Tag Archives: poetry

iPads: Words and Pictures⤴

from @ wwwd – John's World Wide Wall Display

This is pretty basic stuff but I’ve found it useful in class.

I’ve often combined writing poetry with digital tools in the classroom. There are a lot of short forms that mean even the slowest typist can produce something good in limited time. From a pupil blogging perspective pupils of varying ability often get great results they can be proud of publishing.

When I started using iPads in teachers training and with pupils, I started using simple poetry forms as a way to produce something quickly that could develop from text be combined with images, video and audio.

Good, IMO, forms are kennings, lunes, haiku and six word stories.

Back then we used skitch and comic life to added text to pictures. More recently I moved on to the free version of pic collage 1.

When I arrived back in the classroom with a pile of iPads I’ve been using the technique quite a bit.

More recently 2 I’ve cut out third party apps to use the newish built in markup in the Photos app. Recently I demoed the process at an interview and saw Jenni Robertson show it at an Apple event in Glasgow. On both occasions I was surprised to find that it was a new concept to most of the audience. I though it might be worth a post here. There is a video embedded at the bottom of this post, but here are some written instructions.

Start with an image

This is a good opportunity to talk and demo a wee bit about copyright and attribution. In class we often use the Morguefile or my own FlickrCC Stampr.

write some words

I believe it is best to use the notes app for this, avoiding thinking about how the text looks, where it goes etc.

Copy the text to the clipboard.

Combine the words and pictures

Open photos

Select and view the image.

Click on the adjustment icon

When the photo opens click on the ellipses and then Markup

On the markup screen click the T tool to add a text box and then press on the box to edit it.

 

Paste in your poem.

Adjust the size, colour and placing of the text.

Bonus Tip – drop shadow

Duplicate the text, change the colour of one and move the top one over the bottom leaving a nice ‘old style’ drop shadow. I think this is worth it as a intro to layers in graphics. It can also hep readability on complex backgrounds.

 

 

Although this is a very simple lesson I think it give the opportunity to teach a few different things over and above literacy involved in the writing:

  • Copyright and creative commons
  • Combining apps (safari, notes, photos) in a workflow.
  • Layers

It has the potential for being extended into video & audio editing (groups pictures perhaps) and sharing the results.

Here is a quick screencast.

 

1. Some examples from my class using pic collage Frosty Photos and Poems – Banton Biggies

2. For example Kennings, we know about animals – Banton Biggies

above

Frozen Words⤴

from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

I’ve had a long term interest in digital ‘fridge’ poetry, making my first efforts with Flash around 15 years ago. A year or so ago I was excited by Fridge Poetry – Google Sheets as Database by Tom Woodward. There were a couple of goodies in that post, getting the word list from a google sheet and a nifty way to allow folk to easily make their own. I made a sheet and a poem and slotted the idea away.

I’ve revisited Tom’s post (and others) a few times, gathering tools 1 and wondering.

On the holiday weekend, given poor weather and a head cold, I revisited the idea and made my own Fridge.

This riffs & extends the idea a wee bit:

  1. You can add a background image to the poem, either from a built in flickr search or a local one.
  2. There is a standard common word list and a topical one from the google sheet.
  3. The words in the lists can be used more than once.
  4. I used JavaScript as opposed to php (except for proxying images to allow you to export).
  5. You can export the poem as an image.

I’ve edited Tom’s template a little, the new one:

  • Automatically generated a link to use. Tom got you to copy paste in the sheets own url and parsed that.
  • Adds a field for the image search.

Make a List this link should get you to create a copy of the list spreadsheet. You can edit the words (on the 2nd worksheet) and change the image search,  more info: Fridge Poetry.

Learning

I’ve gained a wee bit more JavaScript and jQuery. The idea of using Google sheets to populate a webpage or to display info from a sheet in a template is interesting. html2canvas is another tool that has interesting potential for storytelling on the web.

Using /copy at the end of a google sheet to allow anyone to make a copy is useful too.

Finally the ability of google sheets to get the id of the current sheet is really handy in simplifying the creation of links. This relies on a very simple script:

function getSheetID() {
  var r = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet().getId();
return r;

}

you can then get the id by typing =getSheetID() in a cell.

Next

There is more help on how to make and use a wordlist here: Fridge Poetry.

Hopefully someone will find this fun of useful, if you do and create new wordlists please let me know.

A Treaty with metaphor⤴

from @ blethers



I've been listening quite a bit to Leonard Cohen's final album - You want it darker - and in particular to one song that many, including me, regard as his last. Treaty, a song which is reprised by a string quartet as the final track on the disc, has provoked several thoughtful responses, ranging from questions about its meaning to personal accounts of how it has come to symbolise and to soothe at this particular time in the writers' lives.

