Tag Archives: Facebook

A Facebook Like⤴

from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

Facebook was the key to the entire campaign, Wigmore explained. A Facebook ‘like’, he said, was their most “potent weapon”. “Because using artificial intelligence, as we did, tells you all sorts of things about that individual and how to convince them with what sort of advert. And you knew there would also be other people in their network who liked what they liked, so you could spread. And then you follow them. The computer never stops learning and it never stops monitoring.”

from: Robert Mercer: the big data billionaire waging war on mainstream media | Politics | The Guardian

Carole Cadwalladr’s article in today’s Observer, is both fascinating and frightening. The technology used by Cambridge Analytics is incredibly  powerful the use it has ben put too worrying. Andy Wigmore, Leave.EU’s comms director in the quote above doesn’t have a Facebook account quoted in the same article:

It is creepy! It’s really creepy! It’s why I’m not on Facebook! I tried it on myself to see what information it had on me and I was like, ‘Oh my God!’ What’s scary is that my kids had put things on Instagram and it picked that up. It knew where my kids went to school.

Featured image on this post created with a wee AppleScript Makes auto complete google search gifs.

Medium

Microcast 5: Choices⤴

from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

IMG_7438.jpeg

Some thoughts about making choices about the software and systems you use, they may have hidden positives or negatives.

Featured image, iPhone screenshot, edited in snapseed

    The Loudest Voices⤴

    from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

    best-tweets

    A classroom, like any other social group will have popular pupils, the ones who get heard most by other pupils. I guess a teachers job is to encourage participation for all learners.

    We have to think if software companies are the best people to curate our information.

    A While back I turned off the setting in twitter to show me the ‘best tweets’ first. I noted that I hadn’t noticed this being turned on.

    Yesterday I found a new setting, not sure when it happened, and tweeted turning it off with a gif:

    quality-filter

    I don’t want Twitter being a quality filter.

    This got a couple of interesting replies and I put in a few more pence worth:

     

    I don’t really do Facebook 1 but it is even further done the algorithmic path.

    I presume the algorithms will be designed with the end goal of getting more ad views, not for what is ‘best’ for the user or community. They may also have negative effects on a learning community see: Participant association and emergent curriculum in a MOOC: can the community be the curriculum? | Bell | Research in Learning Technology, which I’ve read too quickly a couple of times now.

    I don’t suppose there is much to do about this in the short term other than turning off settings when we can. Longer term it might be wise to think about the IndieWeb.

    Featured Image: A screenshot…

    PS. This post is mostly a few tweets, I’ve been thinking that interesting things often get lost in the stream, and pulling out a bunch might be useful.

    1. I did take part in a very useful mini-mooc and have heard of great educational examples but I tend to steer clear.

    Reading List: Facebook⤴

    from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

    solid-links

    This is a experiment, I’ve generated a list of my recent (last 6 weeks) Pinboard: bookmarks tagged ‘facebook’ and post them below.

    This will hopefully be a useful reference for me and perhaps others.

    I’ve been thinking about Facebook quite a bit recently. I still only visit occasionally and feel fairly negative about it. When I do visit I often see interesting things about folk I know, but not enough to make me visit more often. I also recognise that it can be used for really interesting projects for example the EAST Project we talked about on on Radio #EDUtalk.

    The video, linked to by Alan, held my attention for the full hour (I find it hard to watch online videos for more than a few minutes).

    The Featured Images is Soild links | SONY DSC | Bernard Spragg. NZ | Flickr used under a public domain license. Stamped with the stamped attributor version of flickr cc attribution bookmarklet maker.

    Dragons on Social Media⤴

    from @ blethers

    Now here's a thing. I have an ambivalent attitude to Facebook. It shows in the fact that I very rarely
    post directly to it; I will share something that I find interesting or provocative but apart from that anything that appears from me comes through other social media outlets, primarily Twitter. But I use Facebook because it's useful - useful for contacting people, for posting group updates, for finding people.

    That said, there are some implications in using such a medium. I came up against one yesterday, when I discovered quite by accident that someone I know in real life (RL) had "unfriended" me. (Vile phrase, but that's what it says). I only found out when I wanted to tag this person, to draw his attention to a piece of local news that could have had an effect on him. What could I have done to offend him? Had I snubbed him hideously? Maligned him in public?

