Tag Archives: ePortfolio

What, Why and How of e-Portfolios for Learners⤴

from @ ICT for Teaching & Learning in Falkirk Primary Schools

DigitalPortfolioHeaderWhat is an E-Portfolio?

A digital portfolio or e-portfolio can take several forms, and have different purposes. Whether it’s a place to share a learning journey, record notable achievements, provide a platform for a learner’s reflections on progress, or to link to records/artefacts/evidence stored elsewhere of skills, examples of work or achievements, or chart future goals and stepping stones to objectives. It may provide opportunity for feedback by peers of learners or educators, and it can provide a means for a learner to collate aspects of their digital footprint as they journey through life.

wikipediaeportfolioWikipedia provides a detailed description of e-portfolios and examples of the different forms and purposes for having an e-portfolio which may include documenting skills and learning, recording and tracking development within a course, planning educational journeys, evaluating and monitoring performance or a course, and helping to find a job.

Why have an E-Portfolio?

The purpose is the key – it’s all too easy to get bogged down in technical set-up issues rather than have a focus on why it’s going to be used by learners. And, while in educational settings the purpose may sometimes be laid down as a requirement, whether by school leadership, or local education authority or by governments, the teacher and the learner need to be clear about the purpose of having the e-portfolio so that it does not become a chore or seen as a burden but instead supports the learning process of the learner. Prasanna Bharti has described at The EdTech review how e-portfolios can help learners

DrHelenBarrettDr Helen Barrett at the site www.electronicportfolios.org provides a comprehensive source of information about e-portfolios – why they should be created, what should be in an e-portfolio, and what tools might be used to create an e-portfolio. The site describes several models, provides answers to frequently asked questions about e-portfolios, and details how different tools/platforms (whether online tools or mobile device apps) can be used.

EdutopiaBethHollandDigital Portfolio: The Art of Reflection by Beth Holland - a post which gives a useful background to what the focus of an e-portfolio should be, not on the technical how-tos, nor on a digital portfolio as a summative-only “curate>reflect>publish” model but instead on the process building on developing asking the essential questions to make reflection at the centre of the process.

VickiDavisE-portfoliosVicki Davis has produced “11 Essentials for Excellent E-Portfolios” – this article describes the necessity to be clear about the purpose behind learners having an e-portfolio, and the importance of it being embedded as part of the learning process, including a focus on reflection and ownership by the learner. The article describes a variety of tools which could be used to create an e-portfolio.

eportfoliosareawesomeePortfolios are Awesome – a presentation by Lisa Johnson about the why, how and what of student digital portfolios. This presents in graphical form links to a host of articles about why digital portfolios are important, things to consider (including ownership, who gets to see it, feedback, how it’s organised, when and how it will be populated, and what tool to use), and examples of e-portfolios.

How to Make an E-Portfolio?

What tools can you use to create an e-portfolio? There’s a whole range of tools which lets the user record their learning journey, record their achievements and reflections – whether that’s a paper record, a digital form of a paper record (whether simply Microsoft Word stored locally) or a digital tool which is stored in the cloud (and which can be kept private to the individual, or shared with limited others such as parents/carers or teaching staff, or made public for all to see online).

The choice is determined by the purpose and audience (who will get to see the e-portfolio) – and may be determined in a school context by a school policy or Local Education Authority providing the tool, guidance, and support.

In making your choice (if you have a choice) consideration should be given to moving on from one educational establishment or local education authority to another. Take into account when making your choice of platform the ease with which the content on the tool used can be shared or exported in a form which can provide ease of continuity into another school or Local Education Authority.

Wikiclick on this link for more about wikis – an online repository which can grow and expand and be interlinked in different ways for different purposes. Jacqui Murray has provided a detailed description of how she used wikis with her pupils for their e-portfolios. This describes the purpose behind the e-portfolio for her primary-aged pupils and explains the steps to making use of a Wikispaces wiki (Wikispaces are the wikis available to all Glow users) – which can be either private so it’s only accessible to the learner, or shared with their teachers or made public (it all comes back to the purpose and the audience).

Microsoft OneNoteclick on this link for more information about Microsoft OneNote – essentially an electronic ring-binder with different sections or subsections, in which there can be multiple pages. And each page can include text, video, audio, images and links – and all works across platforms, online or mobile devices.

Blog – there are several blogging platforms available which are suitable for use in an educational context. Click on this link for more about blogging tools for schools. Glow users in Scotland have access to WordPress blogs. Also look at the blog examples on Dr Helen Barrett’s Electronic Portfolios site: http://www.electronicportfolios.org/. Microsoft Office 365 has a blog option within SharePoint (available to Glow users – however note that in Glow a SharePoint blog cannot be made public outwith Glow, instead there is the option to use WordPress blog or a Wiki from Glow, both of which can be made public, or kept private, or have parts private and parts public).

Word-processed document – there are a variety of word-processing options including Google Docs and Microsoft Word in Office 365, some of which may include a template which can be adopted to get started creating and maintaining an e-Portfolio.

Mobile device apps – there are a number of apps available for different mobile device platforms. Dr Helen Barrett has produced a site which looks at the use of mobile devices for e-portfolios, including examples of apps for different device platforms. As with any choice of tool for creating an e-portfolio the portability of the data would need to be borne in mind – how easily will it be able to be exported to another mobile device platform, how easily can the information (whether in full or part) be shared when a learner moves establishment or beyond formal schooling? Many e-portfolio tools take this into account and some provide the information to undertake the necessary steps, some have inbuilt sharing or export tools.