It's got me thinking too. Cohen was "a Sabbath-observant Jew", we are told, and his language reflects that background - but not only that. In Treaty, some of the symbolism comes from Jewish tradition - the fields rejoicing at Jubilee; some that is as familiar to Christian as to Jew - the serpent in the Garden; reference to changing the water into wine sounds like the marriage at Cana, in the Christian canon. Elsewhere on the album there is the juxtaposition of Jewish prayer with reference to the Crucifixion - and to me the effect is of a seamless blending of imagery which has a profound effect.

But then, I'm a Christian - I belong within a certain tradition, just as Cohen belonged in his. The joy for me is that the imagery works, so that without spelling it out I gain an insight into the regrets and compromises that we recognise as we grow old, and claim them as my own. But when I say that, am I asserting the rightness of my interpretation? Am I succeeding in what, to the best of my remembrance, Matthew Arnold demanded - to see the object as in itself it really is? I had to write an essay on this, the first essay set in the Ordinary English Class at Glasgow University in October 1964; I wish I could rewrite it now, when I have so much more to bring to it than the frantic garnering of other people's ideas that my essay amounted to then. But I digress.

What I'm trying to say is this: because I have access to a wide-ranging framework of imagery gained through several decades of worshipping and reading in a Christian context, I feel a resonance with Cohen's song. But if I were to attempt to explain it to a completely non-religious person, someone who has not grown up with the language, someone who has resolutely turned their back on such nebulous superstition, I would find it much harder - or at least, I would have to find another set of metaphors and different imagery to lay out that which I have a shorthand for.

So is all religion, in the end, set out in metaphor? My hero, the poet-priest R.S.Thomas, thought so. In a video clip the interviewer John Osmond asks RS Thomas whether his rôles as poet and priest conflict. No, he replies, because poetry is metaphor, and religion is also metaphor. He sees no conflict between administering the Christian sacraments, which are metaphor, and administering the metaphor of poetry. I have that video somewhere, though for want of a suitable connection to my TV I can no longer play it. But the memory of that interview sticks in my mind, and points to what I now recognise as my own position.

We use language to describe our experience. When we experience something new, we describe it in terms of the familiar, the known. When we continue to experience this, we perhaps change our similes into metaphor - so, God is no longer "like" something else (or like nothing we've ever experienced at all), God "is" something else. And then the attributes of the original something else become God's also, and the metaphor hardens with each accretion. Before you know where you are, God (or any other spiritual experience for which you originally had no words) has become solid, fixed, immutable - and lost something in the process.

I fear I'm drifting into territory where others, much more learned than I, already hold sway. Bear with me, folks - I'm doing this for myself. But the wonderful thing about Leonard Cohen's song - and about many, many more that he wrote in a lifelong pursuit of what he called "blackening pages" - is that he never himself explained what he meant. He left it to us to respond. And that, now that he's gone, is what people are doing in droves.

And this, I offer, is the antithesis of what I hate about organised religion. There is plenty to love, but rigid fundamentalism isn't part of that. Let's hear it for metaphor, and the freedom to respond: I do not care who takes this bloody hill.

A Treaty with metaphor⤴

from @ blethers



I've been listening quite a bit to Leonard Cohen's final album - You want it darker - and in particular to one song that many, including me, regard as his last. Treaty, a song which is reprised by a string quartet as the final track on the disc, has provoked several thoughtful responses, ranging from questions about its meaning to personal accounts of how it has come to symbolise and to soothe at this particular time in the writers' lives.

It's got me thinking too. Cohen was "a Sabbath-observant Jew", we are told, and his language reflects that background - but not only that. In Treaty, some of the symbolism comes from Jewish tradition - the fields rejoicing at Jubilee; some that is as familiar to Christian as to Jew - the serpent in the Garden; reference to changing the water into wine sounds like the marriage at Cana, in the Christian canon. Elsewhere on the album there is the juxtaposition of Jewish prayer with reference to the Crucifixion - and to me the effect is of a seamless blending of imagery which has a profound effect.

But then, I'm a Christian - I belong within a certain tradition, just as Cohen belonged in his. The joy for me is that the imagery works, so that without spelling it out I gain an insight into the regrets and compromises that we recognise as we grow old, and claim them as my own. But when I say that, am I asserting the rightness of my interpretation? Am I succeeding in what, to the best of my remembrance, Matthew Arnold demanded - to see the object as in itself it really is? I had to write an essay on this, the first essay set in the Ordinary English Class at Glasgow University in October 1964; I wish I could rewrite it now, when I have so much more to bring to it than the frantic garnering of other people's ideas that my essay amounted to then. But I digress.

