Tag Archives: literacy

Fake, Fiction or Fact? How can learners be helped to work out what’s true?⤴

from @ ICT for Teaching & Learning in Falkirk Primary Schools

There are so many choices for sources of news for learners to find out about what’s going on the world today, whether printed media, online news sites or social media. But how can learners be helped to be able to work out if what they are reading has any substance in fact, how accurate the information is, or what the biases are likely to be?

How can you spot fake news?

howtospotfakenewsinfographicHow to Spot Fake News – the IFLA (the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions), with thanks to www.factcheck.org, created an infographic detailing steps we can all take when trying to work out if what we are reading, hearing or watching is verifiable. This helps teach the skills of critical thinking and media literacy. This describes with visual representation 8 steps to take to help determine the likely authenticity of shared information: to consider the source, to read beyond the headline, the check credibility of the author, to look at linking sources, to check the date to see if current, to research to see if it’s satire, to consider your own biases and the likely ones of the source sharing the information, and to consult fact-checking sites. The infographic is available to download as either an image or in pdf format for printing.

takkfakenewsliteracy

Digital Literacy and “Fake News” – Resources to Help you help your students – many links collated by librarian-turned-technology-specialist Nancy Watson @nancywtech which help teachers guide their learners through ways to spot fake news and techniques to work out the authenticity of the shared information. The links include sites aimed at different age groups, teachers, younger learners, as well as for general public use. They include fact-checking sites as well as tips and advice to determining reliability of what is shared.

nwfakenewsepidemicDigital Literacy and the “Fake News” EpidemicNancy Watson has produced a superb resource for educators sharing a host of advice, tips and resources to support teachers support their learners to better be able to be discerning about the information shared online or in the print media. This includes examples of fake news and outlines the steps anyone can take to determine it to be factually inaccurate.

nprfakeorrealFake or real? How to self-check the news and get the facts – a post by digital news intern Wynne Davis describing the issue of fake news and giving practical advice for all ages about how to help determine whether what you are reading is true or fiction. Tips include checking the domain name (especially similar-sounding names), looking at quotations in the story (and checking up on who they are and anything known about them online), searching the quote itself to see if it properly attributed or taken out of context, check the comments to get a flavour of whether others call out the facts as being untrue and cite sources to back up their claims, reverse image search (right click on an image online and choose to search Google for it to see where else it is used and the context in which it is used).

Internet Archive and Wayback Machine

internetarchiveWouldn’t it be great if, when someone says content has changed on a website, or disappeared completely, that there was a way to look back at what was there beforehand? Well, The Internet Archive saves a huge amount of online content from many sources around the web (several hundred billion webpages!). This relies on the Wayback Machine (which is part of the Internet Archive) trawling on a regular basis for changed content. So if you search for a website and it is no longer available you can pop the weblink into the Wayback Machine (which is part of The Internet Archive) and look back at previous versions just by choosing a specific date. It will only be available for dates on which a trawl was made so is not available for every date but it’s still very impressive to be able to look at a website change over time and to be able to compare and contrast with versions over time.

savepagenowCan you save a web page on Wayback machine so it’s always there for future reference? Yes you can! You can simply capture a web page as it appears now for future use as a trusted citation in the future, or just to ensure it does not disappear when the original website changes or disappears. All you do is paste the weblink when you first find it on the Save Page Now” part of the Internet Archive site.

Fact-checking sites

There are a number of sites which can be used to verify whether stories (particularly those which appear on social media and spread like wildfire) have any basis in fact or whether they are urban myths, or out and out lies or propaganda. These include Politifact, Snopes, and Factcheck.org

Do you think you read with your bias? What bias does the writer have?

biasesaffectingusallBiases which affect us all – an infographic created by Business Insider which lists and describes 20 biases which we can all have when we read, hear or share information. Whether it’s a tendency to have a reliance on the first piece of information we hear, whether we are influenced by hearing the same information shared by a group, whether the information confirms what we already believed, stereotyping, or information which implies cause and effect, or many more – this infographic provides a useful starting point for discussing with learners the range of influences on us all when we all read or hear information.

