Tag Archives: learners

Boarding Pass – @FernwoodDT⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

I saw this idea on Twitter originally and like most of our resources it was amended to our students. The concept is simple the ‘Boarding Pass’ is given to students as they enter the classroom and are instructed to fill in their name and ‘One fact from last lesson’ the teacher then goes through some […]

Using Blogs for e-Assessment⤴

from @ eCurriculum Blog

As with many Web2.0 tools the emphasis on communication and collaboration means that many types of social software are becoming recognised as valuable learning tools that can be particularly useful to assess contributions of individual learners to group outcomes. Blogs can be used in this manner and have the potential to become powerful tools to provide evidence of deep learning and reflection.

Community blogs can be used to document progress towards the completion of a group task and the chronological aspects of the software are helpful in monitoring progress, achievement and contributions. Consideration of the extent to which authentication is required and indeed how it's managed will determine how this type of software is deployed within an institution.

blog Blogs provide an  ideal solution when the documentation of learning processes is needed, often a challenge for institutions and potentially quite "high risk" in terms of moderation and verification.  As with other social software the "signing in" requirements mean that activities are well documented and can be monitored relatively easily. Comment facilities provide a mechanism for peer assessment - provided good guidelines and support for the whole process is in place.

Blogs can be used as a journal and to assist personal development planning, documenting progress towards the achievement of goals. Staff at Dumfries and Galloway College are using Blogging software in quite a structured way very effectively with learners to encourage reflection and document progress. The ability to easily upload multimedia to web-based applications is of great value in many areas of the curriculum e.g. hairdressing students can take images of both the end result and also the processes that were involved. This could be applied in the same way in food production or the construction trades.

Balancing the need for structure (to ensure performance criteria is met) and learner autonomy is a challenge for institutions. It is argued greater structure undermines the authenticity of postings and can compromise the opportunities for deep learning that Blogs can offer. It can't be denied though that using technology seems to be more attractive to learners than putting pen to paper. Perhaps in the Further Education sector providing structure is an essential ingredient if the attractions of web 2.0 technologies are to be exploited and potential benefits are to be maximised.

Using Blogs for e-Assessment⤴

from @ eCurriculum Blog

As with many Web2.0 tools the emphasis on communication and collaboration means that many types of social software are becoming recognised as valuable learning tools that can be particularly useful to assess contributions of individual learners to group outcomes. Blogs can be used in this manner and have the potential to become powerful tools to provide evidence of deep learning and reflection.

Community blogs can be used to document progress towards the completion of a group task and the chronological aspects of the software are helpful in monitoring progress, achievement and contributions. Consideration of the extent to which authentication is required and indeed how it's managed will determine how this type of software is deployed within an institution.

blog Blogs provide an  ideal solution when the documentation of learning processes is needed, often a challenge for institutions and potentially quite "high risk" in terms of moderation and verification.  As with other social software the "signing in" requirements mean that activities are well documented and can be monitored relatively easily. Comment facilities provide a mechanism for peer assessment - provided good guidelines and support for the whole process is in place.

Blogs can be used as a journal and to assist personal development planning, documenting progress towards the achievement of goals. Staff at Dumfries and Galloway College are using Blogging software in quite a structured way very effectively with learners to encourage reflection and document progress. The ability to easily upload multimedia to web-based applications is of great value in many areas of the curriculum e.g. hairdressing students can take images of both the end result and also the processes that were involved. This could be applied in the same way in food production or the construction trades.

Balancing the need for structure (to ensure performance criteria is met) and learner autonomy is a challenge for institutions. It is argued greater structure undermines the authenticity of postings and can compromise the opportunities for deep learning that Blogs can offer. It can't be denied though that using technology seems to be more attractive to learners than putting pen to paper. Perhaps in the Further Education sector providing structure is an essential ingredient if the attractions of web 2.0 technologies are to be exploited and potential benefits are to be maximised.

Learning about Learners⤴

from @ eCurriculum Blog

A trip to the lovely city of York provided the venue for my first visit to the Higher Education Academy. The focus of the event was the dissemination of the outcomes a group of projects funded by the JISC e-Learning Programme which is investigating learners' experiences of e-learning.

learners This is the second phase of projects focusing on the learners' perspectives of e-learning (see In Their Own Words for the outcomes of phase 1) and as well as producing case studies of individual learner's experiences, I was particularly interested in the methods used to elicit authentic accounts from learners about the use of technology in the context of their learning.

I've been involved in facilitating focus groups in our supported institutions with learners and found it quite a challenge to get a full picture of where technology fits into a learner's own learning strategies. It's easy enough to find out what part institutionally provided systems and resources play but harder to find out what learners prefer to use themselves and I think a lot could be learned from investigating this further.

Some guidance on learner-centred evaluations based on the Phase 1 studies is available and useful examples of learner consent and learner profiling forms are available from the JISC. Methodologies explored by the JISCle2 projects have been packaged as toolkits and are available from the JISCle2 website now.

I found both the interview plus methodology,  email Pen Pal methodology particularly interesting and plan to investigate further with a view to incorporating them into own our focus group methodology. I'll keep you posted on developments.

Learning about Learners⤴

from @ eCurriculum Blog

A trip to the lovely city of York provided the venue for my first visit to the Higher Education Academy. The focus of the event was the dissemination of the outcomes a group of projects funded by the JISC e-Learning Programme which is investigating learners' experiences of e-learning.

learners This is the second phase of projects focusing on the learners' perspectives of e-learning (see In Their Own Words for the outcomes of phase 1) and as well as producing case studies of individual learner's experiences, I was particularly interested in the methods used to elicit authentic accounts from learners about the use of technology in the context of their learning.

I've been involved in facilitating focus groups in our supported institutions with learners and found it quite a challenge to get a full picture of where technology fits into a learner's own learning strategies. It's easy enough to find out what part institutionally provided systems and resources play but harder to find out what learners prefer to use themselves and I think a lot could be learned from investigating this further.

Some guidance on learner-centred evaluations based on the Phase 1 studies is available and useful examples of learner consent and learner profiling forms are available from the JISC. Methodologies explored by the JISCle2 projects have been packaged as toolkits and are available from the JISCle2 website now.

I found both the interview plus methodology,  email Pen Pal methodology particularly interesting and plan to investigate further with a view to incorporating them into own our focus group methodology. I'll keep you posted on developments.