What I'm trying to say is this: because I have access to a wide-ranging framework of imagery gained through several decades of worshipping and reading in a Christian context, I feel a resonance with Cohen's song. But if I were to attempt to explain it to a completely non-religious person, someone who has not grown up with the language, someone who has resolutely turned their back on such nebulous superstition, I would find it much harder - or at least, I would have to find another set of metaphors and different imagery to lay out that which I have a shorthand for.

So is all religion, in the end, set out in metaphor? My hero, the poet-priest R.S.Thomas, thought so. In a video clip the interviewer John Osmond asks RS Thomas whether his rôles as poet and priest conflict. No, he replies, because poetry is metaphor, and religion is also metaphor. He sees no conflict between administering the Christian sacraments, which are metaphor, and administering the metaphor of poetry. I have that video somewhere, though for want of a suitable connection to my TV I can no longer play it. But the memory of that interview sticks in my mind, and points to what I now recognise as my own position.

We use language to describe our experience. When we experience something new, we describe it in terms of the familiar, the known. When we continue to experience this, we perhaps change our similes into metaphor - so, God is no longer "like" something else (or like nothing we've ever experienced at all), God "is" something else. And then the attributes of the original something else become God's also, and the metaphor hardens with each accretion. Before you know where you are, God (or any other spiritual experience for which you originally had no words) has become solid, fixed, immutable - and lost something in the process.

I fear I'm drifting into territory where others, much more learned than I, already hold sway. Bear with me, folks - I'm doing this for myself. But the wonderful thing about Leonard Cohen's song - and about many, many more that he wrote in a lifelong pursuit of what he called "blackening pages" - is that he never himself explained what he meant. He left it to us to respond. And that, now that he's gone, is what people are doing in droves.

And this, I offer, is the antithesis of what I hate about organised religion. There is plenty to love, but rigid fundamentalism isn't part of that. Let's hear it for metaphor, and the freedom to respond: I do not care who takes this bloody hill.

St Andrew’s Celebrations – Scots Storytelling⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

small-scots-storytellingJoin us on Tuesday 29th November at 2pm as part of our St Andrew’s Day celebrations for an opportunity to hear Edinburgh’s Makar read from two translated books.

Christine De Luca currently holds the post of Edinburgh’s Makar (poet laureate). She grew up in Walls, Shetland, but has long been resident in Edinburgh. She writes in both English and Shetlandic, her native tongue. She has published six collections of poetry and one novel, and has been the recipient of many awards and prizes for her work. She is one of the founders of Hansel Co-operative Press which was established to promote literary and artistic work in Shetland and Orkney. In 2008 She has translated Roald Dahl’s novel George’s Marvellous Medicine into Shetlandic as Dodie’s Phenomenal Pheesic.

Join us live in Glow TV to her Christina reading ‘The Gruffalo’s Bairn’ and ‘Da Trow’.
Sign up and register to take part live – St Andrew’s Celebrations – Scots Storytelling.

If you unable to join us for the live event you can always catch up with the recording at another time – Glow TV’s Watch Again.

The Cost of Freedom – What is Open?⤴

from @ Open World

Another gem from The Cost of Freedom project, this time by Richard Goodman (@bulgenen), my partner in crime from the ALTC-2016 social media team.  I was chuffed to bits when Rich decided to write something for the project.  You can read his poem What is Open? here.

As part of disquiet Junto Project 0202 Text-to-Speech-to-Free Rich’s poem has also been recorded by Michel Banabila who created this amazingly atmospheric remix.

Links


Never aggregate ephemeral sheep⤴

from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

Liked Fridge Poetry – Google Sheets as Database on Bionic Teaching
Back in 2013 I built a refrigerator poetry page using javascript. I really wanted to make it so anyone could add any words they wanted in some easy way but didn’t have the skills to do that at the time. It’s been hanging out in the back of my mind since then and the bits and pieces I’ve learned since then now make it pretty straightforward.
Liked Fridge Poetry – Google Sheets as Database on Bionic Teaching
Back in 2013 I built a refrigerator poetry page using javascript. I really wanted to make it so anyone could add any words they wanted in some easy way but didn’t have the skills to do that at the time. It’s been hanging out in the back of my mind since then and the bits and pieces I’ve learned since then now make it pretty straightforward.

