Tag Archives: Microcast

Microcast 8: Thoughts On Sonant Thoughts Ep 29⤴

from @ wwwd – John's World Wide Wall Display

Audio comment on the Microcast Sonant Thoughts – Episode 29: Focused

This is a quick try of an iOS workflow. The idea is to quote and comment on a podcast. The content was a one take job. Steps:

  1. Listen to podcast
  2. Copy URL to audio file (I grabbed it from my RSS reader FeeddlerPro
  3. Open in safari
  4. Save to Dropbox
  5. Open in Ferrite
  6. Trim to quote
  7. Add audio comment
  8. Save to iCloud
  9. Back in Safari upload to blog, create post etc

Could probably speed things up using workflow to create post.

Id love to see an app to simplify this. I don’t think it is really a practical solution. Much quicker to move to desktop.

Microcast 5: Choices⤴

from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

IMG_7438.jpeg

Some thoughts about making choices about the software and systems you use, they may have hidden positives or negatives.

Featured image, iPhone screenshot, edited in snapseed

    Microcast 3: Whose blog is it anyway?⤴

    from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

    IMG_0080.jpeg

    Last week I attended the morning of the Always on (them) event at the University of the West of Scotland. This was organised by Professor David McGillivary. It looked at Digital and Social Media use in Education.

    Last week I posted a brief summary of my talk and links to the audio I recorded for EDUtalk.

    I ended my talk with a few questions that I though were worth thinking about. This is the first of a few microcasts doing just that.

    Here a three questions I think go together:

    • Are we getting the best out of Social Media?
    • Should pupils be more involved in posting?
    • Do we read others productions or are we using SM mainly as a broadcast?

    These are the easiest questions to start with. They come from the recent rapid expansion in the number of schools blogging and using Twitter across Scotland. I am comparing it to how I though blogging was going to go when I was actively involved in classroom blogging with pupils from 2004 till 2008.

    At that time I primarily though about blogging as an activity for pupils. I also tried to get my pupils reading some other pupil blogs, doing a wee bit of commenting, occasionally blogging in reaction and the like. This was quite time consuming. It did lead to some interesting experiences.

    We did not perceive much of an impact on our local community or even parents. Only getting engagement online for parents when we went away for week long school trips.

    Reading class and school blogs more recently I get the impression that they are more targeted at local community and parents and are largely authored by staff.

    A couple of days before the event I tried to see if I could gets some numbers to back up this impression.

    Glow blogs consists of 33 instance of WordPress one for each Local Authority and one central. Each has a home page listing up to 40 of the most recently updated public blogs.

    I did a bit of scripting to:

    • Scrape a list of urls from each LA page (1212 blogs)
    • Download the RSS feed latest posts from each of these blogs (9002 posts)
    • get the authors for all of these posts.

    From that I could guess that users that were Mr, Ms, Mrs, Miss, Dr and the like were adults, there are a few who use their glow usernames which I discarded and some who have initial second name who I presume are adults. Finally I removed a few familiar faces who I know are not pupils.
    This left me with 15% of posts that could have been posted by pupils. I suspect it is even lower as some teachers use their full name as their display name on Glow Blogs.

    This is quite different that the figure I would have guessed 10 years ago. At that point I though blogging would have become a place for pupils to share their learning and gain audience and for teachers to post for professional development. It looks like we are using blogs more to broadcast to parents and community.

    I’d be really interested in finding out about school use of Twitter in a similar fashion. It appears to me that most of the tweets are coming from teachers. I wonder if there is discussion of what is tweeted with pupils, if classes look at other schools tweets. How much engagement between classes and learners is going on? Is Twitter part of learning or is it mostly used by schools to showcase that learning?

    In both blogging and tweeting is the idea of more pupil voice a good one? Is it too complex to manage? Is there anything to be gained by engaging with other classes and groups of learners?

    I have always presumed that these were good ideas. They don’t seem to have gained the popularity I expected.

