Tag Archives: ICT

Google Expeditions⤴

from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

IMG_7357.jpeg

In early October my school had a visit from Google Expeditions. I’d been contacted to see if I would be interested and jumped at the chance.

Google Expeditions are a 3D VR ‘experience’ using google cardboard. I’d tried a few mobile apps using cardboard before but not in a classroom setting.

The plan was we would choose Expeditions that would fit into our learning.

On the day Kostas from Google turned up in Banton having traveled on public transport with the whole kit in a backpack. This consisted of one tablet, one router, a set of android phones with a google cardboard for each phone.

Expeditions are a set of several 3D VR ‘images’ that can be looked around. The images are broadcast from the tablet ( or a phone) to other devices on the local network. The Tablet is handled by the ‘leader’ the phones by the ‘explorers’. The leader controls which image/space the explorers see. The leader’s non-3D view includes some notes and discussion points.

table leader view

The devices need to be connected to the same network but they do not need to be online. The scenes are ‘served’ from the tablet. The tablet does need to be online at some point to download the scenes in preparation.

When in a space the explorers can look around by turning their heads or bodies. Moving forward and backwards has no effect.

The leader cannot control where the explores look in a scene but double tapping will show the explorers an arrow pointing to the object tapped (we saw that explorers would always follow these arrows).

We had chosen a couple of Expeditions that would fit with out learning, but did have the chance to explore quite a few.

in the box

The pupils were very engaged immediately, the images are surprisingly ‘hyper real’ and the experience of turning round or just moving your head was delightful.

We collated some pupil responses on the class blog: Around the World in a Cardboard Box.

I’d chosen the spaces we looked at at fairly short notice, one did not really fit with my expectations the other was linked to a topic we had not then started. So for the point of view of linking into the learning and teaching I hadn’t planed well enough. From the point of view of exploring potential new technology and giving the pupils a glimpse of the near future.

I’d also feel that the resources might be a bit more valuable after the initial excitement had died down and the pupils used the system more than once.

So how would we use this past an exciting but brief test. Although the kit is relative inexpensive a class set would still be an major resource for even a large school.

I suppose it could be a share resource for a group of schools or local authority.

I wonder too if it could be used on a smaller scale, with less devices. At the end of last month I was talking to Will Tuft on Radio #EDutalk about ‘The immersive classroom’, this involves setting up classroom experiences, for example the aftermath of a hurricane, with props and tasks. I wonder could the cardboard be part of some such class. For example a group of ‘divers’ could take it in turns to put on the googles and explore the sea.

It could also just be used by a few children as a time.

I wonder if as well as the obvious exploration angle if it would be a rich resource for writing.

All in all an interesting experience, it will be interesting to see how this type of technology develops.

    iPad Glow Tip⤴

    from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

    shortcut-featured

    At the weekend during pedagoo muckle there was a mini TeachMeet. Everyones name was in a bowel and there was a series of random 2 minute talks. I though I was prepared with this tip. In the event I was quite glad I didn’t get picked all the people who got picked had two minutes of great ideas, as opposed to a wee tip.

    I did mention it to one or two folk at my conversation and it was well received so I though it would be work posting.

    One of the minor hassles I’ve been having with Glow and iPads is multiple logons. Some of the MS apps seem to get themselves in a state of confusion, requiring pupils to log on frequently, and more than once. This is a particular pain if you work in Word, save to Onedrive and then upload that file through the browser. I’d like this to be a thoughtless and painless process for my class but it is not. This is compounded by the fact you need to put a glow email address into an MicroSoft iPad app, this them loads the RM Unify logon where you need to use your glow username and password. Given you can use your glow email in place of your username this make the tip even more useful.

    iOS has a text replacement function. You can type a shortcut and the predictive text will offer the expansion to insert.

    You set these up in the Setting App, General-> Keyboard- Text Replacement, the phrase would be your glow email, the shortcut something memorable, not part of a real word. We used gw and initials, so mine is gwjj.

