Tag Archives: Family learning

Resources to support health and wellbeing in Gaelic Medium Education (GME)⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The Safer Scotland Scottish Government website has resources to support children learning through the medium of Gaelic. These include interactive games and stories.  Please visit:

http://gaelic.gosafewithziggy.com/

Road Safety – ‘Go Safe with Ziggy’ Competition

Ziggy’s BIG competition is about helping children learn about road safety in a fun, creative way.  This is part of a Scotland-wide movement to help young children be safe on roads and about traffic. The competition is open until the end of April 2018.

Comhairle nan Leabhraichean Bileag Ùr do Phàrantan⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Tha Comhairle nan Leabhraichean air bileag ùr a chruthachadh do phàrantan aig nach eil Gàidhlig, aig a bheil clann ann am foghlam tro mheadhan na Gàidhlig. Tha molaidhean agus fiosrachadh ann mu dheidhinn leabhraichean agus goireasan a tha rim faighinn airson diofar aoisean, bho phàistean gu inbhich òga. Cuiribh fios Shelagh is cuiridh iad pasgan dhan sgoil.

The Gaelic Books Council has produced a new leaflet for non-Gaelic speaking parents of children in Gaelic Medium Education. It contains information and advice about books and resources for all ages. Please contact Shelagh for more information.

“Children need to be more involved in talking about their own learning and progress”⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

By Jackie Maley, HM Inspector and Lead Officer for early learning and childcare

This is an exciting time in Early Learning and Childcare (ELC). Planning for the expansion programme is well underway as we look ahead to what this may mean for our future inspections.  There is much for practitioners to be reflecting on in their current practice to ensure this continues to improve and that they provide high-quality learning experiences for all children, including under-threes.

The recently published report, ‘Quality and Improvement in Scottish Education 2012-2016’ (QuISE) highlighted a number of key areas of strengths and aspects for improvement from ELC inspections. You can read the ELC chapter from the QuISE report on our website.

Inspectors found that the quality of children’s learning experiences continues to be an area of strength. Staff continued to promote children’s engagement and motivation in their learning.  Strong relationships with children and their families were also identified as being a strength in many ELC settings.

A common aspect for development which was highlighted was the need for settings to improve their approaches to self-evaluation and, in particular, methods for  monitoring and tracking children’s progress.  When such approaches are robust and consistently applied by all staff,  we observe children making the best possible progress  while engaged in appropriately challenging learning experiences.

In the current academic year, we have inspected a number of ELC settings. It is pleasing to observe staff engaging well with ‘How Good is Our Early Learning and Childcare?’ to support them in reflecting on and improving their practice.  In the best examples, we also see staff making use of ‘Building the Ambition’ guidance to support their self-evaluation activities.  We know that staff engage well with the case studies included in this document to help them plan for future developments.

Over this session we have also found that staff continue to ensure that they foster strong relationships with children and their families. In a few of the settings we have visited, staff have developed their understanding of attachment to support children well.  We have also noted that staff are now making more positive attempts to improve outdoor learning experiences for children.  In the best examples, we see children with regular access to high-quality outdoor learning which promotes their skills in curiosity, investigation and creativity.

It is settings’ approaches to planning and assessment that still remain areas for improvement. Children need to be more involved in talking about their own learning and progress.  By doing this, children will have increased motivation and development of key skills to support them in making continuous progress in their learning and development.

While we see staff keen to capture and document children’s progress, it is not always done in a consistently effective way.  It is important that staff are skilled in making observations of children’s learning.  It is not necessary for everything to be recorded, only those parts of learning and development that are significant for individual children.

As practitioners become more confident in documenting children’s progress, they will find they are able to plan learning better for the differing needs of the children in their care.   This will also enable practitioners to provide appropriate challenge as necessary. We are now observing children engaging better with their learning profiles and, also, staff developing new approaches to involve parents more in their child’s learning.  Parents joining their children in the playrooms for shared learning sessions is becoming a regular feature in many settings.  We look forward to seeing how staff continue to take a creative approach to involving parents in their children’s learning as we complete this year’s ELC inspections.

