Tag Archives: Pupils

Haysholm ASN School use Glow Blogs to develop skills & confidence⤴

from @ Glow Gallery

Haysholm School is one of four ASN schools in North Ayrshire. It is a non-denominational school for pupils aged 5 – 18 with severe and complex additional support needs. Their catchment area extends to Largs and the Garnock Valley. The current role is 24, 15 primary aged pupils and 9 secondary aged pupils, all of whom have an Individualised Educational Programme (IEP).

The school vision is to provide learners with a happy and high quality learning and teaching environment to develop their strengths, skills and talents.  Staff  work in partnership with parents and partners to deliver a curriculum that enables learners to reach their full potential and to be as functionally independent as possible. It is their aim to ensure that all pupils are fully included, accepted and, where possible,  can contribute to the community in which they live and learn.

Yvonne Gribben, the Head Teacher, was one of the first staff members in North Ayrshire to engage with Glow blogs and in session 2013 -14 established the Haysholm School website using a public Glow blog.

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Yvonne wanted a website to engage with parents and share the pupils’ work in a way that would suit the busy lives of all those concerned with the school. Being a public blog, parents and carers can access it on the Internet at a time that suits them.

The blog became very popular and Yvonne decided that the next step was creating blogs for the classes to allow pupils to share their learning directly with their parents and carers.

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Classroom assistants maintain these blogs and they are regularly updated with photos and text about pupils’ achievements.

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Yvonne: “Haysholm School have been trialling Glow blogs as a way of recording learners’ journeys to map progression across the 4 contexts for learning. A sample of pupils were selected (one from each class) to trial this and their parents/carers invited to be trained in uploading evidence of wider achievements from home.  Although in the very early stages, we can see that this is the way forward for documenting evidence of progression for our learners. As most of our learners are visual learners this is an excellent way of engaging them in looking at and raising their awareness of what they are learning and what their strengths are.  It is a good focus for literacy and development of communication skills as well as working on the use of digital technology.”

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Rosslyn Lee, the Glow Development Officer, worked one morning with the classroom assistants who work with four of the pupils. They set up and customised the blogs to reflect the personalities of the pupils and learned how to make posts and upload photos of the pupils.

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A few months later, the parents of each child were invited in to a workshop with Rosslyn where the rationale behind the blogs was explained to them. They also logged into their child’s blog and learned how to make posts and upload photographs.  This means that each of these four children can now have their achievements within and outwith school, recorded electronically.

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The parents were very enthusiastic about the blogs and generated a lot of discussion about what could be uploaded into them. Rosslyn showed them how to create a photo gallery and talked about the possibility of linking to videos in the school’s Microsoft Video Channel.

This was originally a pilot with only four pupils, however the school have recently decided to proceed with individual blogs for all their learners next year as a way of recording evidence of successes and achievement.

 

The Education debate – a builder’s take⤴

from @ blethers

I was chatting to our builder yesterday about schools. It seemed to me that this successful tradesman, running the building firm that he inherited from his father, had the secret of attainment in school well sussed. He attended the same school as my children, at the same time, and he told us a story.

He was in a science class - about S3/4 level - who were being taught by a supply teacher. She was pleasant, but deadly boring. He and his pals began to amuse themselves; the lesson was doomed. So, it seemed, was the supply teacher - for all knew well that she'd never regain the control necessary for learning to take place. Ah well.

A week later his father called him over for a quiet word. The essence of it was this: You were in a class being taught by Mrs. Bloggs? And you misbehaved and upset her? Right. Mrs Bloggs is a good customer of ours - in fact, I'm working on her house right now. If I ever hear that you've stepped out of line in her class again, I'll f******g well do you. Right?

Crude but effective. But it contains the seeds of success in many a small town school, where no-one is unknown and where the strangest connections emerge with remarkable rapidity. Pupils, teachers, Head Teacher and parents are linked in a symbiotic relationship in which all have to play their part or be found out. It makes for a relatively enjoyable existence for all - and that is where I taught for over 20 years without any of the negative fall-out which newcomers to a small town tend to fear.

But what else can we learn from this story? Nothing new, actually. The seeds of underachievement are to be found on both sides of the garden: boring teachers who wouldn't inspire the most docile of students, and uninterested or incapable parents. And then there's the growing sub-group of hostile and resentful parents as well, the ones who encourage their children not to let the teacher "get away" with any attempt to prevent their precious weans from walking all over everyone. Any one of these on its own will spoil the business of learning; more than one and we might as well all go home.

