Tag Archives: Intel Visionaries / Intel Ambassadors

‘You know you are a Global Educator when you…’ [a book by @julielindsay] #intelvisionaries⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

Julie opening slide

I’ve known Julie Lindsay online (mainly through Twitter) for what seems like a very long time. I particularly remember some of her early work around the Flat Classroom Project that she co-founded with Vicki Davis (AKA: @coolcatteacher) back in 2006. We also share a joint early influencer in the form of David Warlick (@dwarlick) who was one of the first people to inspire me to think differently about how we use technology in schools back in 2005.

Julie is a passionate educator with a particular interest and specialisation in global education. This specialism is not surprising considering she is Australian but worked across Asia, Africa and the Middle East in a variety of international schools and universities. As well as working physically in these places Julie also has extensive experience of connecting and collaborating with hundreds of educators online.

The Global EducatorJulie was at ISTE 2016 to launch her new book, “The Global Educator”. I read the first few chapters of her book when she gave me a signed copy in Colorado last summer and I finished it off over the recent Christmas break (which now seems like a long time ago!).

Not a lot of new stuff for me personally but I can see what a useful guide this might be for someone just starting out.

Julie proposes six things that might help educators know if they were global educators or not. The six things aren't meant to be exhaustive and are really just really a guide or a self-evaluation tool.

Julie says, you know you are a Global Educator when you…

  • Connect and share - eg: has an understanding of ‘connectivism’ and networked learning, builds a personal learning network, establishes a strong global brand, contributes oneline globally daily as part of established workflow, etc.
  • ‘Flatten’ the learning - eg: learns about the world with the world, is able to sustain connections and collaborations. Understands that learning in a digital world means working with others at a distance and online, etc.
  • Encorage and model global citizenship - eg: fosters global competency through global context, has empathy learning with other cultures, adopts and encourages multiple perspectives, etc.
  • Collaborate anywhere, anytime - eg: collaborates with anyone, anywhere, anytime, in anyway possible, is adept at teacher sourcing, builds on-line global communities, etc.
  • Use online technology - eg: is able to use both synchronous and asynchronous online technologies to bring learners together, knows how to use the web to publish global experiences, is digitally fluent across devices and software, etc.
  • Design futuristic learning environments to connect with the world - eg: is able to design learning in order to develop students global competencies, in conversant with design thinking, understands the importance of collaboration as a global learning objective, etc.

In her book Julie builds on these six principles and goes into more depth about what they mean as well as providing some nice little real life examples. I personally found the list quite re-assuring but it certainly got me reflecting and thinking about how many of my staff would actually be able to tick of some (or all) of these things as regular practice.

Another part of Julie’s work that I liked was her thoughts on an Online Global Collaboration Taxonomy. Show in the picture below:

Global Collaboration Taxonomy



Overall, lots to think about and a guide that I am sure I will dip in and out of from time to time.

Meeting Prof. Mitch Resnick the father of Scratch (@mres) #IntelVisionaries⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

Mitch Introduction

I met Mitch Resnick as part of the 2016 Intel Education Visionaries meet-up in Denver, Colorado in June 2016.

I was reminded of our conversation and also the main points of his keynote presentation as I read an article on the plane back from #BETT2017. The article was written by Professor Resnick in the new 'hello world' and was a tribute to his late mentor Seymour Papert (more about Seymour later).

Anyway, Mitch is a personal education hero of mine and most importantly he also likes cycling (he has even cycled in Scotland!).

Now, if you have not heard about Mitch you should know that he is a LEGO Papert Professor of Learning Research (how cool a title is that) and head of the Lifelong Kindergarten group at the MIT Media Lab which explores how new technologies can engage people (particularly children) in creative learning experiences.

Professor Resnick's research group developed the "programmable brick" technology that inspired the LEGO Mindstorms robotics kit. He co-founded the Computer Clubhouse project, a worldwide network of after-school centers where youth from low-income communities learn to express themselves creatively with new technologies. His team also developed Scratch, an online community where children program and share interactive stories, games, and animations.

