Tag Archives: Primary Education

Google Education Roadshow @kingussiehigh #NDLW17 #digitaldifference⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

Kingussie Event - OB Keynote

Well it is the end of National Digital Learning Week in Scotland (#NDLW17).

I started the week by hosting and keynoting the Scottish leg of the Google in Education UK Roadshow at Kingussie High School and finished the week by having my latest resource 'Leading a Digital Learning Strategy' published by the Scottish College for Educational Leadership (SCEL) as part of their Framework for Education Leadership. More about that here.

The Google Event had a real buzz about it on Monday and it was great to have an opportunity to work with the wider roadshow team, who are currently touring the UK as part of the Google in Education Fuel the Future Tour. A special shout out must go to Louise Jones, Oli Trussell, James Leonard and Dean Stokes for their excellent presentations - I certainly learnt a lot and realised that there are lots more features within G-Suite for Education that we could be exploiting at school.

It was also great to have 20 local authorities represented at the event and a good blend between practitioners, local authority advisors and policy makers. I am interested to see what G-Suite looks like within Glow when it becomes available as part of the productivity suite in August this year.

Kingussie Google Event - May 2017

The theme of this years National Digital Learning Week was making a #digitaldifference and for a little school in the middle of the Cairngorm National Park I think we certainly punch well above our weight in terms of making a #digitaldifference. The map below is a nice illustration of just some of our influence in the last week.18527383_10158619884970702_49681753105711023_o

 

Google Education Roadshow @kingussiehigh #NDLW17 #digitaldifference⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

Kingussie Event - OB Keynote

Well it is the end of National Digital Learning Week in Scotland (#NDLW17).

I started the week by hosting and keynoting the Scottish leg of the Google in Education UK Roadshow at Kingussie High School and finished the week by having my latest resource 'Leading a Digital Learning Strategy' published by the Scottish College for Educational Leadership (SCEL) as part of their Framework for Education Leadership. More about that here.

The Google Event had a real buzz about it on Monday and it was great to have an opportunity to work with the wider roadshow team, who are currently touring the UK as part of the Google in Education Fuel the Future Tour. A special shout out must go to Louise Jones, Oli Trussell, James Leonard and Dean Stokes for their excellent presentations - I certainly learnt a lot and realised that there are lots more features within G-Suite for Education that we could be exploiting at school.

It was also great to have 20 local authorities represented at the event and a good blend between practitioners, local authority advisors and policy makers. I am interested to see what G-Suite looks like within Glow when it becomes available as part of the productivity suite in August this year.

Kingussie Google Event - May 2017

The theme of this years National Digital Learning Week was making a #digitaldifference and for a little school in the middle of the Cairngorm National Park I think we certainly punch well above our weight in terms of making a #digitaldifference. The map below is a nice illustration of just some of our influence in the last week.18527383_10158619884970702_49681753105711023_o

 

Keynote at “III Simposio Internacional sobre Mobile Learning” – Savilla, Spain (@simposioml #simposioml)⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

Mobile Learning Spain

A few weekends ago I found myself keynoting "III Simposio Internacional sobre Mobile Learning" in Savilla, Spain. I don't do many of these things anymore so it was great to dig out some old slides and mix them with a few new ideas.

I said that I would share the slidedeck with the audience and you can view it here. 

Some great conversations over the 24 hours that I was in town. Was particularly impressed with Touchcast and I also enjoyed learning about some of the opportunities and challenges of the Spanish Education System. Savilla was a really nice city to explore as well and I look forward to getting back to visit at some point.

Ollie in Spain

 

Keynote at “III Simposio Internacional sobre Mobile Learning” – Savilla, Spain (@simposioml #simposioml)⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

Mobile Learning Spain

A few weekends ago I found myself keynoting "III Simposio Internacional sobre Mobile Learning" in Savilla, Spain. I don't do many of these things anymore so it was great to dig out some old slides and mix them with a few new ideas.

I said that I would share the slidedeck with the audience and you can view it here. 

Some great conversations over the 24 hours that I was in town. Was particularly impressed with Touchcast and I also enjoyed learning about some of the opportunities and challenges of the Spanish Education System. Savilla was a really nice city to explore as well and I look forward to getting back to visit at some point.

Ollie in Spain

 

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 4 of 17 – Meet and Mingle [@raff31]⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

Built into the programme of the week was a chance to share some interesting practice that was going on within your own school, district or country. These session were called ‘meet and mingle’ and they were spread over three session and two days around the themes

Theme One: Ed Tech, 1:1 Computing, tech solutions and frameworks

Theme Two: Education Transformation and leadership

Theme Three: Professional Learning and learning models/process 

I spoke in Theme Two: Education Transformation and leadership, about some of the work we have been doing at Kingussie High School. I also had a chance to talk about some of the wider policy drivers in Scottish Education.

In the session that I wasn’t presenting I valued the chance to get a round and see what other countries / schools were doing. I like education policy and its sessions like this that allow you to ‘borrow’ the best ideas from other systems and re-vent them for your own benefit.