So what do you do to ensure that none of these weeds enter the Eden of education? No amount of pupil testing is going to help Mr Tedious to become a glowing enthusiast; no closing of the attainment gap is going to happen without somehow involving the parents in the enterprise. And no political manifesto is going to make a scrap of difference unless a whole generation of teachers and parents are somehow unified in one glowing, aspirational whole where the excitement of maths and the joy of literature and the joy of finding out become more important than a tidy record of work or where the next meal is coming from, or the next boyfriend, or the next fix.

I wouldn't have Nicola Sturgeon's job for anything. But those who advise her, who tell her that National Testing is the way to ensure that every child can have the same chances that she did, these advisors should perhaps begin by pointing at the Sturgeon family. They were the bedrock of the First Minister's success.

And she maybe managed to avoid the boring teachers ...

The Education debate – a builder’s take⤴

from @ blethers

I was chatting to our builder yesterday about schools. It seemed to me that this successful tradesman, running the building firm that he inherited from his father, had the secret of attainment in school well sussed. He attended the same school as my children, at the same time, and he told us a story.

He was in a science class - about S3/4 level - who were being taught by a supply teacher. She was pleasant, but deadly boring. He and his pals began to amuse themselves; the lesson was doomed. So, it seemed, was the supply teacher - for all knew well that she'd never regain the control necessary for learning to take place. Ah well.

A week later his father called him over for a quiet word. The essence of it was this: You were in a class being taught by Mrs. Bloggs? And you misbehaved and upset her? Right. Mrs Bloggs is a good customer of ours - in fact, I'm working on her house right now. If I ever hear that you've stepped out of line in her class again, I'll f******g well do you. Right?

Crude but effective. But it contains the seeds of success in many a small town school, where no-one is unknown and where the strangest connections emerge with remarkable rapidity. Pupils, teachers, Head Teacher and parents are linked in a symbiotic relationship in which all have to play their part or be found out. It makes for a relatively enjoyable existence for all - and that is where I taught for over 20 years without any of the negative fall-out which newcomers to a small town tend to fear.

But what else can we learn from this story? Nothing new, actually. The seeds of underachievement are to be found on both sides of the garden: boring teachers who wouldn't inspire the most docile of students, and uninterested or incapable parents. And then there's the growing sub-group of hostile and resentful parents as well, the ones who encourage their children not to let the teacher "get away" with any attempt to prevent their precious weans from walking all over everyone. Any one of these on its own will spoil the business of learning; more than one and we might as well all go home.

So what do you do to ensure that none of these weeds enter the Eden of education? No amount of pupil testing is going to help Mr Tedious to become a glowing enthusiast; no closing of the attainment gap is going to happen without somehow involving the parents in the enterprise. And no political manifesto is going to make a scrap of difference unless a whole generation of teachers and parents are somehow unified in one glowing, aspirational whole where the excitement of maths and the joy of literature and the joy of finding out become more important than a tidy record of work or where the next meal is coming from, or the next boyfriend, or the next fix.

I wouldn't have Nicola Sturgeon's job for anything. But those who advise her, who tell her that National Testing is the way to ensure that every child can have the same chances that she did, these advisors should perhaps begin by pointing at the Sturgeon family. They were the bedrock of the First Minister's success.

And she maybe managed to avoid the boring teachers ...

The Education debate – a builder’s take⤴

from @ blethers

I was chatting to our builder yesterday about schools. It seemed to me that this successful tradesman, running the building firm that he inherited from his father, had the secret of attainment in school well sussed. He attended the same school as my children, at the same time, and he told us a story.

He was in a science class - about S3/4 level - who were being taught by a supply teacher. She was pleasant, but deadly boring. He and his pals began to amuse themselves; the lesson was doomed. So, it seemed, was the supply teacher - for all knew well that she'd never regain the control necessary for learning to take place. Ah well.

A week later his father called him over for a quiet word. The essence of it was this: You were in a class being taught by Mrs. Bloggs? And you misbehaved and upset her? Right. Mrs Bloggs is a good customer of ours - in fact, I'm working on her house right now. If I ever hear that you've stepped out of line in her class again, I'll f******g well do you. Right?

Crude but effective. But it contains the seeds of success in many a small town school, where no-one is unknown and where the strangest connections emerge with remarkable rapidity. Pupils, teachers, Head Teacher and parents are linked in a symbiotic relationship in which all have to play their part or be found out. It makes for a relatively enjoyable existence for all - and that is where I taught for over 20 years without any of the negative fall-out which newcomers to a small town tend to fear.