Mitch’s achievements speak for themselves but the thing I want to stress here is the fact that he was a thoroughly nice guy. For all he has done there was no ego or arrogance. Just deep and unquestionable enthusiasm to make a difference. I loved chatting to him over Ice cream as we talked about the development of Scratch and other MIT projects. We even had a great chat about the Picocricket (which was just years ahead of its time in STEAM related maker activities).

Mitch gave the opening Keynote on the first morning of the 2016 Intel Education Visionaries  conference and he didn’t disappoint.

He started talking about some of the very early ‘maker’ projects he was involved in with young people such as the construction of gerbil traps, roller balde speedometers and diary security cameras. He emphasised the importance of these projects. Not because they were necessarily important you society or the economy but because they were so important (passionately important) to the young people who had designed and constructed them. He stressed that, “education needs to build on interests and by doing this develop deep ideas,”  that, “Making and coding a great way to share with others,” and that, “sharing is the best way to develop creative thinking”.

Next Mitch went on to explain the four Ps of Creative Learning Projects, Passion, Peers and Play.

Mitch and the four Ps

On Projects

Mitch quoted Dale Dougherty the founder of make Magazine who said, The Project is the basic unit of making’. I quite agree. Far too many ‘maker’ activities are about following a set of instructions to make product that may or may not solve a problem. Rather than students finding a problem and then deciding on who they will solve that problem through the trial and error of a project based approach.

A good example might be code.org where students follow the turotial to make the sprite move rather than working out how to move them themsleves or better still allowing creativity to flow and allowing the learning to decide how they want the sprite to move or dance or spin around?

 

On Passion

When Mitch talked about passion he warned the audience of the dangers of badges rewards and points. Rightly he described this as extrinsic motivation which the research shows can make you more efficient (because you want to get a short term reward) but it won’t make you more creative.

This is further illustrated in Daniel Pink's work within his 2011 book Drive and in his TED Talk, “The Puzzle of Motivation”.

Referring back to Scratch Mitch suggested that the diversity of the projects in the Scratch community which include games, drawings, animations and videos demonstrate that many of the people within the Scratch community are indeed following their passions. The ability for people to be able to follow their passions in return is one of the things that makes the community a success.

One of the most well know Scratch users is Ipzy and she is a great example of someone who is following their passions.

On Peers

Peer based learning is still one of the most powerful ways for everyone to learn.

On of the reasons that Scratch is special is because it is a programming language and an online community. The two have always co-existed and shouldn’t be separated.

 

On Play

Everything Mitch said on Play resonated with me. I dropped the term Games Based Learning years ago, instead preferring the term ‘playful learning’.

Seymour Papert (one of Professor Resnick’s mentors and author of the book Mindstorms: Children, Computers, And Powerful Ideas) uses the term ’hard fun’ and the challenge that Mitch set was ‘how do you create hard fun?’. He also encouraged us to explore tinkering suggesting that in his experience there wasn’t many things better to help you discover and create a playful spirit. One of my favorite books ‘The Art of Tinkering’ also got a mention.

The Art of Tinkering

In the Question and Answer Session that followed the presentation lots of good questions came up. Including the need to also teach knowledge and how you can then build on this knowledge through the use of projects and discovery. Tony Wagner supports this idea in his own research on transforming education and creating innovators.

 

Other links mentioned:

  • Brightworks School, San Francisco - A school that uses real tools, real materials, and real problems to encourage students’ love of learning and curiosity about the world.
  • ScratchED - the Creative Computing Curriculum Guide
  • Build in Progress - A website that lets you share what you build as you build it.

Ollie and Mitch

________________________________________________________________________

BTW - I'm slowly moving all my content over to a new server and a new version of olliebray.com (watch this space...).

