Tag Archives: Literacy and Gàidhlig

Professional learning to support Gaelic Medium Education, Scottish Learning Festival, 20 and 21 September 2017⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Following on from the successful conference, Transitions to Secondary we are pleased to announce two further opportunities to support the development of the secondary GME curriculum.

The Scottish Learning Festival (SLF) is Scotland’s key educational event. We look forward to inviting you to a seminar for Gaelic Medium Education (GME) at 9.30am on Wednesday 20 September.  This will have a focus on promoting excellence and equity for learners through an improved GME curriculum.  We are delighted to invite Angus MacLennan, the headteacher of e-Sgoil, to co-present with us.  Angus will share how e-Sgoil has been using technology to deliver different aspects of the curriculum to schools throughout Scotland.  This seminar will be of interest to senior managers, teachers and curriculum partners.  Registration for SLF 2017 is still open.

Following on from the SLF, we will provide professional learning at An t-Alltan to support the delivery of the secondary GME curriculum. E-Sgoil will co-present with us.  This session will give practitioners an opportunity to become familiar with the digital technology that is used by e-Sgoil while promoting effective pedagogy.  Registration for An t-Alltan is now open.  Please visit,  www.storlann.co.uk/an-t-alltan.

Please also refer to our Advice on Gaelic Education, some of which is statutory, on how to structure and design a curriculum for GME.

An t-Alltan/ Conference for Practitioners of Gaelic Education, 27 and 28 September 2017⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Practitioners are invited to register for this conference that is organised by Stòrlann. Education Scotland is delivering workshops at the conference to which you are warmly invited.  Please visit www.storlann.co.uk/an-t-alltan to register.

The workshops we are delivering at the conference are:

  1. Achieving Excellence and Equity

This session will look at how our report, Quality and Improvement in Scottish Education, 2012-2016 can support self-evaluation for self-improvement.  The session will comprise presentation and discussion to include:

  • effective leadership of 3-18 Gaelic in schools and nurseries;
  • using a well-structured and designed curriculum to raise attainment;
  • immersion, interaction and high-quality pedagogy through play;
  • using assessment to inform progress and attainment;
  • creating schools and nurseries which have a mutual understanding and inclusive ethos for Gaelic.
  1. E-Sgoil: A digital solution for Gaelic Medium Education curriculum

We are delighted to invite e-Sgoil to co-present this workshop with us. The development of an effective secondary GME curriculum requires creative planning of the contexts of Curriculum for Excellence. E-Sgoil offers a digital learning solution for curriculum planners’ consideration.  In this session, practitioners will gain an insight into what it is like to be a teacher, facilitator and a learner in e-Sgoil.  The session will support practitioners of the 3-18 curriculum to

  • become familiar with the digital technology that is used by e-Sgoil;
  • focus on effective pedagogy to support learning through technology;
  • plan the primary curriculum to support transitions to learning which is partially delivered through digital technologies.

Please also refer to our Advice on Gaelic Education, some of which is statutory, on how to structure and design a curriculum for GME.

  1. Benchmarks for Literacy and Gàidhlig

The purpose of this session is to promote an understanding of the national standards described in the Benchmarks for Literacy and Gàidhlig. There will be a particular focus on listening and talking.

Key themes for presentation and discussion will include:

  • using the Benchmarks to support professional judgements of achievement of a level;
  • developing progression in literacy and Gàidhlig using the Benchmarks;
  • gathering a range of evidence to demonstrate breadth, challenge and application;
  • developing an effective cycle of moderation in which practitioners have a shared understanding of standards and expectations.

Please register for these workshops at www.storlann.co.uk/an-t-alltan.