But what else can we learn from this story? Nothing new, actually. The seeds of underachievement are to be found on both sides of the garden: boring teachers who wouldn't inspire the most docile of students, and uninterested or incapable parents. And then there's the growing sub-group of hostile and resentful parents as well, the ones who encourage their children not to let the teacher "get away" with any attempt to prevent their precious weans from walking all over everyone. Any one of these on its own will spoil the business of learning; more than one and we might as well all go home.

So what do you do to ensure that none of these weeds enter the Eden of education? No amount of pupil testing is going to help Mr Tedious to become a glowing enthusiast; no closing of the attainment gap is going to happen without somehow involving the parents in the enterprise. And no political manifesto is going to make a scrap of difference unless a whole generation of teachers and parents are somehow unified in one glowing, aspirational whole where the excitement of maths and the joy of literature and the joy of finding out become more important than a tidy record of work or where the next meal is coming from, or the next boyfriend, or the next fix.

I wouldn't have Nicola Sturgeon's job for anything. But those who advise her, who tell her that National Testing is the way to ensure that every child can have the same chances that she did, these advisors should perhaps begin by pointing at the Sturgeon family. They were the bedrock of the First Minister's success.

And she maybe managed to avoid the boring teachers ...

Domains for pupils an idea for now?⤴

from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

Pano from  Beinn Bhreac

Here are a great series of articles that I came across this morning. I’d recommend everyone interested in the Internet and education to read them.

For someone who reads a lot online I do not dip into TES often. So I was excited to find
Jim Knight: ‘Let’s give all students their own domain name – and watch the digital learning that follows’ today.

Ironically I got it via Jim Groom’s post:
Domains and the Cost of Innovation. I do read Jim’s blog religiously.

Jim Knight’s article is based on another wonderful post by Audrey Watters> Audrey writes about the work of Jim Groom and others at the University of Mary Washington: The Web We Need to Give Students.

I’ve been muttering and mumbling about this idea for a good while now, based on reading about the UMW project and taking part in DS106. I really hope that the TES article gives the idea some legs and it can get some traction in the UK and more importantly, to me, in Scotland.

Before I started working on the Glow team, I included it in a post, Glow should be at the trailing edge?. I don’t think the idea has ever been given serious consideration at the right level. It certainly goes is a slightly different direction than Glow is going but it is still worth considering.

Cairn Primary School Primary 2/3 Glow Pages⤴

from @ Glow Gallery

Diane Owens from Cairn Primary School in Maybole explains how she began using Glow with her Primary 2/3 class.

Diane had used the previous version of Glow and was given some basic training on the new Office 365 version of Glow by another member of staff in her school.

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After this Diane began setting up a class site for her P2/3 class.  Diane found she needed a bit of help to begin with, but once she got started it was quite straightforward.

Diane decided to set up a site where her class could access messages from the teacher at home and also find their homework.  As the class were P2/3 and operating at First Level, Diane found that the photographs feature of Glow was very useful.

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Diane posted photographs which related to the pupils’ homework to help them complete it at home.

As well as this Diane found that the pupils really enjoyed seeing photographs which related to work in the classroom and particularly enjoyed being able to share this with their parents and other family members at home.

Diane also created a list of useful weblinks for the pupils, which included sites such as:

Homework Shop

Think U Know

Woodlands Maths and Literacy

National Geographic kids’ site

Diane found that one of the most popular aspects for the pupils was the ease of communication with the teacher when the pupils were at home or out of school.  They regularly commented that this was their favourite thing about using Glow.

 

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Diane reports that she was pleasantly surprised and pleased by how confident the young learners in her class were in using Glow.  Diane has 2 Pcs and a laptop in her classroom and the class have 2 sessions in the school’s ICT suite per week, one for curricular work and one for ICT skills.

 

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Cairn Primary School Glow School Site⤴

from @ Glow Gallery

Amanda Pickard at Cairn Primary, Maybole shows how she encouraged staff to use Glow to help make learning fun.

 

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Amanda used the previous version of Glow for learning and teaching and was keen for all staff to use the new version. As a result she embarked on a training programme for all staff in the school. After this was completed, Amanda felt the ideal way to get started was to create a school site on Glow, with a school landing page and pages for each class and teacher.

Amanda created the Cairn Primary School’s Glow Landing page:

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She then encouraged each teacher to create their own class page with help if needed.

Amanda created her own page for her Primary 6 class:

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Every class page has a Newsfeed, Things to Do list, useful weblinks and photographs.

Amanda’s P6 class has additional pages created for topics studied by the class:

Scots

The Modern World

Safer Internet Day

All homework for P6 is uploaded on to the P6 Glow page.  Pupils can manage their homework for the week and have the choice to download it early depending on any commitments they may have during the week.  This has worked well for quite a number of pupils.