Meeting Prof. Mitch Resnick the father of Scratch (@mres) #IntelVisionaries⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

Mitch Introduction

I met Mitch Resnick as part of the 2016 Intel Education Visionaries meet-up in Denver, Colorado in June 2016.

I was reminded of our conversation and also the main points of his keynote presentation as I read an article on the plane back from #BETT2017. The article was written by Professor Resnick in the new 'hello world' and was a tribute to his late mentor Seymour Papert (more about Seymour later).

Anyway, Mitch is a personal education hero of mine and most importantly he also likes cycling (he has even cycled in Scotland!).

Now, if you have not heard about Mitch you should know that he is a LEGO Papert Professor of Learning Research (how cool a title is that) and head of the Lifelong Kindergarten group at the MIT Media Lab which explores how new technologies can engage people (particularly children) in creative learning experiences.

Professor Resnick's research group developed the "programmable brick" technology that inspired the LEGO Mindstorms robotics kit. He co-founded the Computer Clubhouse project, a worldwide network of after-school centers where youth from low-income communities learn to express themselves creatively with new technologies. His team also developed Scratch, an online community where children program and share interactive stories, games, and animations.

Mitch’s achievements speak for themselves but the thing I want to stress here is the fact that he was a thoroughly nice guy. For all he has done there was no ego or arrogance. Just deep and unquestionable enthusiasm to make a difference. I loved chatting to him over Ice cream as we talked about the development of Scratch and other MIT projects. We even had a great chat about the Picocricket (which was just years ahead of its time in STEAM related maker activities).

Mitch gave the opening Keynote on the first morning of the 2016 Intel Education Visionaries  conference and he didn’t disappoint.

He started talking about some of the very early ‘maker’ projects he was involved in with young people such as the construction of gerbil traps, roller balde speedometers and diary security cameras. He emphasised the importance of these projects. Not because they were necessarily important you society or the economy but because they were so important (passionately important) to the young people who had designed and constructed them. He stressed that, “education needs to build on interests and by doing this develop deep ideas,”  that, “Making and coding a great way to share with others,” and that, “sharing is the best way to develop creative thinking”.

Next Mitch went on to explain the four Ps of Creative Learning Projects, Passion, Peers and Play.

Mitch and the four Ps

On Projects

Mitch quoted Dale Dougherty the founder of make Magazine who said, The Project is the basic unit of making’. I quite agree. Far too many ‘maker’ activities are about following a set of instructions to make product that may or may not solve a problem. Rather than students finding a problem and then deciding on who they will solve that problem through the trial and error of a project based approach.

A good example might be code.org where students follow the turotial to make the sprite move rather than working out how to move them themsleves or better still allowing creativity to flow and allowing the learning to decide how they want the sprite to move or dance or spin around?

 

On Passion

When Mitch talked about passion he warned the audience of the dangers of badges rewards and points. Rightly he described this as extrinsic motivation which the research shows can make you more efficient (because you want to get a short term reward) but it won’t make you more creative.

This is further illustrated in Daniel Pink's work within his 2011 book Drive and in his TED Talk, “The Puzzle of Motivation”.

Referring back to Scratch Mitch suggested that the diversity of the projects in the Scratch community which include games, drawings, animations and videos demonstrate that many of the people within the Scratch community are indeed following their passions. The ability for people to be able to follow their passions in return is one of the things that makes the community a success.

One of the most well know Scratch users is Ipzy and she is a great example of someone who is following their passions.

On Peers

Peer based learning is still one of the most powerful ways for everyone to learn.

On of the reasons that Scratch is special is because it is a programming language and an online community. The two have always co-existed and shouldn’t be separated.

 

On Play

Everything Mitch said on Play resonated with me. I dropped the term Games Based Learning years ago, instead preferring the term ‘playful learning’.

Seymour Papert (one of Professor Resnick’s mentors and author of the book Mindstorms: Children, Computers, And Powerful Ideas) uses the term ’hard fun’ and the challenge that Mitch set was ‘how do you create hard fun?’. He also encouraged us to explore tinkering suggesting that in his experience there wasn’t many things better to help you discover and create a playful spirit. One of my favorite books ‘The Art of Tinkering’ also got a mention.

