Tag Archives: privacy

I like Instagram but..⤴

from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

I’ve seen this linked a few times recently, finally clicked.

– […] we may keep, use and share your personal information with companies connected with Instagram. This information includes your name, email address, school, where you live, pictures, phone number, your likes and dislikes, where you go, who your friends are, how often you use Instagram, and any other personal information we find such as your birthday or who you are chatting with, including in private messages (DMs).

from: A lawyer rewrote Instagram’s terms of service for kids. Now you can understand all of the private data you and your teen are giving up to social media — Quartz

I’ll be sharing this with my pupils soon.

    Turning off some Google juice, back to thing 4⤴

    from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

    IMG_0163.jpeg

    Although I’ve not been blogging about all of the 23 things, I’ve though a little about most of them. This item from my feed reader:

    Google Has Quietly Dropped Ban on Personally Identifiable Web Tracking – ProPublica got me thinking more about thing 4 digital security

    To opt-out of Google’s identified tracking, visit the Activity controls on Google’s My Account page, and uncheck the box next to “Include Chrome browsing history and activity from websites and apps that use Google services.” You can also delete past activity from your account.

    After that I headed over to the Google My Account page and turned off as much as I could.

    Turning off some Google juice, back to thing 4⤴

    from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

    IMG_0163.jpeg

    Although I’ve not been blogging about all of the 23 things, I’ve though a little about most of them. This item from my feed reader:

    Google Has Quietly Dropped Ban on Personally Identifiable Web Tracking – ProPublica got me thinking more about thing 4 digital security

    To opt-out of Google’s identified tracking, visit the Activity controls on Google’s My Account page, and uncheck the box next to “Include Chrome browsing history and activity from websites and apps that use Google services.” You can also delete past activity from your account.

    After that I headed over to the Google My Account page and turned off as much as I could.

    Leaders and Monitors: The best and the worst of education technology⤴

    from @ Open World

    Last week I attended the Holyrood Connect Learning Through Technology event where I saw a rather jawdropping demonstration of the very best and very worst that education technology has to offer. The best, and it really was wonderful, came from teachers Natalie Lockhead and Nicola Paterson, and pupils Rebecca and Stephen from Kirklandneuk Primary School, who are part of the school’s Digital Leaders Network. The Digital Leaders Network encourages children who are confident with using all kinds of technology to support their teachers and peers by sharing their skills and knowledge, while at the same time enabling the children to develop confidence, literacy and skills for life.

    Stephen and Rebecca stood up in front of an audience of over a hundred delegates and spoke confidently and articulately about the importance of the Digital Leaders initiative and how much they enjoyed and benefitted from being part of it. Inspirational has become a rather throwaway term used to describe speakers, but these young people really, truly, were an inspiration.

    Their honesty, enthusiasm and willingness to share was in stark contrast to the previous presenters and event sponsors Lightspeed Systems who presented their “online safety and web filtering systems” for education. As well as just blocking content, Lightspeed’s Web Filter also incorporates hierarchical filtering “to keep students safe, even when they leave the classroom,” along with web activity reporting functionality “from the high level to the detail”. I presume in this instance “the detail” means individual students.

    According to their press, Lightspeed Systems create tools to help schools manage and filter their networks as well as empower classroom learning. There  doesn’t seem to be any mention of trivial issues such as privacy, ethics and consent. One of their products, Classroom Orchestrator, is designed to allow teachers to monitor students screens and devices “making it easy to see who’s off-task, who needs extra attention, and who’s excelling”. Orchestrator allows teachers to view all students screens from a dashboard, “ensures safety by seeing who is protected by the webfilter and who isn’t”, and perhaps most worryingly, “record sessions to store a students activity to share or investigate.” This immediately rang all sorts of alarm bells; where is that data being stored, who owns it, who has access to it? Although Lightspeed’s products are primarily designed for use on schools’ own mobile devices, the presenter added that they can also be installed on children’s own mobile devices and can be used to monitor their web activity outwith school hours. Apparently they’ve had, and I quote, “Lots of positive feedback about teachers taking control of and locking apps on students’ mobile devices.” That was the point where my jaw really hit the floor.

    I made a point of asking during questions who owned and had access to the data that Lightspeed gathers. The reply was that the data is stored on servers in the UK and clients have the right to access this data under the Freedom of Information act. Seriously? I asked again if clients really had to submit an FOI request to access their own data and the presenter replied that they could just e-mail their sales representative for access. I lost the will to live at that point.

    The contrast between the two presentations couldn’t have been more stark, and both demonstrated in quite different ways, why it is so important to engage children and learners in their own education, why we need to listen to them, not eavesdrop on them, and why we need to respect their privacy and consent. And most of all, it brought home to me just how critical trust and openness has to be in our use of technology in education. After all, if we don’t trust and learn from our children, how will they ever learn to trust and respect others?

