Tag Archives: Intel

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 7 of 17 – The first Follower⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

As part of the seminar programme at the #IntelVisionaries Conference Leslie Wilson (CEO of the One-to-One Institute and President of the Nexus Academy) gave a 45 minute presentation titled ‘Blazing the Trail for Today’s School Leaders’.

Much of her presentation was highly US centric but she did make some interesting points and it was good to be reminded about Project Red: A Global Toolkit for Education Transformation.

Project Red Cover

Regardless of where you are in the world the Project Red Toolkit is definitely worth having a look at if you are interested in developing sustainable 1:1 models within your school, district or country. Importantly, it is linked to independent research and evaluation of the impact that programmes like this can offer if they are implemented correctly and in a holistic way.

Lesley finished her talk with the ‘first follower’ video – which I am not sure I had seen before, but I certainly found quite amusing. It takes a very lighthearted approach to how replicating behaviour can lead to impact.

 

You can download the full transcript from Derek Sivers website (and also a version of the video if you don't want to rely on YouTube). There is also a lesson (that you can customise) on using the video over on TED-Ed.

 

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 7 of 17 – The first Follower⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

As part of the seminar programme at the #IntelVisionaries Conference Leslie Wilson (CEO of the One-to-One Institute and President of the Nexus Academy) gave a 45 minute presentation titled ‘Blazing the Trail for Today’s School Leaders’.

Much of her presentation was highly US centric but she did make some interesting points and it was good to be reminded about Project Red: A Global Toolkit for Education Transformation.

Project Red Cover

Regardless of where you are in the world the Project Red Toolkit is definitely worth having a look at if you are interested in developing sustainable 1:1 models within your school, district or country. Importantly, it is linked to independent research and evaluation of the impact that programmes like this can offer if they are implemented correctly and in a holistic way.

Lesley finished her talk with the ‘first follower’ video – which I am not sure I had seen before, but I certainly found quite amusing. It takes a very lighthearted approach to how replicating behaviour can lead to impact.

 

You can download the full transcript from Derek Sivers website (and also a version of the video if you don't want to rely on YouTube). There is also a lesson (that you can customise) on using the video over on TED-Ed.

 

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 6 of 17 – Transmedia⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

I really enjoyed Dr Wayne Grant's Presentation on Transmedia Education. Much of the presentation was covered under NDA so I can’t share some of the things that we saw here but I am able to cover some of the more general points.

Firstly, if you unfamiliar with Transmedia Education then you might find this definition from Wikipedia helpful?

“Transmedia Storytelling (also known as transmedia narrative or multiplatform storytelling, cross-media seriality) is the technique of telling a single story or story experience across multiple platforms and formats including, but not limited to, games, books, events, cinema and television.“

I liked this this short animation that was shown at the start of the presentation that shows quite nicely the sorts of things that are now possible within the domain of real-life and digital story telling in a rapidly interconnected world.

 

Wayne was all about engagement (and why wouldn’t he be!) and I liked the model he shared on the stages of student engagement from rebellion through compliance to true (and deep) engagement.

Levels-of-Student-Engagement

I hadn’t really though about stages of engagement linked to student classroom behaviours before and I can see how I might use this as we continue to develop and build on our already successful our self-evaluation procedures at the school.

Wayne also talked about some emerging transmedia elements on the horizon and encouraged us to think about the power of custom software and custom hardware and how much more effective they can be if they are combined. 

To illustrate this we took a sneak preview of a number of quite interesting kickstarter projects such as:

 

 

Linkitz Kickstarter video May 2015 from linkitz on Vimeo.

 

We also looked at some more established products in the context of transmedia education such as:

 

 

 

 

Finally, he also mentioned Project MC2 (a Netflix commissioned original series).

 

Products like Project MC2  are exciting for me as they have very high production values but the learning behind them is also very sound. Kind of reminds me of lots of the work we used to do around commercial off the shelf (COTS) games at the Consolarium. I’ll be checking out MCas soon as I get a chance because the short piece that I saw was very impressive – I also heard that it has been recommissioned for a second season?