The Art of Tinkering

In the Question and Answer Session that followed the presentation lots of good questions came up. Including the need to also teach knowledge and how you can then build on this knowledge through the use of projects and discovery. Tony Wagner supports this idea in his own research on transforming education and creating innovators.

 

Other links mentioned:

  • Brightworks School, San Francisco - A school that uses real tools, real materials, and real problems to encourage students’ love of learning and curiosity about the world.
  • ScratchED - the Creative Computing Curriculum Guide
  • Build in Progress - A website that lets you share what you build as you build it.

Ollie and Mitch

________________________________________________________________________

BTW - I'm slowly moving all my content over to a new server and a new version of olliebray.com (watch this space...).

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 7 of 17 – The first Follower⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

As part of the seminar programme at the #IntelVisionaries Conference Leslie Wilson (CEO of the One-to-One Institute and President of the Nexus Academy) gave a 45 minute presentation titled ‘Blazing the Trail for Today’s School Leaders’.

Much of her presentation was highly US centric but she did make some interesting points and it was good to be reminded about Project Red: A Global Toolkit for Education Transformation.

Project Red Cover

Regardless of where you are in the world the Project Red Toolkit is definitely worth having a look at if you are interested in developing sustainable 1:1 models within your school, district or country. Importantly, it is linked to independent research and evaluation of the impact that programmes like this can offer if they are implemented correctly and in a holistic way.

Lesley finished her talk with the ‘first follower’ video – which I am not sure I had seen before, but I certainly found quite amusing. It takes a very lighthearted approach to how replicating behaviour can lead to impact.

 

You can download the full transcript from Derek Sivers website (and also a version of the video if you don't want to rely on YouTube). There is also a lesson (that you can customise) on using the video over on TED-Ed.

 

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 7 of 17 – The first Follower⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

As part of the seminar programme at the #IntelVisionaries Conference Leslie Wilson (CEO of the One-to-One Institute and President of the Nexus Academy) gave a 45 minute presentation titled ‘Blazing the Trail for Today’s School Leaders’.

Much of her presentation was highly US centric but she did make some interesting points and it was good to be reminded about Project Red: A Global Toolkit for Education Transformation.

Project Red Cover

Regardless of where you are in the world the Project Red Toolkit is definitely worth having a look at if you are interested in developing sustainable 1:1 models within your school, district or country. Importantly, it is linked to independent research and evaluation of the impact that programmes like this can offer if they are implemented correctly and in a holistic way.

Lesley finished her talk with the ‘first follower’ video – which I am not sure I had seen before, but I certainly found quite amusing. It takes a very lighthearted approach to how replicating behaviour can lead to impact.

 

You can download the full transcript from Derek Sivers website (and also a version of the video if you don't want to rely on YouTube). There is also a lesson (that you can customise) on using the video over on TED-Ed.

 

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 6 of 17 – Transmedia⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

I really enjoyed Dr Wayne Grant's Presentation on Transmedia Education. Much of the presentation was covered under NDA so I can’t share some of the things that we saw here but I am able to cover some of the more general points.

Firstly, if you unfamiliar with Transmedia Education then you might find this definition from Wikipedia helpful?

“Transmedia Storytelling (also known as transmedia narrative or multiplatform storytelling, cross-media seriality) is the technique of telling a single story or story experience across multiple platforms and formats including, but not limited to, games, books, events, cinema and television.“

I liked this this short animation that was shown at the start of the presentation that shows quite nicely the sorts of things that are now possible within the domain of real-life and digital story telling in a rapidly interconnected world.

 

Wayne was all about engagement (and why wouldn’t he be!) and I liked the model he shared on the stages of student engagement from rebellion through compliance to true (and deep) engagement.