    NB Throughout the presentation, the Lightspeed representative seemed to refer to Classroom Orchestrator as Classroom Monitor. There is another UK based ed tech company called Classroom Monitor that markets an assessment platform for teachers. There is no link between Lightspeed Systems and Classroom Monitor and their products are not related.


    Leaders and Monitors: The best and the worst of education technology⤴

    from

    Last week I attended the Holyrood Connect Learning Through Technology event where I saw a rather jawdropping demonstration of the very best and very worst that education technology has to offer. The best, and it really was wonderful, came from teachers Natalie Lockhead and Nicola Paterson, and pupils Rebecca and Stephen from Kirklandneuk Primary School, who are part of the school’s Digital Leaders Network. The Digital Leaders Network encourages children who are confident with using all kinds of technology to support their teachers and peers by sharing their skills and knowledge, while at the same time enabling the children to develop confidence, literacy and skills for life.

    Stephen and Rebecca stood up in front of an audience of over a hundred delegates and spoke confidently and articulately about the importance of the Digital Leaders initiative and how much they enjoyed and benefitted from being part of it. Inspirational has become a rather throwaway term used to describe speakers, but these young people really, truly, were an inspiration.

    Their honesty, enthusiasm and willingness to share was in stark contrast to the previous presenters and event sponsors Lightspeed Systems who presented their “online safety and web filtering systems” for education. As well as just blocking content, Lightspeed’s Web Filter also incorporates hierarchical filtering “to keep students safe, even when they leave the classroom,” along with web activity reporting functionality “from the high level to the detail”. I presume in this instance “the detail” means individual students.

    According to their press, Lightspeed Systems create tools to help schools manage and filter their networks as well as empower classroom learning. There  doesn’t seem to be any mention of trivial issues such as privacy, ethics and consent. One of their products, Classroom Orchestrator, is designed to allow teachers to monitor students screens and devices “making it easy to see who’s off-task, who needs extra attention, and who’s excelling”. Orchestrator allows teachers to view all students screens from a dashboard, “ensures safety by seeing who is protected by the webfilter and who isn’t”, and perhaps most worryingly, “record sessions to store a students activity to share or investigate.” This immediately rang all sorts of alarm bells; where is that data being stored, who owns it, who has access to it? Although Lightspeed’s products are primarily designed for use on schools’ own mobile devices, the presenter added that they can also be installed on children’s own mobile devices and can be used to monitor their web activity outwith school hours. Apparently they’ve had, and I quote, “Lots of positive feedback about teachers taking control of and locking apps on students’ mobile devices.” That was the point where my jaw really hit the floor.

    I made a point of asking during questions who owned and had access to the data that Lightspeed gathers. The reply was that the data is stored on servers in the UK and clients have the right to access this data under the Freedom of Information act. Seriously? I asked again if clients really had to submit an FOI request to access their own data and the presenter replied that they could just e-mail their sales representative for access. I lost the will to live at that point.

    The contrast between the two presentations couldn’t have been more stark, and both demonstrated in quite different ways, why it is so important to engage children and learners in their own education, why we need to listen to them, not eavesdrop on them, and why we need to respect their privacy and consent. And most of all, it brought home to me just how critical trust and openness has to be in our use of technology in education. After all, if we don’t trust and learn from our children, how will they ever learn to trust and respect others?

    NB Throughout the presentation, the Lightspeed representative seemed to refer to Classroom Orchestrator as Classroom Monitor. There is another UK based ed tech company called Classroom Monitor that markets an assessment platform for teachers. There is no link between Lightspeed Systems and Classroom Monitor and their products are not related.

    Draftback amazing document playback⤴

    from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

    Draftback is a Chrome extension that lets you play back any Google Doc’s revision history (for docs you can edit). It’s like going back in time to look over your own shoulder as you write.

    from: Get Draftback to Play Back Google Docs

    The above is not a video but an embed from Draftback!

    Quite amazing, in the short playback above you can see how horrible a typist I am and also see Ian Stuart adding text to the document at the same time as me!

    After I posted on G+ this Martian Hawksey commented with a link How I reverse-engineered Google Docs to play back any document’s keystrokes « James Somers (jsomers.net). Which give detail of the creation, a fascinating read.

    The data that Google stores is, as you might expect, kind of incredible. What we actually have is not just a coarse “video” of a document — we have the complete history of every single character. Draftback is aware of this history, and assigns each character a persistent unique ID, which makes it possible to do stuff that I don’t think folks have really done to a piece of writing before.

    And among explanations that go over my head things like this:

    When you’re using Google Docs, you’re not actually typing into where you think you’re typing. You’re typing into a textarea in an iFrame off-screen, and through the postMessage API, those events are being sent to the “edit surface” that you see, which does stuff like draw your cursor. (Your cursor on Docs isn’t actually a cursor, it’s a 2px-wide div!)

    from: How I reverse-engineered Google Docs to play back any document’s keystrokes « James Somers (jsomers.net)

    Would this be a useful tool in the classroom? For discussing pupil work or demonstrating writing?

