Tag Archives: food

Food for Thought Education Fund⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Food for Thought Education Fund

Food for Thought Phase 5 application

The Food for Thought Education Fund gives financial support to develop Food and Health as a context for learning. The fund aims to improve practitioner confidence in providing progressive, high quality learning experiences which help to embed food education into the ethos of the establishment. It also provides an opportunity to plan and implement learning experiences which build sustainability and capacity for future development.

Now in its fifth year, the Fund allows Local Authority Schools and Early Learning and Childcare settings to apply for grants of up to £3000 to develop projects that support the aims of the Fund. (Note – ASN establishments in the independent sector are also eligible to apply). Establishments may apply individually or as part of a cluster of schools from their education authority.

It is essential that food based projects include a business or community link . Business in the Community Scotland is a partner in the Food for Thought Fund and can help establishments to find a business/community link if help is required.

What Are We Looking for This Year?

Scottish Government’s aspiration that Scotland is a Good Food Nation, means a country where people from every walk of life take pride and pleasure in, and benefit from, the food they buy, serve, and eat day by day. It also means that :

  • It is the norm for Scots to take a keen interest in their food, knowing what constitutes good food, valuing  it and seeking it out whenever they can.
  • People who serve and sell food (including schools) are committed to serving and selling good food.
  • Everyone in Scotland has ready access to the healthy, nutritious food they need.
  • Dietary-related diseases are in decline, as is the environmental impact of our food consumption.
  • Scottish producers ensure that what they produce is increasingly healthy and environmentally sound
  • Food companies are a thriving feature of the economy and places where people want to work.
  • Other countries look to Scotland to learn how to become a Good Food Nation.’

This year, we are particularly interested in bids which will to contribute to this vision by:

  • ensuring learners have gained understanding about food education and can apply that knowledge and understanding, including a knowledge of the wide range of careers that are available in the Food and Drinks industry;
  • improving outcomes for learners in ways which seek to eliminate the inequity that currently exists amongst learners from different backgrounds and from particular vulnerable groups;
  • demonstrate an impact on learners, with learners being able to reflect on their knowledge of food and associated issues;

In this phase, we also ask that projects incorporate some or all of the following themes:

  • Developing the Young Workforce
  • STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths)
  • Inequity / Attainment Gap
  • Digital Learning
  • Progressive Interdisciplinary Learning
  • Learning for Sustainability
  • Outdoor Learning
  • Working with Parents/Community

Projects may also relate to national events and/or Government initiatives including :

Fund PartnersEducation Scotland is building on its strong partnership with Scottish Government with a continued commitment to high quality learning in health and wellbeing, including food education, across educational establishments in Scotland.

Business in the Community Scotland (BiTCS) brings together businesses and partner organisations across sectors to more effectively play their role in a stronger, fairer, wealthier, healthier, and greener Scotland.

In order to enhance skills for learning, life and work it is essential that you work in partnership with a business for this funding. BiTCS’s role in the Food for Thought Fund will be to help schools to link to a business or community organisation that can fulfil this role for the fund. These partners are not required to be a food based business/community organisation. Schools can also work with existing partners or create their own new partnerships. Securing a financial contribution from this partner is not mandatory; however it may be beneficial to your project if you were able to find additional income or ‘in kind’ funding to develop your project.

The Scottish Government is committed to ensuring all schools in Scotland embed food education through the implementation of Curriculum for Excellence, and the Schools (Health Promotion and Nutrition) (Scotland) Act 2007. The Government supports good quality learning and teaching around food through funding a number of stakeholders to engage and work with schools.

Application Details

Food for Thought Phase 5 application

 To apply for Food for Thought Phase 5 funding, please complete the attached application form to arrive by 14.00 on Wednesday 31st May 2017.   Examples of completed application forms from earlier phases are housed in the ‘Resources’ section of the Food for Thought Glow Newsfeed . (Glow log-in required)

Practitioners from previous phases have also shared photographs, stories and information about their projects through the newsfeed conversation.

A Glow Meet has been organised for Tuesday 25th April at 3.45pm and this will be an opportunity to ask questions about the application process or the project you are planning. If you would like to join me, Sign up here.

Please send completed application forms to :

Foodforthought@educationscotland.gsi.gov.uk

Interactive Eatwell Guide⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Food Standards Scotland is proud to have launched the new Interactive Eatwell Guide today. This teaching resource is designed to show the balance of food groups required for a healthy diet. peers.

eatwell-guidedecember

The Interactive Eatwell Guide

Use our interactive Eatwell Guide tool to teach your class how to get a balance of healthier and more sustainable food.  It will help you teach about the different food groups and the proportions of each one we should all be eating, in a fun and interactive way, and at the same time will deliver Curriculum for Excellence Experiences and Outcomes.  There is more information on the food groups within the resource.

