Tag Archives: Internet

Be Nice⤴

from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

beenice
  1. They comment on other people’s posts.
  2. They like other people’s posts.
  3. They share them.
  4. They…

from: What do nice Internet users do?

Click through to see all 12 points from Dave Winer who should know, having blogged as long than anyone.

From a education PoV good advice for reading and responding to pupils post, but applicable everywhere.

Featured image: Nice to be important by Michelle Grewe on Flickr shared with a Creative Commons — CC0 1.0 Universal license, which was nice.

Reading List: Facebook⤴

from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

solid-links

This is a experiment, I’ve generated a list of my recent (last 6 weeks) Pinboard: bookmarks tagged ‘facebook’ and post them below.

This will hopefully be a useful reference for me and perhaps others.

I’ve been thinking about Facebook quite a bit recently. I still only visit occasionally and feel fairly negative about it. When I do visit I often see interesting things about folk I know, but not enough to make me visit more often. I also recognise that it can be used for really interesting projects for example the EAST Project we talked about on on Radio #EDUtalk.

The video, linked to by Alan, held my attention for the full hour (I find it hard to watch online videos for more than a few minutes).

The Featured Images is Soild links | SONY DSC | Bernard Spragg. NZ | Flickr used under a public domain license. Stamped with the stamped attributor version of flickr cc attribution bookmarklet maker.

Fighting Linkrot⤴

from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

I quite often read above my understanding age, which is why Hapgood is in my RSS feeds. The other day I read: Connected Copies where I read this:

the future of the web involves moving away from the idea of centralized, authoritative locations and into something I call “connected copies”.

This lead me to AMBER where it says:

The Berkman Center for Internet & Society wants to keep linked content accessible.

Whether links fail because of DDoS attacks, censorship, or just plain old link rot, reliably accessing linked content is a problem for Internet users everywhere.

Having blogged for a while I am very aware of this problem, links I’ve made have fallen away. My bookmarks are full of holes.

Just the other day I linked to a couple of posts here that were made this month. They have already gone.1

Preserve Links Now. The plugin added this to my post editor.

Preserve Links Now. The plugin added this to my post editor.

I’ve installed the Amber WordPress Plugin here and set it to use the Internet Archive to ‘save links’ when I make them. I could have chosen to save them here, but I wonder if that could get messy?

The other thing that crosses my mind is what if people want to rub out something they have published. When a post is taken down deliberately, should I be archiving it?  The posts I mentioned above were deleted by the author (I presume). Should I then make public copies available?  That is what would have happened if I’d had the amber plugin working at the time.

I don’t know the answer to these questions or how the plugin works, but I’ll keep it running here for a while and look out for broken links.

After hitting the button

After hitting the button I get a list of links preserved. Presumably on the Internet Archive.

 

Featured image Flickr photo Public Domain: Image from page 28 of “The effect of black rot on turnips, a series of photomicrographs, accompanied by an explanatory text” (1903) | Flickr – Photo Sharing!

1. These links were to posts Dean Groom made about Microsoft acquiring Minecraft EDU. Strangely they have persisted in my RSS reader. I’d recommend a more recent one that is still there: Media Literacy: 5 key concepts to teach this year | Playable

Dark corners of the Internet⤴

from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

republica 2013 099 #rp13 by Blogging Dagger Attribution-ShareAlike License

How do we redirect seemingly inane goals of “connecting” beyond upping friend, follower, and subscriber counts towards notions of community and care and concern for each other, especially in places and conversations that are fraught with anger, frustration, and deep, deep potential for harm?

from: What We Don’t Talk about When We Talk about Connectedness by Bud The Teacher
Great Question, greatarticle gives no glib answer except some more good questions. I am sure I can’t answer it either but I don’t think the answer is to turn if off or ignore it. Children face danger in real life too, I wonder if we can learn from that?

Education Modern Learners is behind a membership wall, some articles like this one can be read with my free membership.

Blood on the rooftops⤴

from @ Mimanifesto - Jaye's weblog

Let’s skip the news boy (I’ll go and make some tea)
Arabs and Jews boy (too much for me)
They get me confused boy (puts me off to sleep)
And the thing I hate, oh Lord!
Is staying up late, to watch some debate, on some nation’s fate

There’s been a lot of debate about what should be shown on television recently. The tragic murder of a soldier near his barracks in London this past week has brought this sharply into focus. With the advent of twenty four hour news channels and the hundreds of choices we now have, its easy to forget that not so long ago when I was growing up,we only had three tv channels. But would they have stopped whatever was showing to give a continuous commentary on the tragic events of this week? Maybe. After all, the Iranian Embassy siege and the subsequent SAS rescue was shown live and I remember as a child being rather annoyed at the interruption to whatever it was I was watching at the time.

So do we live our lives through television? Has the cult of celebrity and social media interactivity led us to live in some international ‘real time’ where our lives are dominated not by what we do or who we are, but by other influences reaching us by cable,wifi and satellite?

I was reminded of this by the lyrics from the Genesis song, ‘Blood on the Rooftops’. From my favourite Genesis album, Wind and Wuthering (and I love the reference in the lyrics to another favourite of mine, Lindisfarne’s  Fog on the Tyne) Its about a couple whose lives are dominated by the television of their day. Written by Phil Collins, they refer to a “typical” middle-aged couple that have very little else to do with their lives than to watch TV, and complain about the content. The various references to TV programmes show how the escapism of fantasy and fiction impact so deeply on their lives that they have real problems distinguishing between that escapism and the grim events of the real world. What would they have made of the TV footage shown repeatedly, of the young soldier’s murder this week I wonder? And were the news channels right to show the tragic and gruesome footage over and over again? It’s certainly available on demand on the internet, but many will now be asking the question, should it be?  The middle aged couple who seem to be narrating the story in the song don’t appear to like the serious stuff, all that blood on the rooftops is too much for them. They would be horrified with the twenty four  hour news channels today.

