Tag Archives: independence

Teach Languages Conference, 10 February 2018⤴

from @ My Languages


Teach Languages 2018
Teach Languages is a conference and exhibition for language teachers organised by Linguascope. The 2018 edition will take place on Saturday 10th February 2018.

Programme
The focus for the 2018 edition will be the teaching of grammar. Speakers include Sue CaveJuliet ParkIsabelle Jones and Judith Rifeser. To view a printable version of the full programme, click here.

Venue
Teach Languages is taking place at the Rich Mix Cultural Foundation in East London. Rich Mix is conveniently located just outside Shoreditch High Street station (Overground) and within walking distance of Liverpool Street station. There is also plenty of free parking spaces around the venue at the weekend. To help you find your way, we’ve produced a printable map for you to download. For travel details, check out the Rich Mix website

A day pass gives you access to any sessions and the exhibition area for the whole day. It also includes your delegate pack, refreshments and lunch.
The cost of a day pass is:
• £60 (£50 + VAT)
• £48 (£40 + VAT) if booked and paid online
• FREE* for Linguascope subscribers
*You will find your redemption code in the Staffroom section of the Linguascope website, under "Training Events"). Note that free tickets are subject to a £10 deposit (fully refundable if you attend on the day) to ensure that no place is wasted.

Sessions:
Creative Grammar: Developing Language Learner's independence • Isabelle Jones
With the new GCSE in sight and the need to produce writing in exam conditions, teaching and learning grammar has never been so important. This session will aim to introduce delegates to a range of strategies to develop the learning of grammar creatively from key stage 2 in order to produce independent and successful language learners ready for GCSE and beyond.

Grammar Moves • Sue Cave
Activities for developing grammatical understanding will be demonstrated. They have been tried and tested in Key Stage 2, however, they could equally be suitable for other age groups. Each activity will relate to the KS2 targets of the MFL Programme of Study. The emphasis will be on progression from word to sentence level both orally and written. Most of the activities include either movement or a kinaesthetic element and are designed to engage learners actively and creatively. All the examples will be in French but can be adapted for most languages.

The Final Countdown: Revision Revisited • Juliet Park
This session will focus on the lead up to the new exam, how we can help our students prepare for the new exam-style questions and be ready to apply grammar and vocabulary independently and spontaneously. This session will show effective ways to build exam-style practise into your lessons and ensure that students are getting sufficient exposure and practise both in the classroom and independently to help maximise their performance.

Grammar|in|con|text: Teaching grammar through film and other authentic resources in the TL • Judith Rifeser
The teaching of grammar, the use of cultural resources as well as the teaching in the target language are all key elements of the MFL agenda. But how can we make our teaching ARPS: authentic, relevant, purposeful and stimulating, whilst still ensuring students are getting to grips with complex grammatical structures and rules? In this session, we’ll explore examples of good practice, in particular through film, to teach grammar in context, focussing on developing their grammatical awareness and explicit grammar knowledge in the target language, whilst still allowing students to improve all their skills and learn grammar in a fun and motivating way.


More Information and online booking:  http://www.teachlang.com/  See you there!

Technology In Language Teaching SANAKO Conference, Altrincham Grammar School for Boys, 22nd October 2015⤴

from @ My Languages

I had a lovely morning today at Altrincham Grammar School for Boys with fellow language teachers and the SANAKO team.
As promised, here are  the slides I used for the session...
 


Technology In Language Teaching SANAKO Conference, Altrincham Grammar School for Boys, 22nd October 2015⤴

from @ My Languages

I had a lovely morning today at Altrincham Grammar School for Boys with fellow language teachers and the SANAKO team.
As promised, here are  the slides I used for the session...
 


Motivating Tools for Reading and Writing in the EAL and MFL Classroom, Practical Pedagogies, International School of Toulouse, 16th October 2015⤴

from @ My Languages

I had a fantastic time at  #pracped15, the Practical Pedagogies conference organised by @russeltarr at the International School of Toulouse. It was great to meet new people and finally meet people I have interacted with online for a very long time. Last but not least, it was fabulous to learn so much from them in such a great location-but I would say that, wouldn't I? ;)

Here are the slides I used for my session:

 

Motivating Tools for Reading and Writing in the EAL and MFL Classroom, Practical Pedagogies, International School of Toulouse, 16th October 2015⤴

from @ My Languages

I had a fantastic time at  #pracped15, the Practical Pedagogies conference organised by @russeltarr at the International School of Toulouse. It was great to meet new people and finally meet people I have interacted with online for a very long time. Last but not least, it was fabulous to learn so much from them in such a great location-but I would say that, wouldn't I? ;)

Here are the slides I used for my session:

 

Review: Languagenut, a Language Subscription Site with a Difference⤴

from @ My Languages


Created in 2009, Languagenut promotes a fun, simple and engaging approach to language learning for KS2 and KS3 pupils. Although Languagenut has its HQ in the UK, it now has users all over the world in 32 countries, from Puerto Rico and the US to Asia and it has adapted its platform to meet the curriculum needs in those different countries.