Please note: this resource is designed primarily for use in a classroom environment and will work best on Smart Boards and iPads. It also works on desktops and laptops but please ensure that your screen is set to full screen (go to View and Full Screen).

Supporting information

The Eatwell Guide now replaces the eatwell plate as the main tool showing you a healthy balanced diet. It shows the proportions of the foods that make up a healthy diet. The proportions of food groups have been updated to take into account the new dietary recommendations for more fibre and less sugar.

Contact Lynsey.Gray@fss.scot for further assistance on using this interactive tool or Tanya.Olmeda-Hodge@fss.scot for more information on educational resources.

International School Meals Day Competition⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Why not take part in a competition for children and young people to enter to help decide the theme for next year’s International School Meals Day?

Your school or class could take part during Scottish School Meals Week 31st October – 4th November 2016.

https://blogs.glowscotland.org.uk/glowblogs/eslb/2016/10/13/scottish-school-meals-week-31st-october-4th-november/

The flyer/poster is attached, and it would be helpful if you could please distribute it as widely as possible within your school, learning centre and community.

international-school-meals-day

ismd-2017-comp-flier

There are three options to vote / choose:
• Food that reflects your heritage, culture or traditions
• Recipes that help make the most of the food you have at hand
• Completely open to suggestions!

There is a closing date of 7 November – and the chance to win an Amazon voucher!

 

Scottish School Meals Week 31st October – 4th November⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Scottish School Meals Week

31st October – 4th November 2016

scottish-school-meals-week-2016

Each day will have a different food focus. Please see attached for further information.

scottish-school-meals-week-31-10-16

Planning on joining in?

Share your story with @EducationScot @SchoolMeals using #scotmealsweek #FoodEdFriday

Catering colleagues in schools will also have details regarding the week long celebration.

Monday : Scottish School Cook of the Year 2016, Maria Millar’s menu; delicious chicken enchiladas & coleslaw, followed by strawberry cheesecake.

What can you do? Talk about the journey of food in Scotland, undertake taste tests, create and make your own recipes, keep a food diary.

Tuesday : Meat Free Day : school meals will include Quorn based recipes meeting school meal standards such as Quorn mince in a spicy tomato sauce or Quorn tikka masala.

What can you do?  Discuss nutritional needs through exploring different dietary requirements. Taste test the meat free option offered in the school dining hall.

Wednesday : The Great Scottish Bake Off. Does your school cook have what it takes to join the best in Scotland for a bake off? Information and nominations can be found here; https://www.unileverfoodsolutions.co.uk/menu-support/baking-in-schools/big-school-bake-off-scotland.html

Make sure you nominate them no later than Friday 21st October!

What can you do?  Host your own class bake off with catering colleagues as your judges.

Thursday : Big Brakes Scot Pot Challenge.

What can you do? Can  learners  design a one pot meal containing locally sourced ingredients?

Friday : Charity Day:  Supporting Social Bitehttp://social-bite.co.uk/  or your own school nominated charity.

What can you do? Keep safe and hygienic when preparing food for a special school cafe event.

 

Food Education News September 2016⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Please find attached up to date food education news that may be of interest to you .

Food Health news SEPTEMBER 2016food for thought pic

Got good news to share around food education?

Join our #foodedfriday campaign. Share your stories and pictures on a Friday linking in with @EducationScot and any of your business partners.

Also..

Join our **NEW** Health & Wellbeing Yammer on Glow group to discuss food education and        other HWB organisers. It couldn’t be easier to join in the conversation.

HWB logo

  • Download YAMMER onto your mobile device.
  • Login using your Glow username and password.
  • Join the National Health & Wellbeing Community
  • Follow this easy guide to navigate around the conversation and share learning with national colleagues.

Three snacks and out⤴

from @ blethers

I found myself, in a procrastinating moment, leafing through a leaflet from the Co-op, a Christmas leaflet promising all manner of festive treats that could readily be bought or whipped up using a range of Co-op products. I was lured to check out the helpful little labels at the foot of each recipe - you know, the ones with the 'traffic-light' system of grading content of fat, salt, sugar etc.

I suppose I was thinking of the disturbing news the other day that doctors no longer know what the average healthy weight of an 8-year old is because almost all children in Scotland are overweight or obese. It seems that the adult population is also heading for the buffers fully laden, as it were, and the NHS is doomed as a result. (Ok - I was sweeping a floor at the time and may have condensed this slightly, but you get my drift.)

One caller on the dreaded Call Kaye programme suggested labelling every instant meal with an example of the kind of exercise that would burn off the calories contained therein. I thought this a marvellous idea - it was the realisation that to rid myself of the calories of an average pizza I would have to climb a Munroe carrying a pack that had me decide that life was too short to eat pizza and would probably be shorter if I did.