    Here is a gif showing how much easier it it to log on with a shortcut.

    shortcut-gwjj

    As a bonus, some of the pupils in my class added other shortcuts, for example d: for define: which hlps find the meaning of words in google.

    Parallel Reading with the Parallel Books app-A Way into Literature and Translation?⤴

    from @ My Languages

    Matt Thomas contacted me a while ago to trial his Parallel Books app. The principle is simple, you get a text that is in the public domain, you get a good translation and you use the app the read both texts side-by-side.
    Easy? Well... Thank you to Matt for telling us about the story behind the development of this great app that is just fantastic to get our higher ability pupils to dare reading in a foreign language just as literature and translation have re-appeared in the new GCSE specifications. The books are well known classics so although the texts are complex, it gives pupils a sense of confidence as it is known territory.

     
    "I started making Parallel Books a couple of years ago, although it was only released in December last year. I've done it at the same time as been the main care giver for 2 toddlers, so it's been lots of nights programming from their bedtimes till midnight!

    You were asking about the reason I started. I was wanting to challenge myself to make a high quality app, so I was looking for ideas.

    I spent my whole adult life as a professional musician with a popular band in NZ. When touring Europe one time, I met my wife, who was the singer in another band on the same circuit.

    We both ended up leaving our bands and working together playing music. I moved to Switzerland, and found that I needed to learn some new languages!

    I have a number of English speaking friends here, and one day one of them told me how he was reading Roger Federer's biography, and that he had bought it in both English and German to read at the same time.

    That's when the lightbulb went off in my head, that I could make an app that makes this process easier. It's a great method to practice a new language, but keeping the two books in sync is a bit of a pain, and I realised that I could make this part of it easier within an app.

    It turns out that it is actually quite complicated to program this, and there is a lot going on behind the scene to make it appear so simple and user friendly on the surface.

    Currently all books in Parallel Books are free. This means that I can only use either texts that are public domain (copyright free) or that I acquire permission to use.

     
    If you know of any good Spanish texts I could include, do let me know! Essentially the author AND the translator have to have been dead for 70 years in order for them to be out of copyright.

    I'm also interested in finding very beginner level texts I can use, which have also proven allusive."
     
    Anything else you need to know about "Parallel Books"? Oh yes... It is free :)

    App store: https://itunes.apple.com/app/parallel-books/id1045596664?mt=8
    Facebook page (includes screen shots and demo video): http://www.facebook.com/parallelbooksapp
    Twitter: https://twitter.com/parallelbooks
    Website: http://www.parallelbooks.com

    Parallel Reading with the Parallel Books app-a Way into Literature and Translation?⤴

    from @ My Languages

    Matt Thomas contacted a while ago to trial his Parallel Books app. The principle is simple, you get a text that is in the public domain, you get a good translation and you use the app the read both texts side-by-side.
    Easy? Well... Thank you to Matt for telling us about the story behind the development of this great app that is just fantastic to get our higher ability pupils to dare reading in a foreign language just as literature and translation have re-appeared in the new GCSE specifications. The books are well known classics so although the texts are complex, it gives pupils a sense of confidence as it is known territory.

     
    "I started making Parallel Books a couple of years ago, although it was only released in December last year. I've done it at the same time as been the main care giver for 2 toddlers, so it's been lots of nights programming from their bedtimes till midnight!

    You were asking about the reason I started. I was wanting to challenge myself to make a high quality app, so I was looking for ideas.

    I spent my whole adult life as a professional musician with a popular band in NZ. When touring Europe one time, I met my wife, who was the singer in another band on the same circuit.

    We both ended up leaving our bands and working together playing music. I moved to Switzerland, and found that I needed to learn some new languages!

    I have a number of English speaking friends here, and one day one of them told me how he was reading Roger Federer's biography, and that he had bought it in both English and German to read at the same time.

    That's when the lightbulb went off in my head, that I could make an app that makes this process easier. It's a great method to practice a new language, but keeping the two books in sync is a bit of a pain, and I realised that I could make this part of it easier within an app.