Slatan-tomhais Slàinte agus sunnd/Health and wellbeing Benchmarks⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Tha na Slatan-tomhais airson Slàinte agus sunnd a nis ri fhaighinn ann an Gàidhlig aig:

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/Pages/Curriculum-for-Excellence-Benchmarks-.aspx

 

The Gaelic version of the Benchmarks for Health and wellbeing are now available at: 

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/Pages/Curriculum-for-Excellence-Benchmarks-.aspx

 

Slatan-tomhais Litearrachd is Gàidhlig / Literacy and Gàidhlig Benchmarks⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Tha na Slatan-tomhais litearrachd is Gàidhlig a nis ri fhaighinn ann an Gàidhlig aig:

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/Pages/Curriculum-for-Excellence-Benchmarks-.aspx

The Gaelic version of the Benchmarks for literacy and Gàidhlig are now available at:

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/Pages/Curriculum-for-Excellence-Benchmarks-.aspx

 

How good is our early learning and childcare?⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Tha “Dè cho math ’s a tha ar tràth-ionnsachadh agus ar cùram-chloinne?”  a nis ri fhaighinn ann an Gàidhlig aig:

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/Pages/frwk1hgioearlyyears.aspx

The Gaelic version of “How good is our early learning and childcare?” is now available at:

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/Pages/frwk1hgioearlyyears.aspx

 

How good is our third sector organisation?⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Tha “Dè cho math ‘s a tha ar buidheann treas earrainn?” a nis ri fhaighinn ann an Gàidhlig aig:

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/frwk3hgiothirdsector

The Gaelic version of “How good is our third sector organisation?” is now available at:

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/frwk3hgiothirdsector

 

Edinburgh International Book Festival⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Baillie Gifford Schools Programme – 21-29 August 2017

What’s the Big Idea?
The 2017 Edinburgh International Book Festival Baillie Gifford Schools Programme challenges young minds to question, imagine and wonder. The programme brings together well-established writers, illustrators and performers from every corner of the globe, along with some shining new talent.
The programme is full of activities that will entertain, educate, enthral and inspire everyone from P1 pupils to teens and teachers, including events with bestselling illustrator Kristina Stephenson, Olympic cyclist Chris Hoy, picture book events for the youngest primary school pupils, and a Relaxed Event for pupils with Additional Support Needs.
You can find more information, download the full programme and book tickets on the Book Festival’s new Learning Site: learning.edbookfest.co.uk

E-Sgoil: A digital solution for Gaelic Medium Education Scottish Learning Festival: Wednesday 20 September⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

E-Sgoil offers schools a digital learning solution to increase the breadth of programmes and pathways on offer to young people as part of Curriculum for Excellence.  You are invited to a seminar at the Scottish Learning Festival at which Angus MacLennan, Headteacher of e-Sgoil will share an evaluation of some primary and secondary pilots that e-Sgoil ran in their first year.   Advice will also be available on how e-Sgoil can increase learning through the medium of Gaelic at the secondary stages. Information on how to register for this seminar, and the festival programme, are available here.

Gaelic Medium Education – self-improvement, attainment and leadership⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

By Joan Esson, HM Inspector and Lead Officer for inspection of Gaelic Medium Education

The recently published report, ‘Quality and Improvement in Scottish Education 2012-2016’ (QuISE) highlighted a number of key areas of strengths and aspects for improvement from 3-18 Gaelic Medium Education (GME) inspections. You can read the chapter relating to GME on our website.

It was a great privilege to review our inspection findings for GME and evidence how the sector is developing. The approaches that are used in GME are a very effective example of language learning in Scotland.  Children learn the language to a high level of fluency which enables them to access learning through Gaelic, while achieving expected attainment levels in all areas of the curriculum.

Overall, inspectors found that most children and young people in GME were making good progress in developing their fluency. By the senior phase, attainment in Gàidhlig as a subject is strong.  Interest in the role of Gaelic (Learners) as an additional language, and the development of GME in some areas of Scotland, is growing.

In this blog, I would like to consider three areas that should be given initial consideration in using the QuISE report as part of the improvement journey for GME.