 

Financial Education – powerful messages and memorable experiences⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Much has been done over the past ten years or so to improve the quality and quantity of the financial education delivered in our schools. This has been achieved by working across the financial, education and cultural sectors to raise the status and profile of financial education but also to improve the confidence of teachers to address the issues in this area of the curriculum.  The main reasons for a continued focus on financial education are the ever changing economic, political, social and environmental issues that continue to have a wide-ranging impact on all our lives.  These contexts are a central feature of  ‘learning for sustainability’ . Financial education has an important role in tackling poverty, reducing financial and social exclusion and improving the employability skills of all our young people. This will benefit both the individual and society in general.

Financial education is about helping young people meet the financial and economic challenges, now and particularly in ‘post-Brexit Britain’. The best way to do this to make sure they receive powerful messages about money and their experiences in and out of the classroom are memorable. Economics, politics and philosophy are at the heart of the development of financial capability underpinned by numeracy and literacy skills. It should be recognised that developing financial skills will make a contribution to an individual’s economic wellbeing which in turn improves physical, mental, emotional and social wellbeing.   Issues such as

  • High levels of personal debt (including student debt)
  • Increasingly sophisticated financial products
  • Pay day and other high cost lending
  • ‘Food banks’ and increasing levels of poverty
  • High pressure advertising particularly around gambling
  • Pension regulation
  • Probable increase and fluctuations in interest rates
  • Changes to taxes and benefits

mean that there is an even greater need for individuals to take a much more active and informed interest in their own financial futures. Low levels of financial capability can be a cause and a symptom of poverty with the resulting impact on all aspects of health and wellbeing. It is really important that schools work with a range of stakeholders including credit unions to improve the financial skills of our young people.

Financial Education – powerful messages and memorable experiences⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Much has been done over the past ten years or so to improve the quality and quantity of the financial education delivered in our schools. This has been achieved by working across the financial, education and cultural sectors to raise the status and profile of financial education but also to improve the confidence of teachers to address the issues in this area of the curriculum.  The main reasons for a continued focus on financial education are the ever changing economic, political, social and environmental issues that continue to have a wide-ranging impact on all our lives.  These contexts are a central feature of  ‘learning for sustainability’ . Financial education has an important role in tackling poverty, reducing financial and social exclusion and improving the employability skills of all our young people. This will benefit both the individual and society in general.

Financial education is about helping young people meet the financial and economic challenges, now and particularly in ‘post-Brexit Britain’. The best way to do this to make sure they receive powerful messages about money and their experiences in and out of the classroom are memorable. Economics, politics and philosophy are at the heart of the development of financial capability underpinned by numeracy and literacy skills. It should be recognised that developing financial skills will make a contribution to an individual’s economic wellbeing which in turn improves physical, mental, emotional and social wellbeing.   Issues such as

  • High levels of personal debt (including student debt)
  • Increasingly sophisticated financial products
  • Pay day and other high cost lending
  • ‘Food banks’ and increasing levels of poverty
  • High pressure advertising particularly around gambling
  • Pension regulation
  • Probable increase and fluctuations in interest rates
  • Changes to taxes and benefits

mean that there is an even greater need for individuals to take a much more active and informed interest in their own financial futures. Low levels of financial capability can be a cause and a symptom of poverty with the resulting impact on all aspects of health and wellbeing. It is really important that schools work with a range of stakeholders including credit unions to improve the financial skills of our young people.

Developing Gaelic literacy skills⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Tuesday 7th February, Balnain House, Inverness; 09.15  – 17.00 Tutor: Roddy MacLean

Are you interested in developing your skills in editing and proof-reading Gaelic texts?  If so, this professional learning opportunity may be of interest to you.  It includes a focus on grammar and writing conventions.  For more information, or to register for the course, email John Storey, at the Gaelic Books Council.

Sgilean Sgrìobhaidh is Deasachaidh Gàidhlig airson nan Gnìomhachasan Cruthachail

Dimàirt 7 an Gearran, Balnain House, Inbhir Nis. 09.15 – 17.00 Neach-teagaisg: Ruairidh MacIlleathain

A bheil ùidh agad ann an obair-deasachaidh ceangailte ri leabhraichean no foillseachaidhean eile?  Ma tha, ‘s dòcha gum bi ùidh agad anns a’ chùrsa ùr seo.  Airson tuilleadh fiosrachaidh, no airson clàradh, cuiribh brath gu John Storey, Ceannard Litreachais agus Foillseachaidh.

