Tag Archives: literacy

Resources to support health and wellbeing in Gaelic Medium Education (GME)⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The Safer Scotland Scottish Government website has resources to support children learning through the medium of Gaelic. These include interactive games and stories.  Please visit:

http://gaelic.gosafewithziggy.com/

Road Safety – ‘Go Safe with Ziggy’ Competition

Ziggy’s BIG competition is about helping children learn about road safety in a fun, creative way.  This is part of a Scotland-wide movement to help young children be safe on roads and about traffic. The competition is open until the end of April 2018.

Scots language creative writing competition – winners announced⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

To celebrate the Year of History, Heritage and Archaeology, Education Scotland organised a Scots language creative writing competition inviting pupils to write a poem or short story in Scots.

We received a great selection of entries from across Scotland and we’re delighted to announce the winners:

  • Tris Davidson – Comely Park Primary School, Falkirk
  • Eliot Wearden – Biggar High School, South Lanarkshire
  • Mackenzie Reilly – Airdrie Academy, North Lanarkshire
  • Sarah Green – Keith Grammar School, Moray

The winning entries were all chosen for their excellent use of Scots vocabulary as well as demonstrating the skills and commitment required to write in Scots. They also showed creativity through the range of subject matters, from space fiction to the Loch Ness Monster and the adventures of Pickles the cat.

Having received such a high standard of entries, four runners-up have also been selected for their creativity and dedication to writing in Scots. The runners-up are:

  • Euan Hendry – Comely Park Primary School, Falkirk
  • Eilidh McAllan – Biggar High School, South Lanarkshire
  • Eilidh Currie, Eilidh McDermid and Rachel Thom – Airdrie Academy, North Lanarkshire
  • Lewis Rodgers and Kirsty Duncan – Keith Grammar School, Moray

The winner and runners-up will receive a great selection of Scots language books for their schools.

A special commendation for creativity and imagination has also been awarded to Eva Kerr from Airdrie Academy. Eva not only wrote a poem about the Kelpies but she also created a great animation

Thank you to everyone who took part in the competition. For more information about Scots language visit the Scots Blether on Glow.

Everything in moderation⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

A blog by Jamie Farquhar
Deputy Head Teacher of Dumfries Academy

Jamie Farquhar
Deputy Head Teacher of Dumfries Academy

I am a QAMSO.

Increasingly – in the second year of there being QAMSOs – colleagues know what that is. Good; it saves me unpacking the acronym to its full glory of Quality Assurance and Moderation Support Officer and it suggests we* are having an impact.

My role is to support colleagues in their understanding and application of Moderation in its widest sense through the lens of a particular Numeracy or Literacy level. In my case, this is Third Level Writing.

I am not an English Teacher. However, I am a passionate advocate for the Teaching Profession and of the Responsibilities of All as key priorities for our learners. I believe the Broad General Education (BGE) provides the platform for teachers to co-create a curriculum that meets the needs of individual learners, in individual schools.

To achieve this we need the confidence to spurn the false panacea of centrally distributed WAGOLLs (What a Good One Looks Like) and resist ‘mimetic isomorphism’. In other words; it’s not about teachers doing the same thing, in the same way, either through decree or by the copycatting of perceived eminence. Rather, we should aim for the contextualised consistency of quality; as a QAMSO I advocate achieving this through planning, professional dialogue, reflection, sharing, experimentation and evaluation i.e. through Moderation.

Moderation is about skilled professionals working together to plan, evaluate, feedback and feed forward learning to all learning partners. Moderation is groups of teachers subjecting the entire learning process to rigorous professional scrutiny and so trusting and being trusted in their judgements. Through collaboration we empower a move beyond consistency of practice to an increased confidence in individual judgements, planning and interventions.

The Moderation Cycle provides a framework through which to embark on this process. In my own school, we accessed the cycle through the Evaluation stage by leading engagement with the Literacy Benchmarks and developing professional confidence in making judgements of CfE-levels. This starting point was chosen due to a familiarity, within a secondary context, of judging work against set standards in the Senior Phase. The challenge is to move thinking and practice from summative evaluation of output to include moderated planning of input; to ensure we are teaching and supporting what we later assess.

We have begun. Our Literacy Strategy produced Evidence which, as well as debate over CfE-levels, led to dialogue about the evidence’s relevance and validity. This demanded we reflect on our Assessment tools; which asked questions about the effectiveness of our Learning and Teaching and learners’ understanding of what they were learning and how well they had learned it (Learning Intentions and Success Criteria).

Colleagues then began to revisit their planning (Es and Os) to reflect learning and the Learner more holistically. This provided a range of on-going and holistic Evidence which demonstrated strengths, successes and nextsteps which informed Feedback, Reporting and planning of the next learning experience and so on. The principles of the Moderation Cycle as applied to Literacy have started to impact on practice in other curriculum areas and beyond the BGE.

The Moderation Hub provides an incredible resource to support this work. I will use it extensively in my QAMSO role to support Professional Learning in schools. The Hub provides off-the-shelf material for Professional Learning Workshops and e-learning. I recommend it to all Literacy / Numeracy Leads and Professional Learning Coordinators. I also commend the Moderation Cycle and Hub to all school leaders as a means to lead and evidence genuine Quality Assurance of Learning and Teaching.

