Tag Archives: Inclusion and Equality

Training events: Respect for All and Included, Engaged and Involved Part 2⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

A training event on the recently published guidance documents –

Respect for All: The National Approach to Anti-bullying for Scotland’s Children and Young People
Included, Engaged and Involved Part 2: A Positive Approach to Managing School Exclusions

Background: ‘Respect for All’
‘Respect for All: The National Approach to Anti Bullying for Scotland’s Children and Young People’ was launched by the Deputy First Minister on Wednesday 15 November 2017. The main purpose of the refreshed guidance is to support all adults working with children and young people to develop environments where bullying cannot thrive. The document aims to encourage a proactive and inclusive approach to the development of anti bullying policies and guidance. The focus of this guidance is prevention and early intervention.

Included, Engaged and Involved Part 2
Included, Engaged and Involved Part 2: A Positive Approach to Preventing and Managing School Exclusions is a refreshed version of the previous guidance on managing school exclusions, which was published in March 2011. This refreshed guidance gives a stronger focus on approaches that can be used to prevent the need for exclusion. This guidance also contains new sections on de-escalation and physical intervention and on managing incidents involving weapons.

Training events
The training events will be delivered in partnership with Education Scotland and respectme, Scotland’s national anti-bullying service for young people.

‘Respect for All’ sessions will take place in the morning from 9.30 – 12.30 and the ‘Included, Engaged and Involved’ sessions will take place in the afternoon from 1.30 – 4.30. Tea and coffee will be provided at both sessions.

To confirm your place, please click on the link below at the venue you would like to attend. Places are limited and will be allocated on a first come first served basis on the following dates and locations.

If you wish to attend both training events on each date, please book onto both using the following links:

Respect for All Event
Edinburgh 23 February – Victoria Quay
Perth 8 March – Perth Concert Hall
Glasgow 12 March – ITE Building
Kilmarnock 14 March – The Park Hotel Kilmarnock
Stirling 16 March – Stirling Court Hotel
Aberdeen 20 March – Pittodrie Stadium

Included, Engaged and Involved Event
Edinburgh 23 February – Victoria Quay
Perth 8 March – Perth Concert Hall
Glasgow 12 March – ITE Building
Kilmarnock 14 March – The Park Hotel Kilmarnock
Stirling 16 March – Stirling Court Hotel
Aberdeen 20 March – Pittodrie Stadium

If you have any questions in the meantime please contact Carolyn Wales on 0131 244 4482 or email carolyn.wales@gov.scot or Iain Mitchell on 0131 244 1505 or iain.mitchell@gov.scot

Parkhill Secondary School: Preparing flexible learning pathways for young people with additional needs⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Parkhill Secondary School in Glasgow has developed an exciting and innovative approach to preparing young people with additional support needs for the world of work.  In partnership with colleges and employers the school has established their own Enterprise Academy that provides pupils with  work-based learning opportunities and industry relevant qualifications.

Access the outline of the programme here:

The following film clips outline the format, experiences and impact of the Academy programme :

The school has used the Career Education Standard to reflect on the progress made in delivering against the expectations set out within the standard:      Parkhill Sec School, CES self-evaluation

 

 

 

ILF Scotland Transition Fund Now Open!⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

ILF Scotland has now opened the Transition Fund! The Fund will initially support those aged between 16 and 21, who are at an important transitional stage in their lives.

The Fund will provide short term grants (with £5 million of funding available per year) to young disabled people, providing them with opportunities that facilitate their participation and inclusion within their communities, creating a lasting impact on their lives.

 

Public Health Minister Aileen Campbell said:

“We want everyone in society to have the same quality of life, and providing support to disabled people is one of the areas we have worked on. This Transition Fund will support young disabled people to take up opportunities to contribute to and participate in their communities, to help them live as independently as possible.

“We have worked directly with disabled people to develop this fund and to ensure that we give people choices and treat them with the fairness, dignity and respect they deserve. I would encourage all those who are eligible to apply for funding to do so now.”

