Tag Archives: Professional Learning

DYW Interesting Practice- Ellon Academy: ‘Work-related Learning’ offer enhance pupils’ employability skills⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

In response to the new Work Placements Standard, Ellon Academy has introduce their ‘Work-related Learning’ model  in collaboration with local business and employers offered as an option choice for all pupils in the senior phase.   Leaners are given the opportunity to   participate in  internship-style work placements one day a week from August to Easter and are able to select from a wide range of  sectors including journalism, education, hospitality, performing arts, event management child care.  Supplementary lessons in school allow participants to reflect on their   learning experience, enhance newly developed skills and at the same time gain a National Progression Award in Enterprise and Employability at level 4 or 5.

Access the summary information sheet to find out more about this innovative approach:

Interesting Practice in Skills DYW – Ellon Academy

Hear from some of the pupils about their ‘work-related learning’ experiences:

 

 

DYW Interesting Practice – Dalgety Bay Primary School: The Career Education Standard at the heart of school planning⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Laura Spence  , HT at Dalgety Bay Primary School has adopted a unique approach to ensure that career education is an integral part of the school improvement planning.  Embracing  the Career Education Standard 3-18  all staff have used Learning Resource 1:  Introduction to the Career Education Standard in order to embed the entitlements into the learning and teaching across the school.

This approach has become a cluster model and has been recognised by  and share across Fife Council .

The school’s vision of realising their ambitions to provide all children with opportunities to connect leanring with the world of work include the following actions :

  • Teachers will provide creative opportunities to develop the skills for life in meaningful and relevant contexts within their class.
  • All teacher will deliver 4D learning intentions, consistently linking each lesson to career education.
  • Our weekly assemblies will regularly include information on specific careers, making children aware of the range of employment opportunities on offer.
  • Children  from P5 onwards will have access to the ‘My World of Work’ website where they will have the opportunity to explore different career options focusing on skills and qualifications.
  • Classroom displays and planning will include links to Career Education throughout the school.
  • We will continue to engage with local business partners and beyond to develop contacts and create a database of professionals prepared to support the school in developing Career Education within school.
  • We will be planning and organising a Career Education Day that will take place on 22nd November 2016.

Find out more about Dalgety Bay Primary Schools approach by accessing the summary information and school DYW leaflet here:

Interesting Practice in Skills DYW – Dalgety Bay PS

Career Education Leaflet Dalgety Bay PS

 

DYW Interesting Practice – Larbert High School: Developing young peoples’ skills across all aspects of learning⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Developing learners’ skills is high on the agenda at Larbert High School.  The leadership team have adopted a systematic approach to enhancing young peoples’ skills for life and work and implemented a holistic ‘Skills Framework’ across all aspects of the curriculum.  The school uses the DYW context to offer learners a wide variety of experience and  pathways in order to ensure all young people are developing the necessary skills and aptitudes for a positive vision about the futures.  Collaboration with both the wider community and employers is elementary to the successful realisation of this goal.

The ‘Skills Framework at Larbert High School complements this agenda and ensures that all young peoples know, understand and are able to articulate  their skill sets and are able to relate these to their  career aspirations.     The following document outlines the Skills Framework:

Interesting Practice in Skills DYW – LHS Skills Framework

Hear from teachers and pupils about the structure of the Skills Framework and its impact:

SLF 2017: DYW seminars⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

This year’s Scottish Learning Festival continuous to offers a wide variety of DYW related seminars covering key issues such as curriculum pathways for all,  senior phase options, work-based learning in primary school, CLD, school/employer partnerships, etc .  Seminars will have direct inputs from practitioners, showcasing the practical implementation of DYW across all levels.

Outline of DYW related seminars:

Wednesday, 20 Sept:

Title Presenters Room/ Time
Keynote: “Everything around you that you call life was made up by people no smarter than you.” Josh Littlejohn, Social Entrepreneur and co-founder of Social Bite Lomond Auditorium,

12.30

DYW – building careers education in a primary setting Ruth McFarlane, Maisondieu Primary School, Angus Boisdale 2

9.30

Ayrshire works: senior phase partnership working in hospitality and engineering Carol Jenkins, Ayrshire College Boisdale 2,

12.30

Strengthening a community through enhancing skills for learning, life and work Mary Hume, St Mary’s Primary School, North Ayrshire Boisdale 2, 14.00
DYW – A CLD approach to the Work Placement Standards Elisha Fisher, Employment and Skills Partnership Team, Glasgow City Council Alsh 1,

14.00

Talking tomorrows: how do we develop the young workforce? Peter Kelly, Holy Cross High School, South Lanarkshire Boisdale 2, 15.15
The enterprising practitioner Heather Hughes, Scotland’s Enterprising Schools Boisdale 2,

16.00

Thursday 21 Sept.:

Title Presenters Room/ Time
Raising aspiration through WOW (World of Work) Cheryl Kelly, Barmulloch Primary School, Glasgow Boisdale 2

10.45

An inclusive curriculum for all! Gib McMillan, Craigroyston Community High School, Edinburgh Boisdale 2,

12.00

Access the complete SLF 2017 programme here.