    It turns out that it is actually quite complicated to program this, and there is a lot going on behind the scene to make it appear so simple and user friendly on the surface.

    Currently all books in Parallel Books are free. This means that I can only use either texts that are public domain (copyright free) or that I acquire permission to use.

     
    If you know of any good Spanish texts I could include, do let me know! Essentially the author AND the translator have to have been dead for 70 years in order for them to be out of copyright.

    I'm also interested in finding very beginner level texts I can use, which have also proven allusive."
     
    Anything else you need to know about "Parallel Books"? Oh yes... It is free :)

    App store: https://itunes.apple.com/app/parallel-books/id1045596664?mt=8
    Facebook page (includes screen shots and demo video): http://www.facebook.com/parallelbooksapp
    Twitter: https://twitter.com/parallelbooks
    Website: http://www.parallelbooks.com

    Parallel Reading with the Parallel Books app-A Way into Literature and Translation?⤴

    from @ My Languages

    Matt Thomas contacted me a while ago to trial his Parallel Books app. The principle is simple, you get a text that is in the public domain, you get a good translation and you use the app the read both texts side-by-side.
    Easy? Well... Thank you to Matt for telling us about the story behind the development of this great app that is just fantastic to get our higher ability pupils to dare reading in a foreign language just as literature and translation have re-appeared in the new GCSE specifications. The books are well known classics so although the texts are complex, it gives pupils a sense of confidence as it is known territory.

     
    "I started making Parallel Books a couple of years ago, although it was only released in December last year. I've done it at the same time as been the main care giver for 2 toddlers, so it's been lots of nights programming from their bedtimes till midnight!

    You were asking about the reason I started. I was wanting to challenge myself to make a high quality app, so I was looking for ideas.

    I spent my whole adult life as a professional musician with a popular band in NZ. When touring Europe one time, I met my wife, who was the singer in another band on the same circuit.

    We both ended up leaving our bands and working together playing music. I moved to Switzerland, and found that I needed to learn some new languages!

    I have a number of English speaking friends here, and one day one of them told me how he was reading Roger Federer's biography, and that he had bought it in both English and German to read at the same time.

    That's when the lightbulb went off in my head, that I could make an app that makes this process easier. It's a great method to practice a new language, but keeping the two books in sync is a bit of a pain, and I realised that I could make this part of it easier within an app.

    It turns out that it is actually quite complicated to program this, and there is a lot going on behind the scene to make it appear so simple and user friendly on the surface.

    Currently all books in Parallel Books are free. This means that I can only use either texts that are public domain (copyright free) or that I acquire permission to use.

     
    If you know of any good Spanish texts I could include, do let me know! Essentially the author AND the translator have to have been dead for 70 years in order for them to be out of copyright.

    I'm also interested in finding very beginner level texts I can use, which have also proven allusive."
     
    Anything else you need to know about "Parallel Books"? Oh yes... It is free :)

    App store: https://itunes.apple.com/app/parallel-books/id1045596664?mt=8
    Facebook page (includes screen shots and demo video): http://www.facebook.com/parallelbooksapp
    Twitter: https://twitter.com/parallelbooks
    Website: http://www.parallelbooks.com

    Engaging pupils with iMovie trailers⤴

    from @ Pedagoo.org

    Following a challenging morning, we were bracing ourselves for the afternoon session in our nurture base. We support the most vulnerable children in the authority. We base our practice on the nurture principles and the Boxall profile and the children’s mental, social and emotional well-being is a priority for us. Or, as I’ve seen on […]

    Bringing Children’s Rights into the Classroom [Scotland only]⤴

    from @ Pedagoo.org

    Are you looking for a way to incorporate Getting it Right for Every Child into your Classroom? Let’s face it, it can be a puzzle incorporating the rights and principles of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child into your classroom practice. Child Rights Launchpad by Unicef UK aims to help you do […]