I think we’ve crossed the Rubicon myself. Our lives are made up of a pastiche of soundbites from multimedia sources, and in fact, its changed the way we view most aspects of our lives. I suppose we must also accept that for all the benefits this brings, there will be some potentially big negatives too and maybe  the events of the past week, and perhaps the shootings of the striking South African miners last year (also shown repeatedly on TV) are examples of this which certainly make some hanker for the simpler way of life from days gone past. But as the Genesis song perhaps illustrates  the problem of living our lives through the media may always have been with us,in some shape or other…

Dark and grey, an English film, the Wednesday play
We always watch the Queen on Christmas Day
Won’t you stay?

Though your eyes see shipwrecked sailors you’re still dry
The outlook’s fine though Wales might have some rain
Saved again.

Let’s skip the news boy (I’ll go and make some tea)
Arabs and Jews boy (too much for me)
They get me confused boy (puts me off to sleep)
And the thing I hate, oh Lord!
Is staying up late, to watch some debate, on some nation’s fate.

Hypnotized by Batman, Tarzan, still surprised!
You’ve won the West in time to be our guest
Name your prize!

Drop of wine, a glass of beer dear what’s the time?
The grime on the Tyne is mine all mine all mine
Five past nine.

Blood on the rooftops, Venice in the spring
The Streets of San Francisco, a word from Peking
The trouble was started, by a young Errol Flynn
Better in my day, oh Lord!
For when we got bored, we’d have a world war, happy but poor
So let’s skip the news boy (I’ll go and make some tea)
Blood on the rooftops (too much for me)
When old Mother Goose stops, and they’re out for twenty three
Then the rain at Lords stopped play
Seems Helen of Troy has found a new face again.

“Blood on the Rooftops” as written by Phil Collins and Steve Hackett

Lyrics © EMI Music Publishing


Filed under: change Tagged: genesis, internet, Media, Phil Collins, Steve Hackett, TV, Woolwich murder

When is a Barcamp not a Barcamp?⤴

from @ Digitalkatie's blog

I went to Barcamp Glasgow this evening with DigitalSean. It was hosted in the very lovely venue of STV's Pacific Quay building and featured lots of interesting 20 minute talks largely on media and new media. We were given a list of sessions, most of which ran twice (in fact I ended up attending the Scottish Government session twice!) The sessions were by big name organisations: STV, BBC, Scottish Government, The Scotsman, Realtime Worlds

...but it was not a BarCamp.

The sessions were planned in advance. The programme was printed beforehand and given to attendees as they entered.

You could come and go in a limited way, unless you were in a room where you had to go through another session to get to the main area and the stairs.

The audience were just the audience though. After the end keynote session they had an attempt to have a more interactive session (difficult in a room with a couple of hundred people) but they asked all the speakers to put their hands up, again defining the audience as separate.

This is not the ethos of BarCamp or Unconference. It should be planned on the day on big sheets of paper, with the audience as the speakers, volunteering by writing their name on the big sheets of paper. It should be flexible, evolving as the day progresses depending on the interests of the participants and the themes that arise.

It was also sad to see so little Twitter backchannel, to the extent that the #barcamp hashtag was being used more frequently by people in Equador planning heir next Barcamp! This was an event about media: traditional, digital and social. There should have been a much greater electronic involvement.

I did very much enjoy the event. I came away enthused and inspired with ideas I want to put into practice. I would certainly be very keen to attend another media BarCamp, although next time I hope we all get to participate, to broadcast rather than just receive.


When is a Barcamp not a Barcamp?

When is a Barcamp not a Barcamp?⤴

from @ Digitalkatie's blog

I went to Barcamp Glasgow this evening with DigitalSean. It was hosted in the very lovely venue of STV's Pacific Quay building and featured lots of interesting 20 minute talks largely on media and new media. We were given a list of sessions, most of which ran twice (in fact I ended up attending the Scottish Government session twice!) The sessions were by big name organisations: STV, BBC, Scottish Government, The Scotsman, Realtime Worlds

...but it was not a BarCamp.

The sessions were planned in advance. The programme was printed beforehand and given to attendees as they entered.

You could come and go in a limited way, unless you were in a room where you had to go through another session to get to the main area and the stairs.

The audience were just the audience though. After the end keynote session they had an attempt to have a more interactive session (difficult in a room with a couple of hundred people) but they asked all the speakers to put their hands up, again defining the audience as separate.

This is not the ethos of BarCamp or Unconference. It should be planned on the day on big sheets of paper, with the audience as the speakers, volunteering by writing their name on the big sheets of paper. It should be flexible, evolving as the day progresses depending on the interests of the participants and the themes that arise.

It was also sad to see so little Twitter backchannel, to the extent that the #barcamp hashtag was being used more frequently by people in Equador planning heir next Barcamp! This was an event about media: traditional, digital and social. There should have been a much greater electronic involvement.

I did very much enjoy the event. I came away enthused and inspired with ideas I want to put into practice. I would certainly be very keen to attend another media BarCamp, although next time I hope we all get to participate, to broadcast rather than just receive.


When is a Barcamp not a Barcamp?