Levels-of-Student-Engagement

I hadn’t really though about stages of engagement linked to student classroom behaviours before and I can see how I might use this as we continue to develop and build on our already successful our self-evaluation procedures at the school.

Wayne also talked about some emerging transmedia elements on the horizon and encouraged us to think about the power of custom software and custom hardware and how much more effective they can be if they are combined. 

To illustrate this we took a sneak preview of a number of quite interesting kickstarter projects such as:

 

 

Linkitz Kickstarter video May 2015 from linkitz on Vimeo.

 

We also looked at some more established products in the context of transmedia education such as:

 

 

 

 

Finally, he also mentioned Project MC2 (a Netflix commissioned original series).

 

Products like Project MC2  are exciting for me as they have very high production values but the learning behind them is also very sound. Kind of reminds me of lots of the work we used to do around commercial off the shelf (COTS) games at the Consolarium. I’ll be checking out MCas soon as I get a chance because the short piece that I saw was very impressive – I also heard that it has been recommissioned for a second season?

With Intel’s acquisition of Kno (now Intel Education Study) in recent times hopefully we will start to see more Transmedia elements built into their software stack?

BTW – if you like the idea of Transmedia Education then do check out Inanimate Alice which is just a first class super product.

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 6 of 17 – Transmedia⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

I really enjoyed Dr Wayne Grant's Presentation on Transmedia Education. Much of the presentation was covered under NDA so I can’t share some of the things that we saw here but I am able to cover some of the more general points.

Firstly, if you unfamiliar with Transmedia Education then you might find this definition from Wikipedia helpful?

“Transmedia Storytelling (also known as transmedia narrative or multiplatform storytelling, cross-media seriality) is the technique of telling a single story or story experience across multiple platforms and formats including, but not limited to, games, books, events, cinema and television.“

I liked this this short animation that was shown at the start of the presentation that shows quite nicely the sorts of things that are now possible within the domain of real-life and digital story telling in a rapidly interconnected world.

 

Wayne was all about engagement (and why wouldn’t he be!) and I liked the model he shared on the stages of student engagement from rebellion through compliance to true (and deep) engagement.

Levels-of-Student-Engagement

I hadn’t really though about stages of engagement linked to student classroom behaviours before and I can see how I might use this as we continue to develop and build on our already successful our self-evaluation procedures at the school.

Wayne also talked about some emerging transmedia elements on the horizon and encouraged us to think about the power of custom software and custom hardware and how much more effective they can be if they are combined. 

To illustrate this we took a sneak preview of a number of quite interesting kickstarter projects such as:

 

 

Linkitz Kickstarter video May 2015 from linkitz on Vimeo.

 

We also looked at some more established products in the context of transmedia education such as:

 

 

 

 

Finally, he also mentioned Project MC2 (a Netflix commissioned original series).

 

Products like Project MC2  are exciting for me as they have very high production values but the learning behind them is also very sound. Kind of reminds me of lots of the work we used to do around commercial off the shelf (COTS) games at the Consolarium. I’ll be checking out MCas soon as I get a chance because the short piece that I saw was very impressive – I also heard that it has been recommissioned for a second season?

With Intel’s acquisition of Kno (now Intel Education Study) in recent times hopefully we will start to see more Transmedia elements built into their software stack?

BTW – if you like the idea of Transmedia Education then do check out Inanimate Alice which is just a first class super product.

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 5 of 17 – the Tech Museum of Innovation (@TheTechMuseum)⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

On one of the evenings we had dinner at the Tech Museum of Innovation. Before dinner we had a chance to play with some of the exhibits and I was impressed with the hands on practical nature of what we saw.

20151012_183507

As you might expect with an international audience Google Earth on an immersive surround screen (powered by Liquid Galaxy) proved to be very popular and also useful to find out exactly where everyone one lived!

20151012_185037

The software that the museum was using was the free Liquid Galaxy software from Google and although you might not have five plasma TVs at your disposal a couple of years ago I did manage to rig up a pretty neat experience using a few projectors and a couple of white sheets to create a (very rough around the edges) immersive room.

