Tag Archives: ICT

Getting Going with iPads in the classroom⤴

from @ ICT for Learning & Teaching in Falkirk Schools

So you’ve got iPads in your classroom? Where to start? Have a look at the Sway presentation below for a guide to some help to getting going with using an iPad in the classroom to support learning and teaching.

 

And if you’re wondering how iPads are being used in classrooms then have a look at the Sway presentation which collates some of the Tweets shared by Falkirk schools about how iPads are being used to support learning and teaching across the curriculum at all stages.

Creating a Multi-user Collaborative Presentation with Microsoft PowerPoint Online⤴

from @ ICT for Learning & Teaching in Falkirk Schools

The go-to presentation-creation tool for many teachers and pupils is PowerPoint. So as your pupils are already familiar with using Microsoft PowerPoint then consider using Microsoft PowerPoint Online available to all Glow users in Scottish schools as part of Microsoft Office 365. PowerPoint Online is available anytime, anywhere with online access so can be accessed at home or at school.

You can upload an existing PowerPoint presentation from your computer or other device to your OneDrive in Office 365 in Glow (and then edit online from then onwards) or you can simply log into your OneDrive and create a new PowerPoint presentation completely online. You can choose to keep the presentation private to you in your own OneDrive (the online cloud storage with massive capacity available to every Glow user in Scottish schools). Or you can, at any time, choose to make a PowerPoint Online presentation visible to other users of your choice – and you can choose whether to allow them to just be able to view it or show it without being able to make changes, or you can give other users the access rights to be able to jointly edit the presentation with you, either at exactly the same time as you or at different times to suit each user.

Have a look at the Sway presentation here for a step-by-step guide for learners to create a PowerPoint presentation in PowerPoint Online in their OneDrive in Microsoft office 365 via Glow and to share this with other Glow users to be able to jointly edit the same presentation.

 

The link below take you to a classroom activity for pupils to use PowerPoint Online to create (jointly with other pupils on different devices at the same time) a robot character. The step-by-step guide to this activity can be adapted for other curricular-specific tasks which would benefit from a group of pupils working collaboratively on the same PowerPoint presentation, whether simultaneously or at different times:

Passing the Power of Powerpoint

Listening to Aaron’s microcast⤴

from @ wwwd – John's World Wide Wall Display

Read Write Microcast #008 – Limits of Automation by Aaron DavisAaron Davis from collect.readwriterespond.com
Confident – the connecting of the dots and capitalising on different possibilities. Essential Elements of Digital Literacies In this microcast, I reflect on automating technology and wonder if there is a limit to how far we should go. Further reading: When Automation Goes Awry https://col...

The dilemma in supporting schools in using technology: Give out fish or teach to fish. Before I came back to school I was faced with this problem more than once.

What I would say now, in hindsight, is that if you make the solution yourself it adds risk. I thoroughly enjoy making simple scripts and workflows, but these are generally fragile. You might end up with more long term support than you thought, or worse raising and dashing expectations.

In my part-time life I am still supporting Glow Blogs. Quite often it would be easier to fix something in response to a request for help. More often now I try to write instructions instead. I can add these to the help and point the next problem a those.

I need to get back to microcasting. I enjoyed listen to this on my commute. The focus on one subject in the short form podcast is valuable.

Teach Languages Conference, 10 February 2018⤴

from @ My Languages


Teach Languages 2018
Teach Languages is a conference and exhibition for language teachers organised by Linguascope. The 2018 edition will take place on Saturday 10th February 2018.

Programme
The focus for the 2018 edition will be the teaching of grammar. Speakers include Sue CaveJuliet ParkIsabelle Jones and Judith Rifeser. To view a printable version of the full programme, click here.

Venue
Teach Languages is taking place at the Rich Mix Cultural Foundation in East London. Rich Mix is conveniently located just outside Shoreditch High Street station (Overground) and within walking distance of Liverpool Street station. There is also plenty of free parking spaces around the venue at the weekend. To help you find your way, we’ve produced a printable map for you to download. For travel details, check out the Rich Mix website

A day pass gives you access to any sessions and the exhibition area for the whole day. It also includes your delegate pack, refreshments and lunch.
The cost of a day pass is:
• £60 (£50 + VAT)
• £48 (£40 + VAT) if booked and paid online
• FREE* for Linguascope subscribers
*You will find your redemption code in the Staffroom section of the Linguascope website, under "Training Events"). Note that free tickets are subject to a £10 deposit (fully refundable if you attend on the day) to ensure that no place is wasted.

Sessions:
Creative Grammar: Developing Language Learner's independence • Isabelle Jones
With the new GCSE in sight and the need to produce writing in exam conditions, teaching and learning grammar has never been so important. This session will aim to introduce delegates to a range of strategies to develop the learning of grammar creatively from key stage 2 in order to produce independent and successful language learners ready for GCSE and beyond.

Grammar Moves • Sue Cave
Activities for developing grammatical understanding will be demonstrated. They have been tried and tested in Key Stage 2, however, they could equally be suitable for other age groups. Each activity will relate to the KS2 targets of the MFL Programme of Study. The emphasis will be on progression from word to sentence level both orally and written. Most of the activities include either movement or a kinaesthetic element and are designed to engage learners actively and creatively. All the examples will be in French but can be adapted for most languages.