The workshops take a little time as they work through each stage of the cycle, asking colleagues to reflect on examples and craft improvements collaboratively. A commitment to mutual engagement and knowledge creation through the Moderation Cycle should lead to a sustained shift of culture and improvement in outcomes for learners that simply being ‘given the answers’ cannot hope to achieve.

The Moderation Cycle provides the framework to be autonomous, contextually-aware, professional leaders of learning.
This QAMSO’s advice: Follow the Cycle – Co-Create – Trust your Judgements.

*There are lots of us: Each Local Authority has a QAMSO for each CfE Level from Early to Fourth in Numeracy, Writing and Reading.

Case Study: Increasing the uptake for languages in the senior phase⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Scotland’s National Centre for Languages (SCILT) has published a case study which focuses on increasing the uptake for languages as young people move from the broad general education into the senior phase.   It demonstrates how self-evaluation has been used to secure improvements.

The case study is available here:

https://www.scilt.org.uk/Portals/24/Library/news/2017/St%20Thomas%20Aquinas%20Secondary%20School%20Case%20Study.pdf?ver=2017-11-17-162149-840

To use a similar approach for Gàidhlig and learning through the medium of Gaelic, please consider using the following:

How good is our school? (fourth edition)

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/frwk2hgios

Section 2 of the statutory Guidance on Gaelic Education

http://www.gaidhlig.scot/bord/education/statutory-guidance/

Advice on Gaelic Education: Secondary stages (Gaelic Medium Education)

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/Documents/Gael3-9secondarystages.pdf

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/Documents/Gael3-9rean%c3%a1rdsgoile.pdf

Quality and Improvement in Scottish Education: Gaelic Medium Education

https://education.gov.scot/Documents/QuISEGaelic%20Medium%20Education.pdf

Gaelic Medium Education: self-improvement, attainment and leadership

https://blogs.glowscotland.org.uk/glowblogs/eslb/2017/06/08/gaelic-medium-education-self-improvement-attainment-and-leadership/

 

Comhairle nan Leabhraichean Bileag Ùr do Phàrantan⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Tha Comhairle nan Leabhraichean air bileag ùr a chruthachadh do phàrantan aig nach eil Gàidhlig, aig a bheil clann ann am foghlam tro mheadhan na Gàidhlig. Tha molaidhean agus fiosrachadh ann mu dheidhinn leabhraichean agus goireasan a tha rim faighinn airson diofar aoisean, bho phàistean gu inbhich òga. Cuiribh fios Shelagh is cuiridh iad pasgan dhan sgoil.

The Gaelic Books Council has produced a new leaflet for non-Gaelic speaking parents of children in Gaelic Medium Education. It contains information and advice about books and resources for all ages. Please contact Shelagh for more information.

Reader View – easier to see, read or hear.⤴

from @ Alan Stewart's AT Blog

Webpages can be very messy places to read from: broken or wandering text – often split at odd paces to accommodate a picture or advert, font sizes that are too small and shapes not really considerate to those with reading difficulties.

The Safari browser for Mac/iPad/iPhone has had Reader View built in for quite some time allowing users to strip the extraneous stuff out of the page leaving clean, plain text which can also be sized and have its font and background settings changed.http://www.iphonefaq.org/archives/974045

There’s an extension for Google Chrome that does, virtually, the same thing – it’s called Reader View and you can download it/install it to your Chrome browser here.

The extension looks like this when your browser is on most front/home pages that are links rather than text-based articles.reader view index

The extension icon changes when Reader View is available (text-based articles). reader view text

When the icon is clicked the page will change from a standard page to a clear, stripped down Reader View with font size, shape, and background colour/themes available down the right-hand side of the page.

This is the type of extension that should be made available for all pupils who have dyslexia, visual impairments, or any difficulty with reading that might be helped by seeing cleaner, clearer, more appropriately sized text. Using text-to-speech support software is also often easier to utilise with text that is spaced out in this way.


Filed under: Accessibility, Assistive Technology Software, Chrome, Cross curricular, ICT Support, iPad, Literacy, Personal, Teaching & Learning

Maths Apps – Manipulatives & More in Chrome & iPad⤴

from @ Alan Stewart's AT Blog

As more and more of our pupils are supplied with devices on a 1:1 footing it starts to make use of the tools in everyday learning more possible. I think it would be fair to say that most digital mathematical experiences for pupils in primary schools have tended towards games and content-filled puzzle websites rather than tools to help them visualise and manipulate during their actual maths lessons.

With more resources at hand, pupils can now be given the chance to use digital numberlines, number frames, manipulatives to help with numbers, fractions, and patterns, and use geoboards – without elastic bands!

This set of tools (available for both Chrome & iPad) from Clarity Innovations would be a great place to start connecting maths teaching & learning with digital resources more directly.

Learn more and download your apps here.

They work brilliantly on your IWBs too for teaching and demonstration.

 

 


Filed under: Assistive Technology Software, Chrome, Inclusion, IWB, Literacy, Numeracy, Teaching & Learning

The Story of Me – increasing vocabulary recognition.⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

I am a primary school class teacher, based in Scotland. I teach Primary 2 (age 6 -7 years). I designed the Story of Me project to promote recall of vocabulary. It was inspired by an article I read recently by Turk et Al (2015) which found that children were more likely to recall target vocabulary if it […]