St Andrew’s Celebrations – Scots Storytelling⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

small-scots-storytellingJoin us on Tuesday 29th November at 2pm as part of our St Andrew’s Day celebrations for an opportunity to hear Edinburgh’s Makar read from two translated books.

Christine De Luca currently holds the post of Edinburgh’s Makar (poet laureate). She grew up in Walls, Shetland, but has long been resident in Edinburgh. She writes in both English and Shetlandic, her native tongue. She has published six collections of poetry and one novel, and has been the recipient of many awards and prizes for her work. She is one of the founders of Hansel Co-operative Press which was established to promote literary and artistic work in Shetland and Orkney. In 2008 She has translated Roald Dahl’s novel George’s Marvellous Medicine into Shetlandic as Dodie’s Phenomenal Pheesic.

Join us live in Glow TV to her Christina reading ‘The Gruffalo’s Bairn’ and ‘Da Trow’.
Sign up and register to take part live – St Andrew’s Celebrations – Scots Storytelling.

If you unable to join us for the live event you can always catch up with the recording at another time – Glow TV’s Watch Again.

Using stories to support numeracy – Collette Collects – a picture book for number bonds…⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

It is always good to have a bit of a project for the school holidays. My October holiday project probably should have been having a big tidy-up or finding someone to clean the guttering, but instead I decided to finish writing and illustrating a picture book. This was quite a significant project as I am […]

Using stories to support numeracy – Collette Collects – a picture book for number bonds…⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

It is always good to have a bit of a project for the school holidays. My October holiday project probably should have been having a big tidy-up or finding someone to clean the guttering, but instead I decided to finish writing and illustrating a picture book. This was quite a significant project as I am […]

Scots in Shawlands⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

By Adam Black

wp_20160607_12_05_28_pro

“We at Shawlands decided that it would be nice for our Primary Two classes to learn a little about Scots language. On discussing this with the children they seemed very upbeat and interested. We decided to start off our learning process by teaching some classic Scottish songs (Skyscraper Wean/Cannae Shove yer Grannie Aff a Bus etc) and by reading ‘The Gruffalo’ in Scots. This worked well and the children were hooked!

We decided to create Scots language dictionaries where the children copy down a Scots word and write what they think it means before writing down the true translation. This created lots of hilarity in the class.

We then thought it would be good to seek a talk form a professional. The children love receiving visitors and when I contacted the Education Scotland Scots language team they were prompt and pleasant in their reply. We very quickly set up a date for Bruce Eunson to come in and speak to the children. Bruce had a lovely manner with the children and they were captivated from start to finish. They really enjoyed his use of Scots and the game he played with the red balls was one they adored (I also liked it and will steal it for my own literacy work!).

Bruce also introduced us to the NLS Oor Wullie Scots website. This is a fantastic resource which we wouldn’t have found ourselves. It has interesting activities which are easy to use. It has also captured the children’s imagination as several children have come into school with Oor Wullie annuals.

Overall we are delighted that we chose to look at Scots. The children are really benefiting from learning a little about their cultural history and are enjoying throwing the occasional Scots word into lessons. They loved meeting Bruce and practising with Oor Wullie. A enjoyable experience for all and one we will use with our classes for years to come!”

wp_20160607_12_06_29_pro

They need subtitles, don’t they? A PedagooMuckle learning conversation⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

Short films are brilliant contributions to literacy-rich classrooms. Combining storytelling, culture, creativity and tech all in one fabulous package, a short film is a carefully constructed text that can engage learners in the most unexpected ways. And some aren’t even in English! In this conversation we shared experiences and ideas for watching and making short […]

They need subtitles, don’t they? A PedagooMuckle learning conversation⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

Short films are brilliant contributions to literacy-rich classrooms. Combining storytelling, culture, creativity and tech all in one fabulous package, a short film is a carefully constructed text that can engage learners in the most unexpected ways. And some aren’t even in English! In this conversation we shared experiences and ideas for watching and making short […]