Tag Archives: images

PicCollage for the Classroom⤴

from @ ICT for Learning & Teaching in Falkirk Schools

Pic⏺Collage – much more than the name might suggest, Pic⏺Collage is a free app which works on multiple platforms including iPads, Android, Windows and Amazon devices. Yes of course it can create collages of multiple images but it can do much more! And it has uses to support across the curriculum in different ways.

Grids

At its most straightforward you can create a collage of multiple images in one single image to illustrate an aspect of learning in an overview.

And Pic⏺Collage provides a range of grid templates from which to choose. Simply open the app, choose “grids”, select your images from your device, select the outline shape/proportion from the size tab, then from Grid tab choose from the range of grid types – note that you can choose from overlapping freestyle or from different numbers of images and relative sizes.

In addition, for any selected grid template, you can click on any single image at a time and adjust the relative proportions/size of each image to reflect how you want the complete collage of images to appear.

The size of the gap between each image (the background), as well as the outline of the entire collage, can be adjusted by using the slider (you can adjust it so there is no background or gap between images). Click on the third tab, background, to choose the colour or pattern which will appear between images and around the outline of the collage.

The Tweet by @MPS_Primary6 used the app to select images to illustrate mood and diplay in a grid template and overlay with text

 

Stickers

For any collage you can add stickers, from speech/thought bubbles to smiley faces to thumbs-up  and more. These stickers can be handy if you have a need to obscure elements of an image, such as to hide faces or to blank out names or other text details. Once placed on a collage a sticker can be moved, rotated or resized.

Text

You can add text to any collage, choosing from a range of typefaces/fonts. You can choose the colour of the letters as well as the colour of the text box (or choose to have no background colour or text box visible). You can choose how to align text within a text box if you choose to show the text box, and choose whether or bot to display an outline in each letter.

See the Tweet below from @MrsOrrCPS for examples of how this app has been used by learners choosing an image or background, then overlaying their self-created poetry text which the image reflects.

Web image search facility

The inbuilt web image search provides the option to easily find images, including animated gifs, to add on top of your collage.

@P7PWPS chose images and backgrounds in the app, and then used the text tool to overlay descriptive words in French

 

Doodle

The doodle option lets you choose the size of the drawn line and the colour of drawing tool. Then you simply draw freehand on top of the collage. Once drawn this drawn image can then be moved, rotated or resized as required.

Animation

Selecting “animation” gives you the option to select from various animations, including moving from side to side or moving into the centre, wiggling or spreading and more. The animation applies to all of the elements of the collage. These animated collages can be shared online via website or social media where the animations will then be seen.

Teacher’s Corner

Pic⏺Collage has a Teacher’s Corner area of their blog full of ideas about how this app can be used in the classroom to support learning. Head over to https://blog.piccollage.com/category/teachers-corner/ to check it out.

Look at the Tweets below shared by schools about the ways they have used this app:

So how have you used this app? Do share in the comments here how you have used the app in your classroom

Google Image Search on iOS⤴

from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

TL:DR I’ve found a link that leads to google image search for  images labeled for noncommercial reuse. This is handy on iOS where it is hard to get to the Usage Rights Filter, here is the link: https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=&lr=&safe=active&hl=en-GB&tbs=sur:f&tbm=isch.

Coming back to the classroom after 9 years I find I am still interested in searching for images and copyright. It still seems to be as hard to get young children to understand the problem and harder to understand and carry out attribution.

On my classes blog I link to various places to search for images with some advice on attribution. I include my FlickrCC Stampr tool which can simplify the attribution.

As well as the problem with attribution there is the ever present temptation just to search google. This is made worse by the fact that the Search Tools displayed on iOS lack the Usage Rights popup.

So I was interested in the link I saw today: How to find Google images with reuse licenses on an iPad iOS – Using Technology Better.

Unfortunately this method was described as a hack and took 6 steps to get to the advanced search and the usage rights pop up.

So I though I might have a search for the url parameters1 involved in a search with the Usage rights displayed.

There are quite a lot of parameters and although searching google for a list provides some these seem to be both undocumented and changeable:

You can expect that a lot of this will change. The reason why Google themselves do not provide any guidance or documentation on these parameters is probably that they want to retain full freedom to change how they work. You can expect that some will be removed, some will be added, and others will give a different result than before.

from: Google Search URL Request Parameters | DETECTED Which give a lot of details, but not the one I wanted.

So I went through the process in the Using Technology Better post and copied the url. I then started deleting the parameters until I found the ones that would produce the right kind of search:

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=&lr=&safe=active&hl=en-GB&tbs=sur:f&tbm=isch

The tbm=isch bit makes it an image search, the tbs=sur:f seems to set the usage rights to Labeled for noncommercial reuse.

So you can now give pupils on iOS a direct link to search for images that labeled for noncommercial reuse.

Featured Image: found searching Flickr for search with no known copyright restrictions: Image from page 211 of “Bulletin” (1961-1962) by Internet Archive Book Images No known copyright restrictions

1. The paramaters are the bits in the url after ? for example ?q=bus&safe=active, makes a search for a bus safe.

ImageOptim⤴

from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

imageOptim

I know we are in the days of lots of free space, but it is worth remembering when blogging (or making webpages) shrinking images is worth doing for your visitors.

I don’t always do it, but today as I updates a Glow Blogs Help page, I saved nearly half the space by using, ImageOptim — better Save for Web.

There are other tools, but this one is free & open source, works on a Mac, but lists and links to windows & linux tools.

Blurring to save face – hiding photograph elements⤴

from @ ICT for Teaching & Learning in Falkirk Primary Schools

There are occasions when a great photograph which you’ve taken, which shows exactly the activity you want to share online, has a part of the picture which stops you doing so. There can be several reasons, whether a piece of text appears in the photograph which might share information which wouldn’t want to be shared (such as a house number, car registration number, a name badge or even a document being held by someone in the photograph); or faces of individuals who would not want their faces to appear online.

There are many free online tools which let you upload the photograph and apply a blur filter  (click here for a host of these tools). While you can blur an entire photograph to  illustrate the activity you are sharing on a website or blogpost, wouldn’t it be good to just blur the part of the photograph causing you the concern?

PhotoHide is a free online tool which lets you select faces or other elements of a photograph and very quickly blur these parts of the photograph and save a copy. You simply upload the photograph, drag the computer mouse over the feature to be blurred, click “hide” to blur that part and preview it, repeat as necessary on any other part of the photograph, then save to you computer. That’s it! Anything uploaded is deleted from their servers once you have completed the operation.