Tag Archives: Ofsted

Education Panorama (July ’14) by @TeacherToolkit⤴

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I’ve decided to bring my monthly newsletter back ‘in-house’ after three months flirting with Tiny Newsletter. It has taken me several months to curate the title for my newsletter. Er, well no. actually, I tell a lie; less than a minute to coin the title, The Educational Panorama, which aims to capture a summary of … Okumaya devam et

#BeyondLessonGrades by @TeacherToolkit and @LeadingLearner⤴

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It may be that 2014 will be seen as a pivotal year in changing how we judge the quality of teaching.  The move from grading individual lessons to viewing teaching, students’ work and progress over time and in a more sophisticated way has only just begun.  If we are serious about having a world-class education … Okumaya devam et

#CreativeTheory in pictures by @TeacherToolkit⤴

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This is what @TeacherToolkit has been up to over the past week and why I continue to support three very important issues in education. During the academic year, especially during the summer term, teachers are released from some of their timetabled teaching commitments and as a result, I am now able to gain some benefit … Okumaya devam et

Defunct? The role of observations at interview by @TeacherToolkit⤴

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I have a bee in my bonnet and a professional-personal dilemma that I’d like to share with my readers. Context: *Disclaimer: This blog is not discussing job descriptions or candidate specifications. It is a challenge regarding the nature of one-off lesson observations used as part of the teacher-interview process for new appointments. It also makes … Okumaya devam et

Hurrah for @OfstedNews! #NoMoreGrades by @TeacherToolkit⤴

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Mike Cladingbowl (@MCladingbowl) realsed this document today (4th June) on the Ofsted website. Brace yourself … “Why I want to try inspecting without grading teaching in each individual lesson.” . Indeed, this is true and is very real! From 9th June 2014, Ofsted is piloting a new approach to the recording of evidence about the … Okumaya devam et

How would you like to be observed? by @TeacherToolkit⤴

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As Ofsted continue to face yet more challenges over the validity of lesson observations, I discuss how best we can develop as teachers and ask the reader, ‘how would you like to be observed?’ Context: An article I wrote was published in The Guardian on 27th May 2014. Disappointingly, I wrote this some time ago … Okumaya devam et

Getting it right: The value of observations by @TeacherToolkit (Part 2/2)⤴

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In April 2014, I raised “The importance of observations and ‘Getting It Right’ (Part 1)” and highlighted the open versus closed process of “Stepping away from observational judgements and how you can evidence this. This would typically be summarised in the following diagram shown below. The closed process is much easier to discuss. We are … Continue reading

A culture of lesson observations by @adam_snell⤴

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Almost three months have now passed since Ofsted announced the ground-breaking news, that inspectors would no longer be grading individual lessons. Except that it wasn’t that ground-breaking. Apparently this had been their instructions since 2009. Who knew? Yet despite this, it is “still possible for inspectors to record a graded evaluation, where sufficient evidence has … Continue reading

How can @OfstedNews win over teachers?⤴

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Ofsted is ‘no longer just disliked, but disdained‘, according to last week’s teacher conferences. This headline (above) was published in The Guardian tabloid today (22.4.14). What changes could Ofsted make to regain teachers’ confidence? It’s the first day back at school today, so I’ve been slightly distracted with childcare (another blog rant) and pending revision … Continue reading

If no one is listening, are you still a teacher? by @TomBarwood⤴

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This post answers the 33rd question from my TeacherToolkit Thinking page of Thunks. Thunk 33: If no one is listening, are you still a teacher? by @TomBarwood If no one is listening, are you still a teacher? My problem is not thinking of thunks, but spending too much time doing the opposite. I seem to … Continue reading