Tag Archives: inclusion

Children’s Library Club⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

“Children can only aspire to what they know exists.” Glasgow Children’s University, 2016 This statement illustrates the philosophy behind the Children’s Library club, offered to pupils of St Mungo’s Primary School every Wednesday from 3 o’clock, with students from the School of Education at the University of Strathclyde having full responsibility for planning, organising and […]

What helps young people feel included in school?⤴

from @ Reach

Hello, I’m Mark, I’m a 17-year-old pupil at school in Cumbernauld and I’m the Inclusion Ambassador for North Lanarkshire.

I went to Luxembourg to represent Scotland in a Europe-wide inclusive education conference. When we were there I got a good idea of what was important for pupils all over Europe – the key message is “Everything about us, with us”. We want to be heard and we want to have a say in anything that has to do with us. We are the experts in our own needs and we know what works and what doesn’t.

This is not just a message for politicians. It is the teachers that make the immediate difference to how inclusive a school is.

Take my school – before I moved up to high school my year head met with my parents and me. We worked out barriers for me in and around the school, spoke with teachers in private to make sure they understood my needs and made a clear plan for every type of situation at school. This might all seem quite a bit of work for one pupil, yet this only took three meetings and it was all made so much easier because of the talking and listening that went on between me and the teacher.

Sadly, some pupils do not have such a good experience as me, which is why I’m pleased to be one of the Inclusion Ambassadors for Education Scotland. We are a national group of young people who act as a ‘voice’ for pupils on inclusion. We share our views and experiences with Scottish Government Ministers, local authorities and schools. We are hoping to develop resources, a school pledge and a film in the coming months.

Here are three of our top priorities to make schools more inclusive:

  • Social Problems: being excluded at break times and not having enough chances to be included and make friends are big issues. My school found a way around this by setting up a club where pupils could play computer games and socialise. This helped pupils who were often quiet to come out of their shell.
  • Issues with Support staff: For some pupils (but not all), having support staff can sometimes feel like a barrier to their social life, and they might not need them as they get older.
  • Awareness: We feel that there isn’t enough done by schools to raise awareness of the issues that pupils face or the reasons they need support. The worst thing schools can do is to pick out a specific pupil – that’s just everyone’s worst nightmare – but what schools can do is to educate the year group that other people have different needs and promote the fact that you are a diverse and inclusive school so it’s great to have all types of pupils.

For me, talking and listening are the key to true inclusion because without this everything you might be doing could be entirely irrelevant to the pupil. After all, how can you include someone who isn’t involved in the conversation?

 

 

The post What helps young people feel included in school? appeared first on Reach.

Nominate a Family for a free break through Visit Scotland⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Free breaks for Scottish families. As part of VisitScotland’s Spirit of Scotland campaign a range of  businesses will offer  almost 100 vulnerable and disadvantaged Scottish families the opportunity to experience more of the Spirit of Scotland for themselves. All families must be referred by someone who knows them professionally like a teacher, social worker, health visitor or another charity.  To find out more and apply for a break click here http://www.familyholidayassociation.org.uk/scotspirit/

Tackling Gender Imbalances at Scotland’s Colleges and Universities⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

HE Tackling gender inequIn support of the Gender Balance Interim Report published by the Scottish Funding Council this research maps out the approaches currently taken by colleges and universities to address gender imbalance.  It aims to:

  • map current activities tackling student gender participation imbalances across Scotland’s FE sector;
  • assess what approaches work best and why in terms of achieving sustained change in relation to gender imbalances;
  • assess what approaches do not work;
  • offer recommendations for  tackling gender imbalances to achieve sustained improvements.

You can access the full report here: Post-proofread report – gender imbalances HEA

Interpersonal Small Group Mediation⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

The purpose of this guide is to support teachers/tutors in resolving conflicts within Learning Sets through Interpersonal Small Group Mediation strategies.  As I have expressed in a number of articles on my site collaborativegrouplearning.com, Learning Sets are dynamic group structures designed to engineer and facilitate both effective socialised-learning and social relationships. The three principles of: […]

Nursery to P1 transition process⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

“The current interpretation defines education transition as the change children make from one place, stage, style or subject over time. For children, educational transitions are characterised by the intense and accelerated developmental demands that they encounter as they move from one learning and teaching setting to another.” (Moyles, 2008, p229). Transition is an exciting time […]

LEARNING IN CARE REFERENCE TOOL⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

LEARNING_IN_CARE
Click to open pdf

This document aims to support care staff working collaboratively with education staff to support children and young people with their learning in the care setting. It recognises that care staff are already supporting children and young people’s learning in care, and aims to provide them with practical examples which will assist services to further improve learning outcomes for children and young people across care and education. The examples of learning experiences which follow are organised in the 3 key curriculum areas which are the responsibility of all: literacy, numeracy and health and wellbeing.

Click here to open the document as a pdf.

Click here to discuss this in the Inclusion Hub on GLOW.

CELCIS New Website – Design A Christmas card⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

CELCIS is looking for a looked after young person to help them by designing for  their  2015 Christmas card

Their New Website makes it  easier to keep up to speed with what’s going on for looked after children and young people in Scotland, and beyond. Find out more at their Knowledge Bank

Dyslexia Scotland – teachers welcome!⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

The theme of Dyslexia Awareness Week this year is ‘Making Sense of Dyslexia’, chosen to fit in with Education Scotland’s 2014 report ‘Making Sense: Education for Children and Young People in Scotland’. Lots of people think that we just work with children and adults with dyslexia and parents but that’s not so. Earlier this month, […]

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) – Free event for education professionals⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

FASD

Free Event for Education Professionals

10.00 – 15.00

17 November 2015

COSLA, Edinburgh, 19 Haymarket Yards, Edinburgh, EH12 5BH

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is the leading known preventable cause of permanent learning disability worldwide and is caused by maternal use of alcohol during pregnancy. Affected children can have a wide range of physical, growth and neurobehavioural problems which impact on their everyday lives and limit their independence.  Often teachers are the first professional to notice a child has difficulties.

As part of a programme of events over the last 4 years, the Scottish Government has arranged a free event for nursery and primary school teachers. The event’s keynote speaker is Dr Ana Hanlon-Dearman – a Developmental Paediatrician from the Manitoba FASD Centre in Canada. The Scottish Government has worked closely with Dr Hanlon-Dearman in moving FASD forward in Scotland. Dr Hanlon-Dearman has a wealth of experience working with schools in Manitoba, and will be discussing their work supporting children and young people, as well as tools that have proved successful.

For further information or to book a space on the event, please contact Jamie.garden@gov.scot 0131 244 4634.