    I seem to have ended up with even more questions than I started with. Given it looks like I’ll be teaching in school next session I am looking forward to testing some of these things out in reality.

    featured image: Portable shortwave transmitter | Flickr – Photo Sharing! used under a Creative Commons — Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic — CC BY-NC 2.0 licenses.

    Microcast 2: Webmention ping-pong⤴

    from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

    miners-playing-ping-pong

    So microcast 2 comes hot on the heels of number one. A few interesting things came out of the first one. Most excitingly I got a webmention from Henrik Carlsson’s Blog. He had produced a microcast in response to mine.

    This is the indieweb equivalent of a reply on Anchor held together by webmentions. My microcast sent a webmention to Henrik’s post, his ‘reply’ sends a webmention to my post and this post will send one back. This is really sweet. It parallels the anchor experience, be we own our own spaces and data.

    I wonder if webmentions could be extended to include links to enclosures, that could gather the audio players together on all the sites involved in the one place.

    The next nice thing was that Henrik mentioned he has an opml file of microcasts. I had a look at my RSS reader, Inoreader, and saw it suports OPML subscriptions. That means I subscribe to the OPML feed which subscribes me to the different RSS feeds that make up the file. When Henrik adds a feed to his OPML feed, that feed gets added to my feeds in inoreader. This now becomes the equivalent of a mini Anchor.

    All this cheers me up considerably especially as I’ve read a few posts recently about the move to podcasting getting more locked down and controlled.

    The featured image on this post is Miners playing ping pong in Queensland, ca. 1890 from flickr, No known copyright restrictions.

    An indie wave for @joedale⤴

    from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

    Image-4.jpeg

    This is a microcast, it is microcast number 1 here.

    There is a few thinks rattling around my head that I think link up.

    They were prompted bya tweet from Joe Dale this morning. I was eating breakfast when Joe tweeted that anchor, the podcasting app had some new features. One was particularly cool. Anchor allows you to reply to an audio wave with one of your own. The latest version of the app allows you to export a conversation as an audio file. This lends itself to asynchronous podcast creation.

    I listened and responded to Joe’s anchor musing on the workflow he had described and about anchor from a sort of, fairly ignorant, indieweb perspective.

    We waved back and forth a bit and Joe asked for more thoughts on indieweb. This is it.

    The link to the idea of workflow comes from a post I made here about how to post audio to WordPress using the iOS app using Workflow. That post got a webmention from Henrik Carlsson’s blog. That is were I first heard the word microcast. He has an indieweb blog and webmentions are sort of indieweb trackbacks/ping back.

    There are some basic indieweb ideas:

    • Your content is yours When you post something on the web, it should belong to you, not a corporation. Too many companies have gone out of business and lost all of their users’ data. By joining the IndieWeb, your content stays yours and in your control.
    • You are better connected Your articles and status messages can go to all services, not just one, allowing you to engage with everyone. Even replies and likes on other services can come back to your site so they’re all in one place.
    • You are in control You can post anything you want, in any format you want, with no one monitoring you. In addition, you share simple readable links such as example.com/ideas. These links are permanent and will always work.

    from: IndieWebCamp

    I guess the indieweb idea is the opposite, in some ways, of posting to a silo like Facebook or Anchor. These silos have their own affordances. They are easy to set up, often free and make things like having a conversation easy. To reply to Joe this morning all I had to do was click the reply button in the anchor app and talk. For Joe to reply to this he would have to post audio on a service that could send a trackback or webmention to this post. Listeners would have to follow links to hear the conversation.

    On the other hand Anchor has a degree of lock-in. There is currently no RSS Feed for my waves. I can export them which is great but I can’t grab, as far as I know, all my content. I have to rely ontThe service staying around.

    With this microcast I own the data, it is hosted at my own expense in my own space. It can be possed out. POSSE is an abbreviation for Publish (on your) Own Site, Syndicate Elsewhere, is an indieweb principal.

    A lot of the indieweb stuff is a little to technical for me but I think it is pointing to something important. Even if we use services like Facebook and anchor we should know what we are doing, what we gain and what we give up. A great post around the same space which is a lot easier to digest that the indiewebcamp is Doug Belshaw’s Working openly on the web: a manifesto.