Leugh Sgriobh Cunntais / Read Write Count Gaelic Support Page⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

A help page for parents and carers of children in Gaelic Medium Education is available on the Read Write Count website. To access this page please follow this link:

http://www.readwritecount.scot/gaelic-support-page/

read-write-count-logo-gaelic-aw-di

 

 

Can we learn from Making Ireland Click – Literacy series⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Making Ireland Click is a campaigning four-part series, guided by Ireland’s Digital Champion, David Puttnam.  on the skills  Irish citizens need  to be  digitally literate. Over four half hour episodes, the series deals with digital inclusion and showcases work around skills needed  to go online.

There are a range of useful adult learner resources, including videos on online banking and social media tips, available on the shows.
To learn more about Making Ireland Click see here

John Muir Award activity with schools 2015-2016⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

john_muir_way_scotland_10-12-2006The John Muir Award is used to help deliver Curriculum for Excellence outcomes and demonstrates Learning for Sustainability in action. It involves pupils taking responsibility for nature (in school grounds and communities), helps establish aspirations for healthy behaviour, and improves wellbeing in line with Scottish Government SHANARRI indicators. Such activity helps foster a culture of achievement in schools – building essential skills for life, learning and work, and raising attainment for all.

During 2015-2016:

  •  445 schools were involved in delivering the John Muir Award in Scotland (this includes 45% of Secondary Schools, 12% of Primary Schools and 13% of Special Schools)
  •  15,858 Awards were achieved by pupils and staff (15% increase on 2014-15)
  •  3,362 Awards (21%) were achieved by pupils who experience some form of disadvantage

For full report with breakdown of each local authority  see here

National Coding Week 19th September 2016⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

NCW-Banner-BlueText-Scottish

How to get involved with National Coding Week

Children are part of a confident “Digital Generation” having grown up with the internet, smart phones and coding classes. However, many adults have missed out on the digital revolution and feel left behind.

“The aim of National Coding Week is to give adults the opportunity to learn some digital skills”.

Children can inspire adults

Children are learning digital skills in school or through coding clubs such as CoderDojos. We therefore would like these clubs to open their doors to parents for a one-off session in which the children will teach the adults some of the skills they have learnt.

Libraries can act as focal points

Libraries are in an ideal position to act as a focal point and can host a coding session. Either the staff can lead the session or someone who is confident and familiar with coding from the local community can share their skills. Read CILIP’s blog: Libraries — how they can improve our Digital Literacy

Schools can get involved

Children are learning coding but many parents don’t understand what their children are doing and many non-specialist teachers and governors feel they have missed out on these skills.

Web, app, creative and digital businesses can throw open their doors

Those with the expertise can share their skills and have fun teaching people the basics of coding. There are many training organisations who offer courses throughout the year. They can contribute to the week by offering taster sessions to encourage people to sign-up.

Tech Hubs

There are hundreds of tech hubs with amazing businesses working from them. The tech hubs are giving start-ups a platform from which to launch businesses and inspire others. These can be the perfect venue for the week and we would love them to be involved.

Advice:

1) Keep it simple — it might simply by showing people resources available on the Technologies Professional Learning Community  in Glow, Code.org or Barefoot Computing

2) If you are able to organise it, get a friendly local web development agency, ICT teacher or FE college tutor to lead the session.

Click here to get involved!

Become a River Monitoring Volunteer⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog


 

For more information click on the links below:

Photo guide for volunteers

Recording sheet

 

Learning Families – Intergenerational Approaches to Literacy Teaching and Learning⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

“All of the programmes featured in this publication by the UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning  share valuable experiences and lessons. They reflect a view of effective learning families whereby each child is a member of a family, and within a learning family every member is a lifelong learner. Among disadvantaged families and communities in particular, a family literacy and learning approach is more likely to break the intergenerational cycle of low education and literacy skills..” (Elfert and Hanermann 2014)

http://uil.unesco.org/fileadmin/keydocuments/Literacy/en/learning-families.pdf

Family Learning Research⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

This report presents findings from a study of family literacy programmes in England carried out by the National Research and Development Centre for Adult Literacy and Numeracy (NRDC) at UCL Institute of Education (IOE) between July 2013 and May 2015. This mixed-methods study was funded by the Nuffield Foundation and explored: 1) the impact of school-based family literacy programmes on young children’s progress in reading and writing; and 2) how parents translate and implement what they learn in these classes into the home literacy environment. This study provides evidence that after attending family literacy sessions children improve their literacy skills and there are positive changes in the home literacy environment.

http://www.nrdc.org.uk/?p=838