With Intel’s acquisition of Kno (now Intel Education Study) in recent times hopefully we will start to see more Transmedia elements built into their software stack?

BTW – if you like the idea of Transmedia Education then do check out Inanimate Alice which is just a first class super product.

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 6 of 17 – Transmedia⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

I really enjoyed Dr Wayne Grant's Presentation on Transmedia Education. Much of the presentation was covered under NDA so I can’t share some of the things that we saw here but I am able to cover some of the more general points.

Firstly, if you unfamiliar with Transmedia Education then you might find this definition from Wikipedia helpful?

“Transmedia Storytelling (also known as transmedia narrative or multiplatform storytelling, cross-media seriality) is the technique of telling a single story or story experience across multiple platforms and formats including, but not limited to, games, books, events, cinema and television.“

I liked this this short animation that was shown at the start of the presentation that shows quite nicely the sorts of things that are now possible within the domain of real-life and digital story telling in a rapidly interconnected world.

 

Wayne was all about engagement (and why wouldn’t he be!) and I liked the model he shared on the stages of student engagement from rebellion through compliance to true (and deep) engagement.

Levels-of-Student-Engagement

I hadn’t really though about stages of engagement linked to student classroom behaviours before and I can see how I might use this as we continue to develop and build on our already successful our self-evaluation procedures at the school.

Wayne also talked about some emerging transmedia elements on the horizon and encouraged us to think about the power of custom software and custom hardware and how much more effective they can be if they are combined. 

To illustrate this we took a sneak preview of a number of quite interesting kickstarter projects such as:

 

 

Linkitz Kickstarter video May 2015 from linkitz on Vimeo.

 

We also looked at some more established products in the context of transmedia education such as:

 

 

 

 

Finally, he also mentioned Project MC2 (a Netflix commissioned original series).

 

Products like Project MC2  are exciting for me as they have very high production values but the learning behind them is also very sound. Kind of reminds me of lots of the work we used to do around commercial off the shelf (COTS) games at the Consolarium. I’ll be checking out MCas soon as I get a chance because the short piece that I saw was very impressive – I also heard that it has been recommissioned for a second season?

With Intel’s acquisition of Kno (now Intel Education Study) in recent times hopefully we will start to see more Transmedia elements built into their software stack?

BTW – if you like the idea of Transmedia Education then do check out Inanimate Alice which is just a first class super product.

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 5 of 17 – the Tech Museum of Innovation (@TheTechMuseum)⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

On one of the evenings we had dinner at the Tech Museum of Innovation. Before dinner we had a chance to play with some of the exhibits and I was impressed with the hands on practical nature of what we saw.

20151012_183507

As you might expect with an international audience Google Earth on an immersive surround screen (powered by Liquid Galaxy) proved to be very popular and also useful to find out exactly where everyone one lived!

20151012_185037

The software that the museum was using was the free Liquid Galaxy software from Google and although you might not have five plasma TVs at your disposal a couple of years ago I did manage to rig up a pretty neat experience using a few projectors and a couple of white sheets to create a (very rough around the edges) immersive room.

Another of the exhibits that was available was ‘design your own roller-coaster’. Here you used software to design a roller coaster and then after scanning your ticket you could ride the roller coaster in the simulator.

As well as teaching about design and physics what was nice about it was that if your design was unsafe then your ticket wouldn’t scan and you had to go back and modify your design.

20151012_184939

Some nice key messages from the museum as well. I especially liked, Imagine, Invent, Connect & Collaborate.

20151012_185731

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 5 of 17 – the Tech Museum of Innovation (@TheTechMuseum)⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

On one of the evenings we had dinner at the Tech Museum of Innovation. Before dinner we had a chance to play with some of the exhibits and I was impressed with the hands on practical nature of what we saw.