The range of languages offered is truly global but also supports heritage languages including Gaelic and Te Reo Maori. This is complemented by a unique range of EAL resources which supports the children in the UK who do not speak English as their first language.

The MFL and EAL resources rely on simple games, engaging students in simple, fun and effective learning activities. Students explore a set of words or phrases through the “presentation” feature, and then reinforce the language working across the key skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. All resources are organised by topics and graded by difficulty, with each topic also offering a song and a story to practise key structures in a different way. Each topic can also be assessed via the platform.

Teachers can also track and reward pupils’ progress through the activities whether they are completed in class or independently at home. All progress data can be exported into an Excel spreadsheet and progress reports including graphs can be produced easily. Reward certificates can also be generated automatically.

In addition, the “My content” allows teachers to use Languagenut’s framework of presentations, games and assessments for their own words and phrases. Sound and pictures can also be uploaded and the newly created exercises are automatically trackable by teachers as soon as they are published.
All exercises can also be assigned to specific groups of pupils or individuals, which can help differentiation for class work and homework.

Healthy competition is also encouraged via the lingualympics board, which displays the sign-in name of the top 20 students and 20 schools worldwide.

I was lucky enough to be taken on a guided tour of this excellent platform by the delightful Liz Brewer and I would advise to get in touch if you are considering languagenut as it does offer a lot more than your usual language subscription site…

Review: Languagenut, a Language Subscription Site with a Difference⤴

from @ My Languages


Created in 2009, Languagenut promotes a fun, simple and engaging approach to language learning for KS2 and KS3 pupils. Although Languagenut has its HQ in the UK, it now has users all over the world in 32 countries, from Puerto Rico and the US to Asia and it has adapted its platform to meet the curriculum needs in those different countries.

The range of languages offered is truly global but also supports heritage languages including Gaelic and Te Reo Maori. This is complemented by a unique range of EAL resources which supports the children in the UK who do not speak English as their first language.

The MFL and EAL resources rely on simple games, engaging students in simple, fun and effective learning activities. Students explore a set of words or phrases through the “presentation” feature, and then reinforce the language working across the key skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. All resources are organised by topics and graded by difficulty, with each topic also offering a song and a story to practise key structures in a different way. Each topic can also be assessed via the platform.

Teachers can also track and reward pupils’ progress through the activities whether they are completed in class or independently at home. All progress data can be exported into an Excel spreadsheet and progress reports including graphs can be produced easily. Reward certificates can also be generated automatically.

In addition, the “My content” allows teachers to use Languagenut’s framework of presentations, games and assessments for their own words and phrases. Sound and pictures can also be uploaded and the newly created exercises are automatically trackable by teachers as soon as they are published.
All exercises can also be assigned to specific groups of pupils or individuals, which can help differentiation for class work and homework.

Healthy competition is also encouraged via the lingualympics board, which displays the sign-in name of the top 20 students and 20 schools worldwide.

I was lucky enough to be taken on a guided tour of this excellent platform by the delightful Liz Brewer and I would advise to get in touch if you are considering languagenut as it does offer a lot more than your usual language subscription site…

Learning Vocabulary with FlashSticks⤴

from @ My Languages

FlashSticks®  are foreign language Post-it® notes, each printed with a foreign language word, their translation, an icon and phonetic support. The notes are colour-coded by gender too: BLUE notes for masculine nouns, PINK notes for feminine and GREEN for all other word types. FlashSticks also have a free app that allows learners to hover their smartphones or tablets over the notes and see the video of a native language tutor to help them with the pronunciation of the word.
 
I tried the Spanish and French beginner’s packs, which have notes for 100 words each. The idea behind FlashSticks is well-established practice in language learning: You need to be surrounded by what you learn, say the new words, reading them and listen to them.
 
The coulour-coding is very effective but I would not normally use “transcription” to support pronunciation as it can encourage learners to stop listening to the sounds of the new language to process them only through the transcription. However, as the notes benefit from audio support via the app, the transcription can act as a reminder of the correct pronunciation. I have also found the icon very useful to encourage recall.
 
As a pronunciation activity, pupils can highlight syllables, prefixes or suffixes in a different colour and practise saying them. This is particularly effective in Spanish, which does not have silent letters, but certainly more challenging in French.
 
The notes are great to encourage pupil independence and they also provide useful additional support for pupils with specific learning difficulties. They can also be used to play a wide range of games including noughts and crosses, where pronunciation is checked as a way to win the point and Guess my word, when other people have to give clues for the bearer of the notes to guess the word he/she is wearing and pelmanism games.
 
The translation or word in the target language can also be hidden in order to encourage quick recall. Maybe test packs with the word missing in the target language could be produced too?
 
The notes can also be added to classroom display ad worksheets to encourage independent speaking practice. As GCSEs and A Levels rely more and more on vocabulary acquisition and retention, I look forward to simple but effective tools like FlashSticks supporting all new examination specifications.