    ICT and Languages Conference 2016 #ililc6⤴

    from @ Pedagoo.org

      It was not without a little trepidation that I headed to Dorking from Glasgow for my first #ililc event hosted by @joedale and @helenmyers at Ashcombe School Language College, sponsored by Sanako making it a free event for the first time, hence why I made the effort. Would my two tablets and smartphone connect, download […]

    ‘Animal Me’ – SDS’s new digital offer for young learners⤴

    from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

    Skills Development Scotland’s (SDS) work on a suite of digSDS-AnimalNoBG-02-Teddyital resources to support career learning in P5-P7 classrooms is moving at pace. SDS Digital Services Programme Manager Derek Hawthorne says all schools will have access to the resources by August 2016:

    “We’ve been in classrooms across Scotland carrying out testing throughout the development of our new digital resources.

    Aimed at primary 5 to 7 pupils, teachers will be able to access a range of support materials to aid delivery in the classroom as well as digital tools for pupils to use.

    The resources are part of our wider work in support of the Career Education Standard and the expansion of our careers advice services in secondary schools, supporting the outcomes of Developing the Young Workforce and aligned to Curriculum for Excellence.

    The tools and resources are part of My World of Work, our award winning careers information and advice web service.

    My World of Work is packed with advice, tools, resources and information and is already widely used in secondary schools, colleges and beyond. It also supports the work of SDS Careers Advisers across Scotland.

    My World of Work has a specific partner area which includes resources developed with teachers for education professionals to use with their pupils to develop their career management skills (CMS).Homepage 1

    Getting started

    Teacher registration is through My World of Work as normal.

    Ticking the box as a primary school teacher at the point of registration and adding your school takes you to your own account page.

    Here you’ll be able to access the full suite of resources and register your pupils as well as track progress and access reports.

    Registering pupils is then an easy process, just add names and Scottish candidate numbers.

    One teacher can register multiple classes, and ownership can be transferred so when a class moves up a year their new teacher has access to their accounts.   It works too if a pupil moves school.

    Once pupils are added, they then log on with their name and a quick four digit code.

    The next step is straight on to using the tools to build up their personal profile and develop their career management skills.

     

    The tools

    There will be three fun, interactive and easy-to-use tools for pupils.

    My interests:

    • a tool that looks at what a pupil likes to do, their interests in and outside of school.
    • a series of simple statements like ‘I like to spend time reading books’ or ‘making cakes’ or ‘playing video games’ which pupils click on
    • results match up with different job types, with the opportunity for pupils to click through and find out more.

    Animal me is:

    • a personality quiz where pupils can find out what animal matches their personality, results include koala bear, eagle, clownfish or tawny owl.
    • A memorable way for pupils to find out information about their character traits and the kinds of jobs that could suit their personality type.
    • based around the Myers-Briggs personality principles and can also indicate how a young person learns or handles stress.

    The third tool, Skills builder, is the most in-depth, it:

    • links directly to the I Can statements in the Career Education Standard, and will provide a way to evidence and report on skills development, attainment and profiling.
    • allows teachers to set pupils, groups or classes an I Can statement to work to.
    • is designed to be used on a day-to-day basis pupils can enter activities they’ve undertaken inside and outside of school, measuring themselves on a star rating against the top skills they think they’ve used for that activity.
    • has progress bars appear on pupil account page
    • grows with the pupil, building a personalised skills profile

    Moving on up

    We hope these tools will mean a far richer and more personalised career management skills experience for pupils, as well as a thoroughly useful resource for teachers.

    As the resources are part of My World of Work, there is huge opportunity for pupils as they move on from primary school and begin to work with SDS careers advisers at the primary 7/S1 transition phase. The tools also line up with existing versions on My World of Work which they’ll be using through secondary school and beyond.Teachers and pupils have been involved in design and testing every step of the way, and will continue to help us out right up to August and beyond.  This month we’re hoping to open up an early version of the resources so we can get as much feedback as possible on its development ahead of the new school year.

    Keep up to date on that and all the latest developments by following us on Twitter @skillsdevscot and @mywowscotland and Facebook at facebook.com/myworldofwork and of course here on Education Scotland’s website.