    Not being the reticent type, I asked him. His reply indicated that he'd found my posts too limited in range (i.e. not interesting to him personally). I'll not say anything about the things he posts about, nor about the online "friendships" he has struck up with people who are actually my friends. (I know - I've just said it. No details, though ...) 

    And I realised - or at least I think I did - that actually it was ignorance that had caused him to cut me off in this unseemly fashion. For it is perfectly possible to hide the posts of someone you find tedious without actually consigning them to virtual outer darkness. Either he didn't care (so not ignorant) or he hadn't realised.

    The fact is that I don't actually care either. But it brought home to me the added dimension of having an online connection with someone you see on a regular basis. It made me want to shun Facebook, as a goodly number of people do - but that's just silly. When I suggested it to another friend (RL as well as virtual) she protested that she enjoys my posts and links. So I'll just carry on for now.

    But I realise that my attitude to this chap whose grasp of the niceties of relationships is so inadequate has changed. Perhaps I've learned something about him that it's good to have found out before it impinged on my everyday life. And I am reflecting on the fact that I originally signed up for F/b (long after I was an early adopter of Twitter) because it allowed for a more varied collection of people to stay in touch - former pupils, former colleagues, my family - and that is as important as it ever was.

    But I shall think twice before automatically accepting the "friendship" of people I consider acquaintances - for there be dragons.


    Dragons on Social Media⤴

    from @ blethers

    Now here's a thing. I have an ambivalent attitude to Facebook. It shows in the fact that I very rarely
    post directly to it; I will share something that I find interesting or provocative but apart from that anything that appears from me comes through other social media outlets, primarily Twitter. But I use Facebook because it's useful - useful for contacting people, for posting group updates, for finding people.

    That said, there are some implications in using such a medium. I came up against one yesterday, when I discovered quite by accident that someone I know in real life (RL) had "unfriended" me. (Vile phrase, but that's what it says). I only found out when I wanted to tag this person, to draw his attention to a piece of local news that could have had an effect on him. What could I have done to offend him? Had I snubbed him hideously? Maligned him in public?

    Not being the reticent type, I asked him. His reply indicated that he'd found my posts too limited in range (i.e. not interesting to him personally). I'll not say anything about the things he posts about, nor about the online "friendships" he has struck up with people who are actually my friends. (I know - I've just said it. No details, though ...) 

    And I realised - or at least I think I did - that actually it was ignorance that had caused him to cut me off in this unseemly fashion. For it is perfectly possible to hide the posts of someone you find tedious without actually consigning them to virtual outer darkness. Either he didn't care (so not ignorant) or he hadn't realised.

    The fact is that I don't actually care either. But it brought home to me the added dimension of having an online connection with someone you see on a regular basis. It made me want to shun Facebook, as a goodly number of people do - but that's just silly. When I suggested it to another friend (RL as well as virtual) she protested that she enjoys my posts and links. So I'll just carry on for now.

    But I realise that my attitude to this chap whose grasp of the niceties of relationships is so inadequate has changed. Perhaps I've learned something about him that it's good to have found out before it impinged on my everyday life. And I am reflecting on the fact that I originally signed up for F/b (long after I was an early adopter of Twitter) because it allowed for a more varied collection of people to stay in touch - former pupils, former colleagues, my family - and that is as important as it ever was.

    But I shall think twice before automatically accepting the "friendship" of people I consider acquaintances - for there be dragons.


    Dragons on Social Media⤴

    from @ blethers

    Now here's a thing. I have an ambivalent attitude to Facebook. It shows in the fact that I very rarely
    post directly to it; I will share something that I find interesting or provocative but apart from that anything that appears from me comes through other social media outlets, primarily Twitter. But I use Facebook because it's useful - useful for contacting people, for posting group updates, for finding people.

    That said, there are some implications in using such a medium. I came up against one yesterday, when I discovered quite by accident that someone I know in real life (RL) had "unfriended" me. (Vile phrase, but that's what it says). I only found out when I wanted to tag this person, to draw his attention to a piece of local news that could have had an effect on him. What could I have done to offend him? Had I snubbed him hideously? Maligned him in public?

    Not being the reticent type, I asked him. His reply indicated that he'd found my posts too limited in range (i.e. not interesting to him personally). I'll not say anything about the things he posts about, nor about the online "friendships" he has struck up with people who are actually my friends. (I know - I've just said it. No details, though ...) 