 

The Scottish Attainment Challenge within overall school improvement⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

By Graeme Logan, Strategic Director, Education Scotland

We have a once in a career opportunity to make a significant breakthrough for children living in poverty in Scotland through the Scottish Attainment Challenge (SAC). The areas for improvement highlighted in our recent report ‘Quality and improvement in Scottish education 2012-2016’ (QuISE) report are all very relevant to our national mission to close the poverty-related attainment gap and to strive for excellence and equity for every child in Scotland.

SAC, including the Pupil Equity Fund (PEF), gives us the additional resources to transform children’s progress and attainment. I know that many headteachers I speak to are excited about the possibilities. They are also keen to make sure we make the best use of these resources.

At Education Scotland we aim to provide you with the best possible advice on what works. In addition to the inspection evidence in QuISE, our advice includes access to a Scottish version of the Education Endowment Foundation’s Learning and Teaching Toolkit, and also our own Interventions for Equity, which shares a range of interesting examples and approaches from Scottish schools which have been involved with the SAC programmes.

Other significant changes we have introduced this year will also help. These include clarity on the model of assessment for the broad general education, which is teacher judgement of children’s achievement of Curriculum for Excellence levels, informed by a range of evidence and high quality moderation.  This demonstrates the value and trust placed in our teachers to make overall judgements about children’s progress. In doing this, teachers helped us to create the new Benchmarks for literacy and numeracy, which clarify the national standard for the achievement of each level.

We are taking a broad definition of the attainment gap and are not just considering statistics on overall attainment in isolation. If we are to achieve the vision of Curriculum for Excellence we need to think about achievement in a range of areas too. Earlier this year I spoke to around 2,000 headteachers from every part of the country in a series of events. We encouraged them to think about the attainment gap in the context of five key areas:

  • Attendance
  • Attainment
  • Exclusion
  • Engagement
  • Participation

The first three may seem more obvious and in some respects easier to measure. However, engagement and participation are equally as important for children’s progress and development. Some schools have started to track all five areas, for example, observing the extent of children’s active engagement in learning through use of tools such as the Leuven Scale of Engagement.  They have also started to track the extent to which children participate in the school’s wider curriculum and wider offer.

Schools will not be able to make the breakthrough we want to see for children living in poverty on their own. Many third sector and partner organisations are making a major contribution to improving children’s progress and engagement, and there are examples on the National Improvement Hub; type ‘Scottish Attainment Challenge’ into the search box to see all our resources.

One of the most important partnerships is that with families and communities. In the first year of the Challenge this was the area in which we saw least activity, and we’re actively looking at how we can change that. Our Review of Family Learning provides a good evidence base and recommendations for ways in which family learning can be developed within communities.

With inspection looking at attainment (QI 3.2) from August, including how schools are using PEF to close the gap, now is a good time to self-evaluate your approach to attainment. We will be particularly interested in the rationale and initial decision making for the use of PEF, as we believe that this will be key to ensuring that the most effective interventions are selected for each individual school and community context.

Online collaboration is also a key feature of the Scottish Attainment Challenge. Our Yammer group on Glow for headteachers has over 1,000 members! The largest ever online collaboration between Scottish headteachers. My keynote presentation from the pupil equity conferences is available on the Yammer group. Further key materials will be shared through the Yammer group too. I am currently preparing a keynote presentation for our September Curriculum for Excellence conferences for headteachers. During this presentation I will discuss ways in which curriculum flexibility and curriculum design can be used to close the gap. I will also share the most effective approaches attainment advisors have shared and also draw on the key strengths from schools where HM Inspectors have evaluated the new QI on raising attainment and achievement.

Closing the poverty-related attainment gap is a national endeavour and something which many teachers feel passionate about. For many the main reason they entered the profession was to make the biggest difference to children’s chances in life, particularly those who live in poverty. Reflecting on QuISE’s five priorities for improvement, as well as the specific focuses of SAC, will help ensure the success of our drive to remove the pattern between lower attainment and living in poverty.

QuISE’s five improvement priorities are an excellent place to start.

Using evidence to improve outcomes in secondary⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

By Carol McDonald, HM Inspector and Lead Officer for secondary inspection

Time to reflect on inspection evidence is always an interesting and key part of our work. Reviewing our findings for the recent report ‘Quality and improvement in Scottish education 2012 – 2016’ (QuISE) highlighted some important strengths in the secondary sector over a period with significant changes to the curriculum.