20151012_183507

As you might expect with an international audience Google Earth on an immersive surround screen (powered by Liquid Galaxy) proved to be very popular and also useful to find out exactly where everyone one lived!

20151012_185037

The software that the museum was using was the free Liquid Galaxy software from Google and although you might not have five plasma TVs at your disposal a couple of years ago I did manage to rig up a pretty neat experience using a few projectors and a couple of white sheets to create a (very rough around the edges) immersive room.

Another of the exhibits that was available was ‘design your own roller-coaster’. Here you used software to design a roller coaster and then after scanning your ticket you could ride the roller coaster in the simulator.

As well as teaching about design and physics what was nice about it was that if your design was unsafe then your ticket wouldn’t scan and you had to go back and modify your design.

20151012_184939

Some nice key messages from the museum as well. I especially liked, Imagine, Invent, Connect & Collaborate.

20151012_185731

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 4 of 17 – Meet and Mingle [@raff31]⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

Built into the programme of the week was a chance to share some interesting practice that was going on within your own school, district or country. These session were called ‘meet and mingle’ and they were spread over three session and two days around the themes

Theme One: Ed Tech, 1:1 Computing, tech solutions and frameworks

Theme Two: Education Transformation and leadership

Theme Three: Professional Learning and learning models/process 

I spoke in Theme Two: Education Transformation and leadership, about some of the work we have been doing at Kingussie High School. I also had a chance to talk about some of the wider policy drivers in Scottish Education.

In the session that I wasn’t presenting I valued the chance to get a round and see what other countries / schools were doing. I like education policy and its sessions like this that allow you to ‘borrow’ the best ideas from other systems and re-vent them for your own benefit.

20151012_161031

(interesting to find out about whats happening in Trinidad & Tobago)

During the 1:1 Strand it was pleasing to see that the steps we have taken within our own 1:1 role out in Kingussie seems to be consistent with emergent thinking from other areas. Pretty much everything we have done in Kingussie has been based on interesting practice borrowed from around the world and it was good to see that we seem to be holding our own when compared to bigger countries and global school districts.

Another key thing that I was reminded about during the session is how flexible and forward thinking the Scottish system actually is. It was evidence that a number of the other systems straightjacket creativity  and rely far to heavily in standardised test scores as the sole source of measuring student achievement.

20151012_154008

However, the person who stole the show at the ‘Meet and Mingle’ was Peter Rafferty or the ‘Glittery man’ as he quickly became known. Peter who teaches at Green Park Primary School (and does a whole heap of other things as well) had brought in letters from a number of children at his school explaining how they personally used technology both at home and at school. The letters were addressed to ‘the Intel people’ and all the delegates were tasked with replying to a letter from one of the children – felt tip pens, glitter and foam decorative shapes were obligatory in the reply. It was great to see everybody (including John Galvin) get involved.

It was lovely, powerful idea and great to be reminded about the importance of ‘low-tech’ at a technology conference. After all who actually gets a letter (that is not a bill) anymore – I am sure the children at Green Park will enjoy reading the replies (I just want to apologise in advance for my handwriting!).

Intel Letters

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 4 of 17 – Meet and Mingle [@raff31]⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

Built into the programme of the week was a chance to share some interesting practice that was going on within your own school, district or country. These session were called ‘meet and mingle’ and they were spread over three session and two days around the themes

Theme One: Ed Tech, 1:1 Computing, tech solutions and frameworks

Theme Two: Education Transformation and leadership

Theme Three: Professional Learning and learning models/process 

I spoke in Theme Two: Education Transformation and leadership, about some of the work we have been doing at Kingussie High School. I also had a chance to talk about some of the wider policy drivers in Scottish Education.

In the session that I wasn’t presenting I valued the chance to get a round and see what other countries / schools were doing. I like education policy and its sessions like this that allow you to ‘borrow’ the best ideas from other systems and re-vent them for your own benefit.