The weblinks section has proved useful as a resource to help pupils complete their homework with popular links including Education City, Sumdog, Cool Maths, Woodland Maths and Literacy websites. As well as this the teacher added topic specific websites such as Yad Vashem and Guardian of the Memory websites for Holocaust Memorial Day.

Another feature which proved useful for learning was the survey feature.

As well as setting up the survey on the class page, a graphical representation can be called up showing pupils the results of the survey:

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This is an ideal tool for helping pupils learn about information handling and they can create their own surveys and analyse the results.

The pupils are particularly keen on the Photographs section of the class page where all photographs of learning activities and other class activities are posted.  Amanda reports that pupils love being able to show their families what they have been up to in school and this has proved to be one of the most popular areas on the page.

As well as this, the Newsfeed has allowed an ongoing conversation about learning to take place amongst teacher and pupils and other pupils. The informality of this conversation can sometimes disguise the fact that there is meaningful help being provided amongst peers with homework and of course the conversation is monitored by the class teacher.

Amanda’s plans for next session include having staff proformas on the school landing page to make them available to all teachers.  For her class she is planning to begin using OneNote which will allow her and her pupils to edit documents simultaneously, for example working together on a Word document.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GPS Sensational Sevens⤴

from @ Glow Gallery

This is a wonderful class blog from Gourock. The pupils and their teacher blog about a wide range of activities, using images and video expertly.

Hello and welcome to Gourock Primary School’s P7 Class Blog Inverclyde. Check back regularly to see what we have been up to! This Blog is updated by P7 pupils and Mrs Hunter. Follow us on Twitter: @MrsAndreaHunter

 

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Gourock Primary Sensational Sevens

My Island⤴

from @ Glow Gallery

Screen Shot 2015-03-03 at 12.02.06

My Island.

An interesting looking blog from a Primary Learner, Emma describes here blog:

I live on the lovely island of Islay on the west coast of Scotland.  We have lots of lovely wildlife, beaches and people and places to visit.  I go to port Ellen Primary School and every year primary 5-7 carry out an Endeavour project.  This is an extended project that must be ambitious, challenging, have new learning and be shared with others.  Last year my Endeavour project was on cooking, and I made lots of different foods in the school kitchen.  This year I am going to be travelling around my island and finding out more about it.  I will write about my experiences in this blog with the help of my teachers and parents.  I want to learn all the different things there are to do on Islay that I enjoy.

Safer Internet Day 2015 Kinglassie Primary School⤴

from @ Glow Gallery

A little background to the story……

The Internet Safety – Learners site was developed to illustrate how technology could be used to support teaching and learning.

The purpose was to exemplify key features available through the technology and how this could be used to improve the learning experience.

Olivia Wexelstein (Teacher of P7) at Kinglassie Primary School in Fife kindly agreed to develop a series of lessons with a clear focus on Safer Internet Day. Both the Head Teacher and Olivia recognised that the technology could in fact be used to support a whole school Internet Safety project.

The project was carried out on February 9-10 2015 which would coincide with Safer Internet Day. Although the technology supported a whole school approach to Internet Safety it also opened up possible opportunities for other learners and educators across Scotland to take part and contribute to the project.

It was clear throughout the planning of the project that technology offered a wide range of ideas and possibilities to improve the learning experience. Each task was designed to incorporate various features of technology and this allowed learners an opportunity to engage with technology on a wider scale.

 

Was Glow services the only type of technologies used in the project?

No, although Glow offers a wide range of technological services other types of technologies were explored as the purpose of the project was to exemplify how technology could be used to support teaching and learning.

 

Which Glow services were used for the project?

Olivia created tasks which allowed learners the opportunity to use the following features within Glow:

Office 365

  • OneNote to share ideas
  • Newsfeed to communicate and share learning experiences with others
  • Discussion forum to discuss a Safer Internet Day video
  • A dedicated area which allowed learners to upload their work

Wikis

  • Another collaborative tool which supported learners in working together on a specific task

 

Did young people have an opportunity to use any other types of technology other than services offered through Glow?

Yes, Olivia used Padlet (https://padlet.com/) which is a virtual wall that allows people to express their ideas and thoughts. It really is like an online sheet of paper where content e.g. images, videos, documents and text etc can be added anywhere on the page from any device.

 

Can I have a look at the site to see what Kinglassie PS achieved?

Absolutely, the site is available at: http://tinyurl.com/lkhaz5b. The site was available and promoted using the national newsfeed on Glow as well as using other communication channels such as the Education Scotland Facebook and Twitter accounts.

Maisie