Inspectors appreciate the opportunity inspection offers to engage in dialogue with staff, parents, partners of the school and the young people themselves.   We learn a great deal from our discussions which informs many aspects of our work.

You can read the secondary chapter from QuISE on our website.  In secondary schools, inspectors found the curriculum in most schools evolving as new qualifications replaced old ones. Much of the work in schools focused on implementing new qualifications and increasing the range of accreditation available to young people in the senior phase.

Staff in schools recognised that to continue to improve attainment, improvements to learning pathways from S1 to S3 are required. Young people are well supported by the good relationships they enjoy with their teachers. However, too much variability was observed in the quality of learning and teaching.  Schools need to continue to work to ensure staff share a good understanding of the best features of effective practice.

Our evidence shows that schools need to use the wide range of evidence available to ensure that school improvement planning is manageable and achievable. The evidence from Insight, and from teacher’s professional judgements on the progress of young people, needs better used to inform improvement planning.

Schools are working effectively with partners to develop the young workforce using a range of innovative approaches. Senior staff in schools are using the Career Education Standard 3-18 (CES), the Work Placement Standard (WPS) and Guidance on School/Employer Partnerships as a platform to promote and develop DYW in their schools.  The use of the standards and the guidance to align and co-ordinate activity is still at an early stage.  Teaching staff, young people and employers are not yet aware of the entitlements and the expectations within the standards and guidance.

Our inspections in the current academic year show improvements in arrangements for assessing and tracking the progress of young people across all aspects of their learning. Using this evidence to implement appropriate interventions for individuals is key to improving outcomes for young people.  Collating the evidence at a department, faculty and whole school level allows staff to analyse and act upon necessary improvements.   Central to this work is the reliability of the assessment evidence.  We are seeing teachers beginning to make good use of the benchmarks to support them in this essential work.

In the best examples, schools are identifying, and taking account of, a range of features which may influence outcomes for young people. This includes factors such as being “looked after” (LAC), living in areas of social deprivation (SIMD 1 and 2) and having identified additional support requirements.  These factors need taken into account when planning learning for young people.

As staff continue to work hard in the interests of their pupils, they recognise that they are part of a wider team of adults that provide the necessary support to help young people succeed. It is good to see, and hear about, the successes of schools in improving outcomes for the young people in their community.

As we look ahead to next year’s inspections, I look forward to seeing these areas develop further, helping improve attainment for our young people.

The Story of Me – increasing vocabulary recognition.⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

I am a primary school class teacher, based in Scotland. I teach Primary 2 (age 6 -7 years). I designed the Story of Me project to promote recall of vocabulary. It was inspired by an article I read recently by Turk et Al (2015) which found that children were more likely to recall target vocabulary if it […]

Quality and Improvement in GME⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

We have now published the individual chapters form the Quality and Improvement in Scottish Education report on our website, along with the full report. This report gives a review of our inspection findings for the period 2012-2016. It highlights areas of growing strength and key areas for further improvement.

 

For the first time, we have included a chapter on Gaelic Medium Education (GME) which exemplifies the growth of the sector. This chapter is available at:

 

PDF file: Gaelic Medium Education (126 KB)

 

The full report may be accessed at:

PDF file: Quality and improvement in Scottish education 2012-2016 (1.1 MB)

 

We would encourage those with responsibility for Gaelic Learner and Medium Education across sectors to engage with the report. In particular,  the findings for Gaelic and to build these into improvement planning.  Addressing these areas for improvement effectively will make a decisive contribution to achieving the twin aims of excellence and equity for Scottish learners which sits at the heart of the National Improvement Framework. For more information to support improvement, please use our Advice on Gaelic Education.

 

To keep up to date with Gaelic at Education Scotland, please visit our learning blog for Gaelic Medium Education and Gaelic Learner Education.   We also publish Briefings on Gaelic Education for which partners’ contributions are invited.

The 1+2 Languages Leadership Programme⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The national leadership programme, formerly known as Train the Trainer, is now open for registration. Invitations have gone out to local authority representatives and teacher education institutions. The programme has Professional Recognition accreditation from GTCS and is completely free of charge for educators in the public sector. This begins with a Summer School which will take place from Monday 3rd to Friday 7th July 2017 at the University of Strathclyde’s city centre campus in Glasgow. There will be a session led by Education Scotland on the Curriculum for Excellence Benchmarks for Gaelic (Learners). Teachers interested in the Programme should contact their education authority’s 1+2/Gaelic officer.

Children’s Library Club⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

“Children can only aspire to what they know exists.” Glasgow Children’s University, 2016 This statement illustrates the philosophy behind the Children’s Library club, offered to pupils of St Mungo’s Primary School every Wednesday from 3 o’clock, with students from the School of Education at the University of Strathclyde having full responsibility for planning, organising and […]