    And I realised - or at least I think I did - that actually it was ignorance that had caused him to cut me off in this unseemly fashion. For it is perfectly possible to hide the posts of someone you find tedious without actually consigning them to virtual outer darkness. Either he didn't care (so not ignorant) or he hadn't realised.

    The fact is that I don't actually care either. But it brought home to me the added dimension of having an online connection with someone you see on a regular basis. It made me want to shun Facebook, as a goodly number of people do - but that's just silly. When I suggested it to another friend (RL as well as virtual) she protested that she enjoys my posts and links. So I'll just carry on for now.

    But I realise that my attitude to this chap whose grasp of the niceties of relationships is so inadequate has changed. Perhaps I've learned something about him that it's good to have found out before it impinged on my everyday life. And I am reflecting on the fact that I originally signed up for F/b (long after I was an early adopter of Twitter) because it allowed for a more varied collection of people to stay in touch - former pupils, former colleagues, my family - and that is as important as it ever was.

    But I shall think twice before automatically accepting the "friendship" of people I consider acquaintances - for there be dragons.


    Aquila: fast, light (& internet.org enabled)⤴

    from @ OllieBray.com

    Aquila-06

    Yesterday, I published a post about the internet.org project.

    In the post I mentioned the proposed large solar-powered drones that are a key part of the project to distribute the Internet to remote areas via Laser. Although it sounds like a late April Fools Joke - the whole idea and concept is very true. As I also said yesterday, whether you agree with the project or not you just can't fault the original thinking and design that has gone into making this happen.

    The drone (code named Aquila after the eagle in Greek mythology who carried Jupiter's thunderbolts) is a very impressive piece of engineering.

    The V-shaped, carbon fibre prototype weighs between 880lbs. and 1,000lbs. It has a wingspan bigger than a Boeing 737 and is capable of flying at altitudes between 60,000 feet and 90,000 for three months at a time.

     

    According to Mashable.com:

    "The Aquila is just one part of Internet.org, the Facebook-backed organization that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg launched in 2013, aimed at bringing Internet connectivity to the remaining 10% of the world's population who lack access. The service partners with local telecomm companies and developers to offer a free, basic Internet experience with access to things like Facebook, Wikipedia and BBC News."

    As I say, very impressive - and also further proof that Facebook is a lot more than we perhaps think it is as well as being led by a truly innovative, very human and forward thinking CEO.  

     

    Internet.org: challenges and opportunities for Scottish Education?⤴

    from @ OllieBray.com

    Internet.org_Logo

    I believe, projects like Internet.org will create a rapid increase global communication and with it global competition - but is the Scottish education system ready to accept the challenges and benefits that ambitions projects such as this will bring?

    __________________________________

    Internet.org is an ambitious Facebook-led initiative bringing together technology leaders, non-profits and local communities to connect the two thirds of the world that doesn't have Internet access. This lack of access is due to a combination of factors such as devices being too expensive, service plans being too expensive, no mobile networks, content not available in the local languages, limited power sources, poor networks that are unable to support a large amount of data and local populations unsure of the value that the Internet could bring.

     

    The Internet.org project has been met with some resistance.

    Interestingly the main resistance seems to be from people who already have access to the Internet (including all the benefits it brings) but are now keen to make a lot of money out of providing connectivity to others. Or, by groups of people who argue that it will create a two tear system of partial and full connectivity (which is bizarre when the alternative is full and no connectivity?).

    Whether you agree with its principals or not you can’t help admire the sheer ambition of the project which includes providing connectivity my lasers through a series of solar powered high altitude gliders that have a wing span larger that a Boeing 747 but weight less than a car!

    What I love about the project as well is how much societal progress we could make by increasing the potential of online global collaboration from 33% towards 100%. Of course, with an increase in potential collaboration on this level and with it an increase in global competition the UK will need to ‘up-its-game’ in terms of the digital skills and the innovation agenda within schools.internet.org

     

    Lets hope someone in the Scottish Government Learning Directorate / Education Scotland has this as a standing item on their ‘Education Futures’ agenda. Projects like this that will rapidly up the levels of global competition (which is not a bad thing) will literally be here in no time.