20151012_161031

(interesting to find out about whats happening in Trinidad & Tobago)

During the 1:1 Strand it was pleasing to see that the steps we have taken within our own 1:1 role out in Kingussie seems to be consistent with emergent thinking from other areas. Pretty much everything we have done in Kingussie has been based on interesting practice borrowed from around the world and it was good to see that we seem to be holding our own when compared to bigger countries and global school districts.

Another key thing that I was reminded about during the session is how flexible and forward thinking the Scottish system actually is. It was evidence that a number of the other systems straightjacket creativity  and rely far to heavily in standardised test scores as the sole source of measuring student achievement.

20151012_154008

However, the person who stole the show at the ‘Meet and Mingle’ was Peter Rafferty or the ‘Glittery man’ as he quickly became known. Peter who teaches at Green Park Primary School (and does a whole heap of other things as well) had brought in letters from a number of children at his school explaining how they personally used technology both at home and at school. The letters were addressed to ‘the Intel people’ and all the delegates were tasked with replying to a letter from one of the children – felt tip pens, glitter and foam decorative shapes were obligatory in the reply. It was great to see everybody (including John Galvin) get involved.

It was lovely, powerful idea and great to be reminded about the importance of ‘low-tech’ at a technology conference. After all who actually gets a letter (that is not a bill) anymore – I am sure the children at Green Park will enjoy reading the replies (I just want to apologise in advance for my handwriting!).

Intel Letters

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 4 of 17 – Meet and Mingle [@raff31]⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

Built into the programme of the week was a chance to share some interesting practice that was going on within your own school, district or country. These session were called ‘meet and mingle’ and they were spread over three session and two days around the themes

Theme One: Ed Tech, 1:1 Computing, tech solutions and frameworks

Theme Two: Education Transformation and leadership

Theme Three: Professional Learning and learning models/process 

I spoke in Theme Two: Education Transformation and leadership, about some of the work we have been doing at Kingussie High School. I also had a chance to talk about some of the wider policy drivers in Scottish Education.

In the session that I wasn’t presenting I valued the chance to get a round and see what other countries / schools were doing. I like education policy and its sessions like this that allow you to ‘borrow’ the best ideas from other systems and re-vent them for your own benefit.

20151012_161031

(interesting to find out about whats happening in Trinidad & Tobago)

During the 1:1 Strand it was pleasing to see that the steps we have taken within our own 1:1 role out in Kingussie seems to be consistent with emergent thinking from other areas. Pretty much everything we have done in Kingussie has been based on interesting practice borrowed from around the world and it was good to see that we seem to be holding our own when compared to bigger countries and global school districts.

Another key thing that I was reminded about during the session is how flexible and forward thinking the Scottish system actually is. It was evidence that a number of the other systems straightjacket creativity  and rely far to heavily in standardised test scores as the sole source of measuring student achievement.

20151012_154008

However, the person who stole the show at the ‘Meet and Mingle’ was Peter Rafferty or the ‘Glittery man’ as he quickly became known. Peter who teaches at Green Park Primary School (and does a whole heap of other things as well) had brought in letters from a number of children at his school explaining how they personally used technology both at home and at school. The letters were addressed to ‘the Intel people’ and all the delegates were tasked with replying to a letter from one of the children – felt tip pens, glitter and foam decorative shapes were obligatory in the reply. It was great to see everybody (including John Galvin) get involved.

It was lovely, powerful idea and great to be reminded about the importance of ‘low-tech’ at a technology conference. After all who actually gets a letter (that is not a bill) anymore – I am sure the children at Green Park will enjoy reading the replies (I just want to apologise in advance for my handwriting!).

Intel Letters

What Works Best in Education: the Politics of Collaborative Expertise – [Prof. John Hattie Research]⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

John Hattie 2015

In his new June 2015 report (‘What Works Best in Education: the Politics of Collaborative Expertise’) Professor John Hattie asks ‘How do we increase the expertise of all teachers?’

IRIS Connect have dissected the paper on their blog and quite nicely condensed eight of the key tasks that Hattie believes need to be established in order to achieve conditions to nurture the collaborative expertise of teachers within a school.

The eight key ideas are:

1. Shift the narrative to collaborative expertise and student progression.

Hattie says, “re-framing the conversation away from its current focus on standards and achievement and towards progress is the first step. As well as recognising that everyone, from teachers and school leaders to parents and policy makers, should be working together towards ensuring every child receives at least one year’s worth of progress for one year’s input”.

 

2. Agree on what a year’s progress looks like across all subjects, schools and system levels.

Hattie says, “What a year’s progress looks like needs to be debated and agreed upon among educators. This will reduce variability in teachers’ understanding of challenge and progression for students and truly accelerate progress.”

