Tag Archives: moving image

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 6 of 17 – Transmedia⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

I really enjoyed Dr Wayne Grant's Presentation on Transmedia Education. Much of the presentation was covered under NDA so I can’t share some of the things that we saw here but I am able to cover some of the more general points.

Firstly, if you unfamiliar with Transmedia Education then you might find this definition from Wikipedia helpful?

“Transmedia Storytelling (also known as transmedia narrative or multiplatform storytelling, cross-media seriality) is the technique of telling a single story or story experience across multiple platforms and formats including, but not limited to, games, books, events, cinema and television.“

I liked this this short animation that was shown at the start of the presentation that shows quite nicely the sorts of things that are now possible within the domain of real-life and digital story telling in a rapidly interconnected world.

 

Wayne was all about engagement (and why wouldn’t he be!) and I liked the model he shared on the stages of student engagement from rebellion through compliance to true (and deep) engagement.

Levels-of-Student-Engagement

I hadn’t really though about stages of engagement linked to student classroom behaviours before and I can see how I might use this as we continue to develop and build on our already successful our self-evaluation procedures at the school.

Wayne also talked about some emerging transmedia elements on the horizon and encouraged us to think about the power of custom software and custom hardware and how much more effective they can be if they are combined. 

To illustrate this we took a sneak preview of a number of quite interesting kickstarter projects such as:

 

 

Linkitz Kickstarter video May 2015 from linkitz on Vimeo.

 

We also looked at some more established products in the context of transmedia education such as:

 

 

 

 

Finally, he also mentioned Project MC2 (a Netflix commissioned original series).

 

Products like Project MC2  are exciting for me as they have very high production values but the learning behind them is also very sound. Kind of reminds me of lots of the work we used to do around commercial off the shelf (COTS) games at the Consolarium. I’ll be checking out MCas soon as I get a chance because the short piece that I saw was very impressive – I also heard that it has been recommissioned for a second season?

With Intel’s acquisition of Kno (now Intel Education Study) in recent times hopefully we will start to see more Transmedia elements built into their software stack?

BTW – if you like the idea of Transmedia Education then do check out Inanimate Alice which is just a first class super product.

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 6 of 17 – Transmedia⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

I really enjoyed Dr Wayne Grant's Presentation on Transmedia Education. Much of the presentation was covered under NDA so I can’t share some of the things that we saw here but I am able to cover some of the more general points.

Firstly, if you unfamiliar with Transmedia Education then you might find this definition from Wikipedia helpful?

“Transmedia Storytelling (also known as transmedia narrative or multiplatform storytelling, cross-media seriality) is the technique of telling a single story or story experience across multiple platforms and formats including, but not limited to, games, books, events, cinema and television.“

I liked this this short animation that was shown at the start of the presentation that shows quite nicely the sorts of things that are now possible within the domain of real-life and digital story telling in a rapidly interconnected world.

 

Wayne was all about engagement (and why wouldn’t he be!) and I liked the model he shared on the stages of student engagement from rebellion through compliance to true (and deep) engagement.

Levels-of-Student-Engagement

I hadn’t really though about stages of engagement linked to student classroom behaviours before and I can see how I might use this as we continue to develop and build on our already successful our self-evaluation procedures at the school.

Wayne also talked about some emerging transmedia elements on the horizon and encouraged us to think about the power of custom software and custom hardware and how much more effective they can be if they are combined. 

To illustrate this we took a sneak preview of a number of quite interesting kickstarter projects such as:

 

 

Linkitz Kickstarter video May 2015 from linkitz on Vimeo.

 

We also looked at some more established products in the context of transmedia education such as:

 

 

 

 

Finally, he also mentioned Project MC2 (a Netflix commissioned original series).

 

Products like Project MC2  are exciting for me as they have very high production values but the learning behind them is also very sound. Kind of reminds me of lots of the work we used to do around commercial off the shelf (COTS) games at the Consolarium. I’ll be checking out MCas soon as I get a chance because the short piece that I saw was very impressive – I also heard that it has been recommissioned for a second season?

With Intel’s acquisition of Kno (now Intel Education Study) in recent times hopefully we will start to see more Transmedia elements built into their software stack?

BTW – if you like the idea of Transmedia Education then do check out Inanimate Alice which is just a first class super product.

Journey Into the Arctic: a YouTube Interactive Mystery⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

Journey into the Arctic

A few years ago a did a presentation / thought piece at Creative Scotland's Media Literacy Conference on Multimodal Learning. At the end of my input I demonstrated (amongst other things) YouTubes capacity to be interactive and to link to other YouTube Videos during or at the end of a video. It was a fairly new feature at the time (back in 2011) and I suggested that it might be nice for schools to use the feature to create some interactive storytelling or multimodal mysteries. 

I still think there is a lot of potential for this but I was reminded of it recently when I saw Canadian Herritage's project titled 'Journey Into the Arctic'.

Journey Into the Arctic is an adventure (set in YouTube) in which you play an explorer on a mission to find the Northwest Passage. Just like a classic mystery book you have to make decisions at the end of each short video (chapter) on how the story unfolds and to help you reach your final goal.

Lots of potential with this - not just as an education resource in its own right but also as an inspiration to create your own YouTube multimodal mysteries stories.

Why good leaders make you feel safe [@tedtalks]⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

 

What makes a great leader? Management theorist Simon Sinek suggests, it’s someone who makes their employees feel secure, who draws staffers into a circle of trust. But creating trust and safety — especially in an uneven economy — means taking on big responsibility.

I enjoyed this. Simple advice, beautifully illustrated with stories. Also, can't help thinking that Local Government offering Scottish Teachers an extra five days (unpaid) holiday a year would sort out the current budget deficit!

NASA Space Sounds free to use on SoundCloud [@nasa @soundcloud]⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

Apollo Soundcloud

Following yesterdays post on the Open Content Toolkit I discovered that NASA has posted a massive library of ‘Space Sounds’ on SoundCloud. You are free to use all of these sounds as you wish, because NASA’s own audio isn’t copyrighted. It is meant to be a public service to the American people of their taxpayer-funded government program, but this ‘fair-use’ extends to everyone globally. They do ask you to list NASA as source, but that’s only reasonable. Read their content guidelines for full details. 

My favourite are the Apollo Sounds which include the classics ‘Eagle Has Landed, ‘Houston, We've Had a Problem and ‘We Have a Lift-Off’. But here are lots of other great sounds as well including rocket sounds, the chirps of satellites and equipment, lightning on Jupiter and interstellar plasma.

In short a great resource library for anyone interested in space, sound and film editing.

Oh, if you like Space Sounds this TED Talk (from 2011) by Artist-technologist Honor Harger is worth a watch (and a listen) as well...