It is National Poetry Day. When I was in class I always wanted to do something for this, but only occasionally remembered. Although I don’t have a way with words I like working with poetry in the class. I also occasionally like twitter haiku and the like.

I read Tom Woodward’s blog regularly and yesterday I noticed Fridge Poetry – Google Sheets as Database in my RSS reader. Given that I’ve messed about with fridges before 1, I took a look: Google Sheets – Fridge Poetry.

The really interesting thing 2 about this is that Tom has set it up so that it is easy to make another fridge with different sets of words. He even has a link on his post to create a copy of the google spreadsheet to make your own copy (you need a google account, a low entry bar). The sheet itself has the instructions.

Here is one with a selection of words from Scotland small? by Hugh MacDiarmid.

How do you save something like this? Take a screenshot.

What I really love about this idea, besides the sharing of how to do it, it the easy way it can be extended and used with a different set of words.

  1. That was back in 2002 when I was playing with Flash
  2. The other interesting this is the JavaScript and php stuff.

Grid(un)locked-inspiring creative poetry analysis⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

After 18 months in Special Measures and being constantly under scrutiny (a particularly devastating blow to our department – we’d just attained 81% A*-C against a target of 69% when it happened) we’re always looking for new and interesting ways to bring engaging ideas into our classrooms. This idea came about in February as we […]

Projecting Poetry to Prominence⤴

from @ ICT for Teaching & Learning in Falkirk Primary Schools

Words in rhyme are part of literacy around us, whether lyrics of songs, advertising jingles on television or posters, rap or nursery rhymes. And in developing literacy in the curriculum there are opportunities to encourage looking at rhyme.

At different times of the year there are often national or international opportunities to harness the prominence of poetry in its various forms to engage pupils, whether it’s part of national poetry day or month or a local or national festival, or an anniversary celebration of the works of a particular writer in rhyme (such as annual Burns celebrations centred on the life and works of Scotland’s bard Robert Burns).

There is a host of ways of using various free tools to help engage pupils in writing poetry in various forms.

Click here for a variety of ways to use a range of free tools to engage pupils with the poetry of Scotland’s poet Robert Burns - each of the ideas are equally adaptable to be used with poems in other forms and by different writers, poets, rappers or lyricists.

If rap is a style in which some pupils find their outlet for creativity then click here for The Week in Rap which provides examples of how the style of writing can be used to engage in the news of the week while also developing the facility to write in rhyme. Although most of the content is available only by subscription there are free examples which will provide inspiration for pupils to create their own reports in rap.

Getting the chance to hear young people recite poems can often provide the inspiration for others to develop this skill. Click here for the US Poetry Out Loud site to support a poetry recitation competition, with hosts of examples of students reciting poetry of their choice. This site also includes helpful guides and resources to support teachers looking to provide support for pupils in developing recitation skills.

Blabberize provides a free online tool to create an animated image where a pupil can add a mouth which moves at the same time as a recording of the spoken word which the pupil can either record throught eh program itself or upload from a previously made recording. This can be used to bring alive an image of a character or animal from a poem spoekn aloud by a pupil.

Read, Write, Think website has a wide range of activities for supporting literacy, and with many on poetry. Click here for a post about how a variety of these tools can be used during a focus on poetry.

Listen and Write – literacy activities inspired by song – provides a range of free to use online tools which help support a teacher support pupils engage in looking at lyrics of songs. These can be used in different ways, whether looking for the rhymes and how lyrics are put together, to finding ways to inspire pupils to create their own lyrics.

Ode to Poetry – websites to generate student poetry online is a fantastic post by Mrs Smoke which is a collation of a range of online sites which support using poetry in the classroom in many different ways and for different ages and stages of development.

Cybraryman Poetry page is a collection collated in categories by Jerry Blumengarten of tools and resources to support using poetry in the classroom.

Poetry, Poetry, Poetry Symbaloo – is a collection of links, collated by Shannon McClintock Miller, to a variety of online resources to support pupils engaging with poetry, including magnetic words, alliteration creator, rhyme finder, poems in shape forms, acrostic poems and much more.

And if your pupils want to record and share their words in rhyme, online, then click here for free tools to help pupils record, edit and share online their audio recordings.

New Higher English – The Plan So Far…⤴

from @ I've Been Thinking

Post updated 11/03/14 So today I sat down to really plan in detail what a New Higher course for next year might look like, and here is where I am so far: Critical Essay Poetry War Photographer – Carol Ann Duffy (studied at N5) A Last Marriage – Virginia Hamilton Adair Refugee Mother and Child […]