is a nice little video about this great man's work from the Lego Foundation.

 

New ‘Hello World’ Magazine & tribute to Seymour Papert [#BETT2017 @BETT_show @Raspberry_Pi]⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

 

Hello World

I picked up a copy of the new ‘Hello World’ Magazine at BETT 2017.

The magazine is a collaboration between  The Raspberry Pi Foundation, Computing At School (CAS), The BCS Academy of Computing and British Telecom (BT).

Hello World is a magazine about computing and digital making written by educators, for educators. With three issues each year, it contains 100 pages filled with news, features, teaching resources, reviews, research and much more.

It is designed to be cross-curricular and useful to all kinds of educators, from classroom teachers to librarians.

Now here is the best bit. It is also my favorite price... FREE, forever, for everyone online as a downloadable pdf.  

Italy-makerspaces-41b8b664bcd33056714524a8c212a7d0018fb4d7fc4c1e9818faead4e593b96e

This first issue is dedicated to Seymour Papert, in many ways the godfather of computing education (and lots of other things!). Papert was the creator of the Logo programming language and the author of some of the most important research on the role of computers in education. Inside the first edition you will find articles exploring Papert’s influence on how we think about learning, on the rise of the maker movement, and on the software that is used to teach computing today from Scratch to Greenfoot.

You can subscribe to Hello World here and due to sponsorship from BT you can also get a nice glossy version of the first three editions straight to your door!

On the subject of Seymour Papert (February 29, 1928 – July 31, 2016). Here is a nice little video about this great man's work from the Lego Foundation.

 

Raspberry Pi Projects on Pinterest [@raspberry_pi]⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

Porta-Pi-Raspberry-Pi-Mini-Arcade-Cabinet

I'm a big fan of the Raspberry Pi and we have invested in a class set (with potable monitors) at Kingussie. We are using the Raspberry Pi's for various computing / maker projects at the moment. I am also enthusiastic about other similar devices such at the Intel Galileo and the new BBC MicroBit.

"The Raspberry Pi is a low cost, credit-card sized computer that plugs into a computer monitor or TV, and uses a standard keyboard and mouse. It is a capable little device that enables people of all ages to explore computing, and to learn how to program in languages like Scratch and Python. It’s capable of doing everything you’d expect a desktop computer to do, from browsing the internet and playing high-definition video, to making spreadsheets, word-processing, and playing games."

"What’s more, the Raspberry Pi  has the ability to interact with the outside world, and has been  used in a wide array of digital maker projects, from music machines and parent detectors to weather stations and tweeting birdhouses with infra-red cameras. We want to see the Raspberry Pi being used by kids all over the world to learn to program and understand how computers work."

You can make lots of cool stuff with a Raspberry Pi and I recently discovered that the Raspberry Pi Foundation has a Pinterest Board where that showcase some of the coolest Pi Projects. My favourite is the board on Games and Gaming but I also like the one on Wearables, Textiles and Fibres.