    Can I Be Your Friend?⤴

    from @ Highland E-Safety

    From time to time, links to video clips which are particularly effective and worth sharing with pupils and parents alike, will be posted on this blog.

    The link below is to a fun video clip (created by English National Opera) which ably demonstrates how our actions, requests and even terminology used in the ‘online world’ can look very silly and desperate when translated into the ‘real’ world. This clip was shown to P6 and P7 pupils at Milton of Leys Primary yesterday (Mon 12th May’14) and generated much discussion and proved to be more thought provoking than originally expected.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDycZH0CA4I

     


    Google and Glow- Some Thoughts⤴

    from @ Jim Henderson's Blog



    apps_ring.jpg


    Google has decided to pull out of the Glow procurement process.

    Google opt out.tiff

    This will come as a bit of a shock to some folk in Scottish education who have been keen for Google Apps for Education to be the basis of the next iteration of Glow. Google will instead concentrate in trying to work with individual local authorities to provide it’s Apps For Education package. Apart from the concerns this must raise about fragmentation my concerns about Google Apps and Google being involved in Scottish education continue. I have always had real concerns about Google and the privacy of an individuals data collected by Google. These concerns have grown over the last couple of months.

    I always was sceptical about Google Apps in education. Although Google say’s in its privacy policy about Apps for Education that they do not track or collect personal data there is a real sense question of trust around Google. Teachers and parents want to be totally convinced. Personally I don’t trust Google as a corporation anymore.

    Why?

    Here are some reasons

    Google’s business model – the selling of ads targeted on individual user behaviour – relies on collecting browsing information from its visitors. Before Thursday 28th of February 2012 different services did not share this information. This meant a search on, for example, YouTube, would not affect the results or advertising you would encounter on another Google site such as Gmail. The new agreement, which users cannot opt out of unless they stop using Google’s services, will mean activity on all of the company’s sites will be linked. Here are just part of the terms of use  “When you upload or otherwise submit content to our Services, you give Google (and those we work with) a worldwide license to use, host, store, reproduce, modify, create derivative works (such as those resulting from translations, adaptations or other changes we make so that your content works better with our Services), communicate, publish, publicly perform, publicly display and distribute such content,” says the new and unified privacy policy of Google, which came to effect on March 1, 2012.

    This change in privacy policy has led Viviane Reding, the European commissioner of justice, to say there are ‘doubts’ over the legality of internet giant’s move as French authorities open EU-wide investigation.


    Google subverted mobile Safari’s default protections to track users in ways they did not agree to be tracked,  as the Wall Street Journal reported: “The findings appeared to contradict some of Google’s own instructions to Safari users on how to avoid tracking.”

    Google illegally accepted ads for Canadian pharmacies with the purpose of delivering them to American users.


    Google and personal data

    What about the data Google might hold on pupils and teachers?   What if I wanted to find out what information Google had collected about me then as an EU citizen under EU -wide data protection rules, anyone can send a written request for their full data and, for a small fee, the company has to ship it out, usually within 40 days. As this article recently in the Guardian points out “The company has a main US branch, Google Inc, and subsidiaries within other countries. In the UK, that’s Google UK Ltd. Here’s the catch: Google UK Ltd, which is subject to the EU rules that let you access your data, doesn’t hold it. As Google says in a statement: “Please note that Google UK Ltd does not process any personal data in relation to Google services, which are provided by Google Inc, a US-incorporated company whose address you can find in the Google privacy policy.” While we can find Google Inc’s address, that doesn’t necessarily help: a spokeswoman for the UK regulator, the ICO, confirmed that EU laws on subject access requests do not extend to the US parent company. This means there’s no real chance of getting hold of user data from Google through this route.”

    Google Apps for Government Concerns.

    These concerns about Google, trust and privacy are spreading. According to SafeGov.org experts Jeff Gould and Karen Evans, “Google’s recent changes to its privacy policy allowing it to combine information about users pulled from the entire range of its online products raises serious privacy concerns for Google Apps For Government (GAFG) that should not be overlooked by public sector officials who have already made the move to the cloud or who are looking to move to the cloud.”

    Norwegian and German Public Sector concerns.
    Norwegian public sector organisations will be banned from using Google Apps after the Norwegian data protection authorities ruled that the service could put citizens’ personal data at risk.

    The data protection authority said Google Apps did not comply with Norwegian privacy laws because there was insufficient information about where data was being kept.



    Given this growing concern it is probably just as well that Google decided to walk away from the national procurement for Glow. The question is will individual local authorities in Scotland want to use Google Apps in Education?