  1. Being a self-improving GME provision

Education Scotland aims to support practitioners as they build capacity for improvement. The QuISE report presents an important source for practitioners’ use in self-evaluation. The chapters for early learning and childcare, primary and secondary, should be used along with the one on GME. Education Scotland’s Advice on Gaelic Education gives a strategic guide to what constitutes high-quality national practice, some of which now forms statutory Guidance. Taken together with self-evaluation frameworks, practitioners have a rich resource to enable an in-depth focus on Gaelic. Senior leaders, along with other practitioners, should take time to use these resources for self-evaluation. In future inspections, we would like to evidence improved leadership of GME, with Gaelic being at the heart of strategic planning and part of continuous improvement.      

2. Closing the attainment gap

An important outcome of GME is that children attain equally well, or better, than their peers in English medium education. This gives parents confidence in GME for which we need to have a relentless focus on high-quality attainment and progress. In our forthcoming inspections, we would like to see practitioners, and indeed the children and young people themselves, being clearer on their progress and how to improve further. To clarify expectations, teachers assisted us in designing Benchmarks for literacy and Gàidhlig. These need to be used in the joint planning of learning, teaching and assessment;  for monitoring and tracking of progress and in the moderation of standards.

At all times, practitioners have an important role in interacting skilfully with children, while modelling good immersion techniques to help children acquire the language. Practitioners’ skill in doing this impacts on children’s fluency. Playroom experiences are threaded together and given direction with a curriculum framework that promotes continuity and progression.

Education Scotland’s Advice on Gaelic Education (particularly chapter 7), coupled with Building the Ambition, (particularly chapters 6 and 7), present practitioners with effective pedagogy for early learning in GME. Building the Curriculum 2 details children’s natural disposition “to wonder, to be curious, to pose questions, to experiment, to suggest, to invent and to explain”. In the immersion playroom, practitioners will engage in short periods of activities that they will lead as part of children’s intended learning. At other times, children will be choosing what they play which they may initiate as they follow their interests, or be an experience planned by practitioners.

If we are to close the attainment gap in GME, we need to recognise the early gains from a strong total immersion experience as part of early learning and childcare. For this, children need to hear and absorb very fluent Gaelic across a range of play contexts.   Practitioners’ quality and frequent interactions are key drivers in helping children to acquire fluency as they foster learning which is creative, investigative and exploratory.

3. Improving the leadership of the GME curriculum

The QuISE  report highlighted that our strong primary GME provisions are clear on the correlation between immersion, fluency and impact on attainment.   At the secondary stages, there is still more to do to ensure young people have enough opportunities to learn through Gaelic. We recognise in the QuISE  report that there are challenges from shortages of Gaelic-speaking practitioners.  However, we ask for more of a solution-focused approach.  Our Advice on Gaelic Education  (particularly chapters 9-13) gives strategic direction to the development of the GME secondary curriculum.

In our forthcoming inspections, we would like to see much more prominence given to those learning in GME as a group for whom pathways need to be developed. It would be useful to continue to develop a shared understanding of how Curriculum for Excellence, with its emphasis on the totality of learning, may be maximised for GME. Speakers of Gaelic are a key driver in planning the curriculum. Could more of our Gaelic-speaking practitioners in schools be delivering some aspect of the curriculum in Gaelic?  Could they, for example, be encouraged to deliver a subject, club, universal support or an opportunity for achievement through Gaelic?  The African proverb, “It takes a village to raise a child” chimes with the need to increase the role of partners in the GME curriculum.  A good starting point would be for curriculum planners to know who their Gaelic-speaking partners are, and begin to ascertain how they can assist with planning and delivery of learning.

Finally, I would like to invite you to a seminar at the Scottish Learning Festival which focuses on how technology can increase learning through the medium of Gaelic. e-Sgoil presents a digital solution to delivering the curriculum. The headteacher of e-Sgoil will share an evaluation of some pilots that ran this year. Information on how to register for this seminar, and the festival programme, are available here.