 

3. Expect a year’s worth of progress by raising expectations that all students can achieve.

Hattie says, Research proves that one of the greatest influences on learning is the expectations of students and teachers. When teachers have high expectations of their students, those students tend to be very successful in achieving their goals.”

 

4. Develop new assessment and evaluation tools to provide feedback to teachers.

Hattie says, “We need to find improved ways of helping students and teachers to better teaching and learning through assessment. Evaluation tools shouldn’t measure learning, they should help to shape it.”

 

5. Know the impact by making sure that all teachers take responsibility for the impact of everyone in the school on the progress of students.

Hattie says, Schools need to become evaluators of impact and experts at interpreting the effects of teachers and teaching on all students.

Schools should create environments that enable excellent teaching and strong communication with a focus on making an impact,  where teachers identify what success looks like and the magnitude of the impact before they start teaching.”

 

6. Ensure teachers have expertise in diagnosis, interventions and evaluation through teachers working together as evaluators though self-evaluation of their impact on their students.

Hattie says, “Teachers need to be experts at diagnosis, interventions and evaluation. They need to understand what each student already knows and where they need to go next, as well as what interventions to use to get them there and then how to evaluate the impact they have made.”

 

7. Stop ignoring what we know and scale up success by using the wealth of knowledge that exists in teacher communities

Hattie says, “We have an enormous wealth of knowledge already about how to address certain challenges that students face. Teachers should be encouraged to share and use the existing expertise that has been proven to work.”

 

8. Link autonomy to a year’s progress by studying teachers who are achieving a year of student progress and supporting teachers who aren’t 

 

You can download the full report here and it makes interesting reading when you put it in the context of Scottish Education. I wonder how many teacher actually know what one year (or stage) of progress looks like within the context of the curriculum both in the BGE and Senior Phase?

Can computers keep secrets? How a Six-Year-Old’s Curiosity Could Change the World [Book Review] @NoTosh⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

Can Computers Keep Secrets

I’ve known Tom Barrett for years and followed his career as a classroom teacher (communicated though his Blog ICT in my Classroom), to school senior leader (http://edte.ch/blog) to his most recent position as senior consultant for NoTosh Australia.

One of the many things that I respect about Tom is that his practice has always been firmly rooted in teaching and learning. Over time I have enjoyed following his classroom and, more recently, his international adventures. Having read his blog for a long time, it will come as no surprise that I was looking forward to reading his first (I am sure there will be more!) book titled, ‘Can computers keep secrets? How a Six-Year-Old's Curiosity Could Change the World.


Published by NoTosh I was even more excited by the looming launch when I read a tweet from Joanna Moult (the books published / editor) which said,

“Ooh! Our first @NoTosh book by @tombarrett has just arrived in proof form and it looks GORGEOUS. pic.twitter.com/nZQ2CgACQ3


So, stranded (mid-afternoon) in a bar in Reykjavík, Iceland (it really is a hard life!) I downloaded the book to my kindle.

Toms BookFor some reason (probably because of the word ‘beautiful’) I had it in my head that the book would be full of pictures? And I was initially a bit disappointed not to see any pictures as a flicked though some of the digital pages.

Now I didn’t intend to read the full book.

But, as I was waiting for the rain to stop outside I started to read the first few pages. Another pint and a couple of hours later I ran out of text having digested a beautiful and addictive read – lost in Tom’s words, the time just seemed to slip away as I found myself nodding and smiling as I weaved my way through the text.

The narrative is wonderfully written, highly personal, linked with beautiful prose combining both personal observations, thoughts and research.

Through real-life questions from Tom's six year old boy, "George' including...

  • If you had super powers how do you control them?
  • What is the crumbliest thing in the world?
  • How tall is a rainbow?
  • Why do brains work at night?
  • Does Darth Vader have freckles?

…Tom explores what it means to be curious and the importance of children asking questions to help them understand an increasingly complex world.

Reading the book helps remind us as people who work with children that we should be developing curiosity rather than extracting it from young people as they move through our school systems.

The book also reminded me of a quote from Jesse Schell and what he has often described as the 'curiosity gap'. 

 

“Curiosity is not something we talk about in schools, but it is more important now than it has been in the whole of human history.

It used to be that a curious child would learn something. Now all of human knowledge is available at the touch of a button, which gives curious children a serious advantage. Anything they would like to learn about or do, they can find out about in an instant. So what does that mean for children who are not curious? They are going to be left far behind, creating what is known as the “curiosity gap”.

I am not sure that we really know if children are born more curious or less curious, or whether there are things we can do to encourage and enhance their curiosity. Perhaps the most important thing we can do in the field of education is figure out whether we can make children more curious.”

(source)

Overall 'Can computers keep secrets? How a Six-Year-Old's Curiosity Could Change the World' is a great bit of work and a thought piece that will stand the test of time – I’m also sure that we will see a few more titles from Ewan and his NoTosh Team in the coming months and years.

But for now, ‘well done Tom, its fab!’ - I even read it agian on the plane home!

(Banner Photo: Source)