 

Social Security Minister Jeane Freeman said:

“I’m delighted this fund is now open for application. Our Disability Action Plan lists a number of actions to transform the lives of disabled people in Scotland and that includes actions setting out to tackle the inequalities and barriers faced by disabled young people, including tackling social isolation, employment opportunities and improving lives at points of transition.”

Young disabled people will be able to apply to the Transition Fund for a grant to enable them to participate in activities in their communities they have never had the opportunity to before, such as joining a club or a class.

Ryan Cuzen, an individual looking to apply to the Transition Fund, said:

“I see this fund as a positive step forward and a gate opener for young disabled folk in transition to improve their lifestyle and to get out and about.

“I want to be able to try new adult orientated activities, like mixed martial arts, and applying to the Transition Fund would give me the chance to do this.

“The hope is that the fund will give young disabled people, including myself, more confidence and help to develop community social skills.”

Peter Scott, CEO of ILF Scotland, remarked:

“We are thrilled that our Transition Fund is now open, providing a real opportunity for young disabled people to break down social barriers, and to fully participate in their communities, enhancing their independence.

“Disabled people, their organisations and their carers have been at the heart of developing this fund and its implementation. We will continue to work closely with them to maximise positive outcomes and the impact of the Transition Fund for young disabled people.”

To find out more information about the Transition Fund, the full eligibility criteria and how to apply, please go to the Transition Fund section of our website here.

Making Scotland a STEM Nation⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

STEM Education and Training Strategy for Scotland has now been published

A STEM (Sciences Technologies, Engineering and Mathematics) Education and Training Strategy was launched in the Scottish Parliament last week by Ms Shirley-Anne Somerville, Minister for Further Education, Higher Education and Science. The Strategy, together with a STEM Evidence Base Report, is now available to download from: http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/10/1386/downloads

A central focus on the strategy is to enable everyone to develop STEM skills for learning, for life and for work. It provides a new emphasis on career pathways within STEM sectors and to grow successful  partnerships between schools and employers through the Developing the Young Workforce Programme.  The strategy also includes a commitment to expand Foundation, Modern and Graduate Apprenticeship Programmes to enable many to pursue jobs and careers in STEM through these pathways. This strong focus on skills and careers will further enhance national efforts to Develop the Young Workforce (DYW) and embed employment and career management skills in the curriculum through the Career Education Standard.

A wide variety and resources including exemplars around DYW and STEM can be accessed on the National Improvement Hub here.

 

Whole School Approach -reducing the cost of a school day⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Child Poverty Action Group has some good practice examples of working with partners in the community including local organisations to help towards reducing the cost of a school day see link below

 http://www.cpag.org.uk/content/it-takes-all-us-whole-school-approach-reducing-costs-school-day

 

Sleep in the Park: 1000 Free School Tickets!⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

This year Social Bite are bringing together 9,000 people in Princes Street Gardens, on the 9th of December, for the world’s largest ever Sleep-Out to try and end homelessness in Scotland for good. Participants will be joined by some of the world’s biggest artists to sleep in the cold for one night.
We have invited some amazing musicians to “busk” stripped back acoustics sets including Liam Gallagher, Deacon Blue, Amy Macdonald and Frightened Rabbit. We also have Rob Brydon hosting the event, Sir Bob Geldof sleeping out and John Cleese has agreed to come and read a bedtime story!

The website is: https://www.sleepinthepark.co.uk/
You can see a little video about the event here:

 Sleep In The Park Launch Video.mp4

Please note:  This allocation is for young people 16 and over and they must be accompanied by an adult.

Opportunity for Your School

Ordinarily, in order to participate in the event people have to pay an initial donation of £50 and commit to raise at least £50 more. However, we have had a wealthy individual donate £50,000 to fund the participation of 1,000 School kids (aged 16 and over).

Therefore I am writing to see if you would like to take an allocation of free tickets for children over 16 at your school. The group would need to commit to raising a minimum of £50 or more per person in order to take part, but would not have to pay any initial £50 registration fee as this has been entirely funded. They would also have to be accompanied to the event by a teacher(s).

We are giving the school ticket allocations out on a first come first served basis and we expect the demand to be high and the 1,000 available to be taken quickly. Therefore could you let me know if you would like an allocation of tickets? If so please let me know the number of tickets you would like for your school?