The Final Countdown: Revision Revisited • Juliet Park
This session will focus on the lead up to the new exam, how we can help our students prepare for the new exam-style questions and be ready to apply grammar and vocabulary independently and spontaneously. This session will show effective ways to build exam-style practise into your lessons and ensure that students are getting sufficient exposure and practise both in the classroom and independently to help maximise their performance.

Grammar|in|con|text: Teaching grammar through film and other authentic resources in the TL • Judith Rifeser
The teaching of grammar, the use of cultural resources as well as the teaching in the target language are all key elements of the MFL agenda. But how can we make our teaching ARPS: authentic, relevant, purposeful and stimulating, whilst still ensuring students are getting to grips with complex grammatical structures and rules? In this session, we’ll explore examples of good practice, in particular through film, to teach grammar in context, focussing on developing their grammatical awareness and explicit grammar knowledge in the target language, whilst still allowing students to improve all their skills and learn grammar in a fun and motivating way.


More Information and online booking:  http://www.teachlang.com/  See you there!

Credit where credit is due on #PedagooFriday⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

You’re probably aware of our end-of-the-week hashtag #PedagooFriday.  The idea is to create a space on Twitter where teachers can share a positive experience from their classroom and, perhaps, develop a happier tone at the end of the week.  It’s been quite a week.  Nuff said. As this week’s Duty Moderator, I noticed that several […]

Google Expeditions⤴

from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

IMG_7357.jpeg

In early October my school had a visit from Google Expeditions. I’d been contacted to see if I would be interested and jumped at the chance.

Google Expeditions are a 3D VR ‘experience’ using google cardboard. I’d tried a few mobile apps using cardboard before but not in a classroom setting.

The plan was we would choose Expeditions that would fit into our learning.

On the day Kostas from Google turned up in Banton having traveled on public transport with the whole kit in a backpack. This consisted of one tablet, one router, a set of android phones with a google cardboard for each phone.

Expeditions are a set of several 3D VR ‘images’ that can be looked around. The images are broadcast from the tablet ( or a phone) to other devices on the local network. The Tablet is handled by the ‘leader’ the phones by the ‘explorers’. The leader controls which image/space the explorers see. The leader’s non-3D view includes some notes and discussion points.

table leader view

The devices need to be connected to the same network but they do not need to be online. The scenes are ‘served’ from the tablet. The tablet does need to be online at some point to download the scenes in preparation.

When in a space the explorers can look around by turning their heads or bodies. Moving forward and backwards has no effect.

The leader cannot control where the explores look in a scene but double tapping will show the explorers an arrow pointing to the object tapped (we saw that explorers would always follow these arrows).

We had chosen a couple of Expeditions that would fit with out learning, but did have the chance to explore quite a few.

in the box

The pupils were very engaged immediately, the images are surprisingly ‘hyper real’ and the experience of turning round or just moving your head was delightful.

We collated some pupil responses on the class blog: Around the World in a Cardboard Box.

I’d chosen the spaces we looked at at fairly short notice, one did not really fit with my expectations the other was linked to a topic we had not then started. So for the point of view of linking into the learning and teaching I hadn’t planed well enough. From the point of view of exploring potential new technology and giving the pupils a glimpse of the near future.

I’d also feel that the resources might be a bit more valuable after the initial excitement had died down and the pupils used the system more than once.

So how would we use this past an exciting but brief test. Although the kit is relative inexpensive a class set would still be an major resource for even a large school.

I suppose it could be a share resource for a group of schools or local authority.

I wonder too if it could be used on a smaller scale, with less devices. At the end of last month I was talking to Will Tuft on Radio #EDutalk about ‘The immersive classroom’, this involves setting up classroom experiences, for example the aftermath of a hurricane, with props and tasks. I wonder could the cardboard be part of some such class. For example a group of ‘divers’ could take it in turns to put on the googles and explore the sea.

It could also just be used by a few children as a time.

I wonder if as well as the obvious exploration angle if it would be a rich resource for writing.

All in all an interesting experience, it will be interesting to see how this type of technology develops.

    iPad Glow Tip⤴

    from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

    shortcut-featured

    At the weekend during pedagoo muckle there was a mini TeachMeet. Everyones name was in a bowel and there was a series of random 2 minute talks. I though I was prepared with this tip. In the event I was quite glad I didn’t get picked all the people who got picked had two minutes of great ideas, as opposed to a wee tip.

    I did mention it to one or two folk at my conversation and it was well received so I though it would be work posting.

    One of the minor hassles I’ve been having with Glow and iPads is multiple logons. Some of the MS apps seem to get themselves in a state of confusion, requiring pupils to log on frequently, and more than once. This is a particular pain if you work in Word, save to Onedrive and then upload that file through the browser. I’d like this to be a thoughtless and painless process for my class but it is not. This is compounded by the fact you need to put a glow email address into an MicroSoft iPad app, this them loads the RM Unify logon where you need to use your glow username and password. Given you can use your glow email in place of your username this make the tip even more useful.

    iOS has a text replacement function. You can type a shortcut and the predictive text will offer the expansion to insert.

    You set these up in the Setting App, General-> Keyboard- Text Replacement, the phrase would be your glow email, the shortcut something memorable, not part of a real word. We used gw and initials, so mine is gwjj.

    Here is a gif showing how much easier it it to log on with a shortcut.

    shortcut-gwjj

    As a bonus, some of the pupils in my class added other shortcuts, for example d: for define: which hlps find the meaning of words in google.