Back to the leaflet. On average, the calories contained in the average helping of the snacks whose recipes looked so tempting - and these are one- or two-bite nibbles we're talking here - the average content was between 400 and 500 calories. Thats's appalling. The main culprits seemed to lie in the use of cream and butter, even on apparently healthful things like sprouts. Three of these snacks would constitute the recommended calorific average for someone of my age, build and height for a whole day unless I took some exercise. 

That's it, really. I'll probably eat a few such items over the gluttony season, leave my body to complain afterwards of the abuse, but not without thinking about it. I'm not miserable about that at all - any more than I am about cutting out, say, oysters from my diet (they have dire consequences for me). And I am reminded of something my father said when I was a skinny teen going to the cinema regularly and eating a bag of peanuts in the darkness. "That's enough to feed a starving family for a day."

He was ahead of his time, I think.

Three snacks and out⤴

from @ blethers

I found myself, in a procrastinating moment, leafing through a leaflet from the Co-op, a Christmas leaflet promising all manner of festive treats that could readily be bought or whipped up using a range of Co-op products. I was lured to check out the helpful little labels at the foot of each recipe - you know, the ones with the 'traffic-light' system of grading content of fat, salt, sugar etc.

I suppose I was thinking of the disturbing news the other day that doctors no longer know what the average healthy weight of an 8-year old is because almost all children in Scotland are overweight or obese. It seems that the adult population is also heading for the buffers fully laden, as it were, and the NHS is doomed as a result. (Ok - I was sweeping a floor at the time and may have condensed this slightly, but you get my drift.)

One caller on the dreaded Call Kaye programme suggested labelling every instant meal with an example of the kind of exercise that would burn off the calories contained therein. I thought this a marvellous idea - it was the realisation that to rid myself of the calories of an average pizza I would have to climb a Munroe carrying a pack that had me decide that life was too short to eat pizza and would probably be shorter if I did.

Back to the leaflet. On average, the calories contained in the average helping of the snacks whose recipes looked so tempting - and these are one- or two-bite nibbles we're talking here - the average content was between 400 and 500 calories. Thats's appalling. The main culprits seemed to lie in the use of cream and butter, even on apparently healthful things like sprouts. Three of these snacks would constitute the recommended calorific average for someone of my age, build and height for a whole day unless I took some exercise. 

That's it, really. I'll probably eat a few such items over the gluttony season, leave my body to complain afterwards of the abuse, but not without thinking about it. I'm not miserable about that at all - any more than I am about cutting out, say, oysters from my diet (they have dire consequences for me). And I am reminded of something my father said when I was a skinny teen going to the cinema regularly and eating a bag of peanuts in the darkness. "That's enough to feed a starving family for a day."

He was ahead of his time, I think.

On cooking, baking – and custard creams⤴

from @ blethers

I've been thinking about food. Or, to be more accurate, I've been thinking about cooking and baking and how I feel about these activities - and about the fact that this morning I spent about an hour reading a recipe book. (I was given a pile of wonderful Ottolenghi books for Christmas; they're already full of paper markers and a list to tell me where exciting-looking things are.) It is perhaps a clue to my attitude that I then felt compelled to clean the bath - for a small inner voice told me that I'd been wasting time, sitting in my cosy living-room looking at the birds on the snowy feeder and reading about food. And cooking.

I love food. I'm what you would well call fussy, in that I like interesting and well-cooked food, and that there are things I body-swerve with increasing dedication: cream, fatty foods, shellfish, anything that will lie weightily in my digestive system long after I'd prefer to have forgotten about it. My mother, and now my sister, have long mocked my preference for green tea. But because I love good food, I try to produce same - and on the whole I would say I succeed. The creation on the right is one I recently enjoyed - venison fillet accompanied by freekeh pilaff and garlic yogurt - and I usually say that no-one who likes eating should be incapable of producing a decent meal.

But even after almost 44 years of being responsible for making the meals in my own home, I still feel it's not really me. I have the sense that I'm a sort of dilettante cook, playing at it without having acquired the basic skills or even the right equipment. Baking is even worse. My closest pal throws pastry together without a thought and uses it to entertain my grandchildren; she may never know (unless she reads this) how much awe I hold her in for this simple act. My Christmas cake is the best I've ever eaten, but since I stopped making children's birthday cakes it's the only cake I ever make - and more or less the only cake I eat, come to that.

So when I refer to myself as a Domestic Goddess, you should know that I do so in the spirit of deepest irony. Cooking - and the odd bit of baking - gets fitted in round the rest of my life even if the results are totally toothsome, and there's always this feeling that I'm in the same boat as the monkeys writing a Shakespeare play. Or something. My attitude to eating, I've decided, has hardened over the years. I shall never again, for example, eat a pizza - because you have to climb a Munro to use up the resulting calories. And I shall leave you with one final, devastating truth:

Life is too short to eat a custard cream.