Josh Littlejohn MBE

Social Bite

Co-Founder

t: 0131 220 8206

 

Equality & Inclusion: Good practice exemplars⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The following four good practice exemplars have been published on the National Improvement Hub to highlight initiatives that help learners requiring additional support to develop skills and find employment.

Exemplar 1: Enable Scotland’s ‘Stepping Up’ programme

This innovative employability programme offers comprehensive support for young people aged 14 to 19 who have learning disabilities which takes participants from an initial investigation of the world of work, through a process of discovery and planning for their future, to engagement with employers in real workplace settings. Find out more here.

Exemplar 2: ‘Thinking Digitally’ – a new resource

This credit rate module by Lead Scotland allows candidates to develop relevant digital skills and build confidence operating in online environments.  More on this here.

Exemplar 3:  ‘TOPs’ – training opportunities for young parents

This programme run by Rathbone Training, a UK-wide voluntary youth sector organisation which supports young people aged 16 to 24 who have disengaged from society, aims to help young parents in their personal development. More here.

Exemplar 4: ‘Community Action and Leadership Award

This is a course created by the charity Lead Scotland so that more people can learn how to influence change and make a difference within their communities. More information here.

Children’s Rights and Learner Participation⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

There will be a day to refresh our ‘Realising and Recognising Children’s Rights’ professional learning resource which will also introduce some of the key messages in our new ‘Learner Participation in Educational Settings’ resource. We are currently recruiting schools to take part in a pilot to explore this resource. We will also be running a workshop on the resource at the Scottish Learning Festival on the 21 September 2017.

Date Event Venue Who is it for
21.9.17 Seminar at Scottish learning Festival

 

SEMINAR CODE L2H

Scottish Exhibition Centre Education Practitioners
20.10.17 Realising and recognising children’s rights and Learner Participation Atlantic Quay, Glasgow Those with an authority wide remit in rights and participation or senior managers or those with a remit within schools.

To book a place on the October training email the Inclusion Team and put ‘Children’s Rights’ in the e-mail subject heading.  Click here to book a place at the Scottish learning festival.

Professional Learning Opportunities with the Inclusion and Equalities team at Education Scotland⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

A 4 day professional learning course in secondary nurturing approaches, as well as a number of half day sessions, will be delivered before Christmas to introduce our new ‘Applying Nurture as a whole school approach: A framework to support self-evaluation’ resource.  See details below.

Date Event Venue Who is it for
28.9.17 9.30 am to 12.30 pm Recall Day for Secondary Nurturing approaches Atlantic Quay, Glasgow All those who attended secondary nurturing training in May/June 2017
5.10.17, 6.10.17, 8.11.17, 9.11.17 (4 days) Secondary nurturing approaches professional learning over 4 days Victoria Quay, Edinburgh All those who have an authority wide remit for taking forward nurturing approaches, Educational Psychologists and Senior Managers or those with a nurture remit in schools.
11.10.17 9.30 am to 12.30 pm Applying nurture as a whole school approach: A framework for self-evaluation professional learning Atlantic Quay, Glasgow As above. This professional learning will be most beneficial to those who have already undertaken some work on implementing nurturing approaches
27.10.17 9.30 am to 12.30 pm Applying nurture as a whole school approach: A framework for self-evaluation professional learning Victoria Quay, Edinburgh As above

For further details or to book a place on any of these courses please email the Education Scotland Inclusion Team and put ‘Inclusion’ in your e-mail subject heading. Don’t forget to specify the course you would like to attend.

A different perspective⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

By Cat Thomson, Senior Development Officer, Enquire

The Young Ambassadors for Inclusion are aged between 12 and 18 and represent 22 of the 32 local authorities in Scotland. The group aims to:

  • Share young people’s views and experiences of inclusion;
  • Raise awareness of Additional Support for Learning with other pupils to reduce stigma and improve understanding;
  • Improve school staffs understanding of inclusion;
  • Work together to develop ways to develop and support inclusive education.