Another of the exhibits that was available was ‘design your own roller-coaster’. Here you used software to design a roller coaster and then after scanning your ticket you could ride the roller coaster in the simulator.

As well as teaching about design and physics what was nice about it was that if your design was unsafe then your ticket wouldn’t scan and you had to go back and modify your design.

20151012_184939

Some nice key messages from the museum as well. I especially liked, Imagine, Invent, Connect & Collaborate.

20151012_185731

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 5 of 17 – the Tech Museum of Innovation (@TheTechMuseum)⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

On one of the evenings we had dinner at the Tech Museum of Innovation. Before dinner we had a chance to play with some of the exhibits and I was impressed with the hands on practical nature of what we saw.

20151012_183507

As you might expect with an international audience Google Earth on an immersive surround screen (powered by Liquid Galaxy) proved to be very popular and also useful to find out exactly where everyone one lived!

20151012_185037

The software that the museum was using was the free Liquid Galaxy software from Google and although you might not have five plasma TVs at your disposal a couple of years ago I did manage to rig up a pretty neat experience using a few projectors and a couple of white sheets to create a (very rough around the edges) immersive room.

Another of the exhibits that was available was ‘design your own roller-coaster’. Here you used software to design a roller coaster and then after scanning your ticket you could ride the roller coaster in the simulator.

As well as teaching about design and physics what was nice about it was that if your design was unsafe then your ticket wouldn’t scan and you had to go back and modify your design.

20151012_184939

Some nice key messages from the museum as well. I especially liked, Imagine, Invent, Connect & Collaborate.

20151012_185731

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 4 of 17 – Meet and Mingle [@raff31]⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

Built into the programme of the week was a chance to share some interesting practice that was going on within your own school, district or country. These session were called ‘meet and mingle’ and they were spread over three session and two days around the themes

Theme One: Ed Tech, 1:1 Computing, tech solutions and frameworks

Theme Two: Education Transformation and leadership

Theme Three: Professional Learning and learning models/process 

I spoke in Theme Two: Education Transformation and leadership, about some of the work we have been doing at Kingussie High School. I also had a chance to talk about some of the wider policy drivers in Scottish Education.

In the session that I wasn’t presenting I valued the chance to get a round and see what other countries / schools were doing. I like education policy and its sessions like this that allow you to ‘borrow’ the best ideas from other systems and re-vent them for your own benefit.

20151012_161031

(interesting to find out about whats happening in Trinidad & Tobago)

During the 1:1 Strand it was pleasing to see that the steps we have taken within our own 1:1 role out in Kingussie seems to be consistent with emergent thinking from other areas. Pretty much everything we have done in Kingussie has been based on interesting practice borrowed from around the world and it was good to see that we seem to be holding our own when compared to bigger countries and global school districts.

Another key thing that I was reminded about during the session is how flexible and forward thinking the Scottish system actually is. It was evidence that a number of the other systems straightjacket creativity  and rely far to heavily in standardised test scores as the sole source of measuring student achievement.

20151012_154008

However, the person who stole the show at the ‘Meet and Mingle’ was Peter Rafferty or the ‘Glittery man’ as he quickly became known. Peter who teaches at Green Park Primary School (and does a whole heap of other things as well) had brought in letters from a number of children at his school explaining how they personally used technology both at home and at school. The letters were addressed to ‘the Intel people’ and all the delegates were tasked with replying to a letter from one of the children – felt tip pens, glitter and foam decorative shapes were obligatory in the reply. It was great to see everybody (including John Galvin) get involved.

It was lovely, powerful idea and great to be reminded about the importance of ‘low-tech’ at a technology conference. After all who actually gets a letter (that is not a bill) anymore – I am sure the children at Green Park will enjoy reading the replies (I just want to apologise in advance for my handwriting!).

Intel Letters