20151012_161031

(interesting to find out about whats happening in Trinidad & Tobago)

During the 1:1 Strand it was pleasing to see that the steps we have taken within our own 1:1 role out in Kingussie seems to be consistent with emergent thinking from other areas. Pretty much everything we have done in Kingussie has been based on interesting practice borrowed from around the world and it was good to see that we seem to be holding our own when compared to bigger countries and global school districts.

Another key thing that I was reminded about during the session is how flexible and forward thinking the Scottish system actually is. It was evidence that a number of the other systems straightjacket creativity  and rely far to heavily in standardised test scores as the sole source of measuring student achievement.

20151012_154008

However, the person who stole the show at the ‘Meet and Mingle’ was Peter Rafferty or the ‘Glittery man’ as he quickly became known. Peter who teaches at Green Park Primary School (and does a whole heap of other things as well) had brought in letters from a number of children at his school explaining how they personally used technology both at home and at school. The letters were addressed to ‘the Intel people’ and all the delegates were tasked with replying to a letter from one of the children – felt tip pens, glitter and foam decorative shapes were obligatory in the reply. It was great to see everybody (including John Galvin) get involved.

It was lovely, powerful idea and great to be reminded about the importance of ‘low-tech’ at a technology conference. After all who actually gets a letter (that is not a bill) anymore – I am sure the children at Green Park will enjoy reading the replies (I just want to apologise in advance for my handwriting!).

Intel Letters

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 3 of 17 – Intel Museum⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

Intel’s Global Headquarters in Santa Clara has a museum (well, why wouldn’t they?) it is free for the public to access and we managed to get a quick tour while we were visiting.

I like museums and I enjoyed the short amount of time that we had to explore Intel’s history.

20151012_102130

But, what I liked the most was how they had a classroom at the centre of the museum and all of the local schools are invited to visit with their students. A simple but important initiative for one of the original companies of Silicon Valley.

There were a few fun exhibits hidden away in the museum as well – such as elements from the periodic table scattered around the floor (made me think why we don’t just to that as standard in Science departments in new school builds?)

20151012_103200

The museum was pretty interactive as well and uses a number of simple demo to explain key concepts of computer science and chip manufacture. I liked the one with the foam balls the drainpipe to simulate bandwidth and network speed (I think I’ll recreate it back at school).

  20151012_104418

I also liked the visual display that showed you how big a nanometer was.

20151012_103729

Then there was of course the obligatory ‘Bunny Suit’ demo.

Finally, I was quite taken by this quote from Robert Noyce (one of the Intel founders), “Don’t be encumbered by history. Go off and do something wonderful.” – it is pretty good inspiration for schools as well.

20151012_104654

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 3 of 17 – Intel Museum⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

Intel’s Global Headquarters in Santa Clara has a museum (well, why wouldn’t they?) it is free for the public to access and we managed to get a quick tour while we were visiting.

I like museums and I enjoyed the short amount of time that we had to explore Intel’s history.

20151012_102130

But, what I liked the most was how they had a classroom at the centre of the museum and all of the local schools are invited to visit with their students. A simple but important initiative for one of the original companies of Silicon Valley.

There were a few fun exhibits hidden away in the museum as well – such as elements from the periodic table scattered around the floor (made me think why we don’t just to that as standard in Science departments in new school builds?)

20151012_103200

The museum was pretty interactive as well and uses a number of simple demo to explain key concepts of computer science and chip manufacture. I liked the one with the foam balls the drainpipe to simulate bandwidth and network speed (I think I’ll recreate it back at school).

  20151012_104418

I also liked the visual display that showed you how big a nanometer was.

20151012_103729

Then there was of course the obligatory ‘Bunny Suit’ demo.

Finally, I was quite taken by this quote from Robert Noyce (one of the Intel founders), “Don’t be encumbered by history. Go off and do something wonderful.” – it is pretty good inspiration for schools as well.

20151012_104654