They are supported by Education Scotland, Enquire [the Scottish advice service for additional support for learning] and individual local authority staff.

In June, the young people took their messages about inclusion to the Scottish Cabinet.

“We want to be seen as individuals with our own set of unique strengths and skills.”

These are impressive words from Alistair, one of the Young Ambassadors for Inclusion who met Deputy First Minister and Education Secretary, John Swinney in June to share their views on inclusion and support in school.

During the meeting, 11 members of the group shared findings from their work. They were keen to raise issues they think it is important for policymakers, local authority staff, school leaders, teachers and support staff to hear and reflect on when making decisions about support for pupils with additional support for learning.

One of the first questions the Ambassadors considered was what inclusion means to them. Their comments make for interesting reading. Many of the young people saw inclusion as a positive thing making pupils feeling safe, accepted, and treated equally. Common messages were “everybody [should be] included in education regardless of need”, “being able to work together with a range of people”, “everybody involved, nobody left out” and “not being defined by any difficulties you have”.

A small number of Ambassadors talked about inclusion adding additional pressure to young people but the universal message was how incredibly important it is to young people to feel listened to, understood and supported. Comments included: “It’s good when we are listened to and asked what we need”, and “When staff have an understanding of different additional support needs and can understand certain behaviour it helps them understand why young people may act in a particular way.”

What works less well is when pupils feel excluded or unsupported: “Many class teachers and other staff do not have awareness of additional support needs, what that means for us and how to support in the classroom”, and “Pupils need access to all areas of the school and curriculum.”

A number of pupils wanted to encourage schools to give pupils with additional support needs the same opportunities as other pupils and not to make assumptions about their abilities, highlighting that sometimes trying something and not succeeding is better than not trying.

Key themes

Some of the themes they identified from their work included: raising awareness, friendship and belonging, positive attitude and support.

Raising Awareness

“Whole school awareness of ASN can support much better understanding and reduce stigma and isolation”

“Taking opportunities to share that people are different and you should not make fun of them.”

Ambassadors recommended that all teachers should have training on inclusion and the different types of additional support for learning pupils may have and how this might affect them in school.

They felt more could be done in primary school to raise awareness of additional support for learning and called for zero tolerance of bullying of pupils with additional support needs.

They suggested holding pupil conferences, taking part in national awareness weeks, putting on school assemblies led by pupils, or developing awareness raising days about specific issues such as mental health or LGBT.

Friendship and belonging

“I didn’t really feel part of mainstream school.”

Ambassadors called for schools to help young people feel more confident, build friendships and feel included. Schools should provide opportunities to take part in activities with peers.

Positive Attitudes

“Don’t segregate pupils with needs.”

“It helps to be patient.”

As one Inclusion Ambassador said to John Swinney: “We need to create positive stories about pupils with additional support need rather than focus on the negatives.”

Ambassadors felt schools should focus on raising awareness of the range of reasons a pupil may need support and how this might make a pupil feel in school, while also encouraging a more positive view of additional support needs.

“Supportive teachers in mainstream are crucial”

“Teachers need qualifications to work with pupils with additional support needs and medical needs.”

“Staff off and no replacement really affects learning”

Making it easy for pupils to ask for help and offer the right support

Sharing information about how pupils can ask for help and having supportive and empathetic teachers who can support pupil’s emotional issues was highlighted as helpful to encourage young people to ask for help when they need it.

Ambassadors stressed the importance of schools listening to pupils about the type of support they wanted in school. They also highlighted the impact of crucial support not being available to help them get the most out of school, with many reporting support had been reduced due to budget cuts. Others shared experiences of inconsistent staffing, and highlighted the impact this had on their learning and school experience.

Ambassadors encouraged schools to have a range of options for collected pupils views, including focus groups and questionnaires.

What next?

The Young Ambassadors for Inclusion are planning to create a pledge that schools can use to demonstrate their commitment to inclusion. They will also be involved in developing a support pack for schools, including a short film to raise awareness of inclusion, the range of additional support needs and the impact on pupils and their families.

This article also appears in August’s Children in Scotland magazine.

www.enquire.org.uk @ASLadvice