There are many other tools which could be used to create an e-portfolio - it would just be recommended that the purpose is central to the choice, and that it takes into account requirements laid down by school leadership, local education authority or government to have best chance of that all that’s collated by the learner can be moved as the learner journeys through their educational path at different stages, and that it best supports the needs of the learner.

What other resources are there to help create and maintain an E-portfolio?

Cybrarymane-portfoliosJerry Blumengarten has collated a host of links to resources about e-portfolios, including links to articles explaining the purpose behind an e-portfolio, as well as many different tools and how they can be used to create e-portfolios.

ShamblesgurueportfoliosShambles Guru has collated a series of resources about using digital portfolios – these links by educator Chris Smith include tools for creating e-portfolios as well as articles about the purpose and effect on learning and teaching when learners make use of e-portfolios.

Why Wikis – the wonderful world of wikis in the classroom⤴

from @ ICT for Teaching & Learning in Falkirk Primary Schools

wikiwordle2What’s a Wiki?

Probably the best know Wiki is Wikipedia, ranked in the top ten of all websites, attracting hundreds of millions of visitors a month to the reference articles by tens of thousands of contributors. And, in a nutshell, that’s an illustration of what sets a wiki apart from other websites, blogs and online spaces – a wiki provides the facility for creation and editing of an online space by multiple users, with a transparent trail of edits for all who visit, making changes (and who made them) visible to all, and providing the facility to set alerts to changes made on the wiki so that anyone can be notified of changes as soon as they are made.

Why Use a Wiki in the Classroom?

Anywhere you might wish to have a collaborative online space for an educational purpose then a wiki can provide the means to support this. Whether it is for an online space to share resources with learners, or somewhere the learners themselves can jointly pool their research findings, links to articles elsewhere online, or with attached documents, presentations, videos, images and more. Not only can the wiki content be modified, but so can the look, feel and structure be manipulated to meet the needs of the group of users. So it might be a piece of creative collaborative writing, or it might be a place to bring together several pieces of writing on the same topic by each pupil in a class.

You can decide with a wiki who is going to be able to see the wiki – perhaps just the individual pupil and teaching staff, or a group of pupils and their teacher, or a whole class or school. Or you can make the wiki public for all to view. And equally you can decide who you wish to be able to modify the wiki – just one person, a small group, a class, the whole school or the entire world!

Here’s just some ideas for using a wiki in the classroom:

  • Outdoor learning or class trip observations, individually or jointly with others.
  • Science experiment planning, the process and record of observations – you can add video, pictures and audio descriptions.
  • Historical project – bringing together different pages perhaps by different learners on their chosen area of a local study, or a combined research topic on a historical theme.
  • Creative writing – individuals can use the revision feature of the tool to demonstrate to their teacher and others how their writing has developed. Other learners can be invited to add comments to encourage and offer suggestions.
  • A teacher can collate all resources on a single topic into one online space, bringing together documents in different formats, video, audio, images and links to related resources elsewhere.
  • Set tasks for learners, and the wiki can also be the space for them to submit their work – the wiki can be set to only be viewable by those in the class, or each pupil can have a space private to them and their teacher, with only the teacher’s main wiki space able to be seen by only the whole class.

TeacherGuideWikisThe Teacher’s Guide on the Use of Wikis in Education can be found on the Educational Technology and Mobile Learning blog – this provides many examples of the uses of wikis in a classroom setting and more advice on how wikis can be used in education.

Cybrary Man wikisCybraryman’s Wikis page – a comprehensive page of links by Jerry Blumengarten to hosts of educational wikis, guides to making use of wikis in a classroom setting, advice, examples and much more – worth a visit to be inspired to use a wiki in your classroom.

 What wiki-creation tools are there for classroom use?

wikispacesWikispaces provides a wiki platform for all users, and a specific wiki platform for  educational use, called Wikispaces Classroom. It is described on their site as “A social writing platform for education. We make it incredibly easy to create a classroom workspace where you and your students can communicate and work on writing projects alone or in teams.

GlowWikisGlow Wikis are available to all Glow users in Scotland, and Glow wikis are provided by Wikispaces, giving Glow users all of the functionality of a Wikispaces wiki (including Wikispaces Classroom which gives the option for additional classroom-specific tools) using their Glow username and password. Glow Wiki Help provides step by step guidance to getting started and how to develop a wiki in a classroom setting.

PBWorksPBWorks Education Wikis – free wiki platform for use in education (with premium version available for additional features). Lets you create student accounts without an email address, provides automated notifications of chnages to your wiki, easy to edit, gives you the option to grant access to those within or outwith your school, and of course to share pages, documents and any other content on your wiki – and it all works via mobile devices too.

 

OneNote to Rule them All⤴

from @ ICT for Teaching & Learning in Falkirk Primary Schools

OneNote is a free tool which works online through a web browser, or through apps for mobile devices, or as a desktop software (it’s also part of Microsoft Office 2013). 

And it’s available to users of Microsoft Office 365 (so all Scottish school pupils and staff with Glow access have this as part of the features available automatically to them via their Glow login).

But what is OneNote?

It’s like a ring-binder where you can choose to have multiple sections (like card-dividers in a real ring-binder), and within each section you can have multiple pages​. And it all synchronises on multiple devices should you wish it to do so.

How might OneNote be used in a classroom context?

So you may be a teacher who may have sections in a OneNote file for each subject, and within each subject pages for each pupil. Each page can contain text, photographs, comments, web links, audio or video so may be an evidence gathering tool for a teacher. A picture to show evidence of a piece of practical work can be instantly inserted via mobile device straight to a pupil’s page for a particular subject in the OneNote file.

Pupils could create a OneNote of their own and use it as a learning log, an eportfolio, a place to jot down their notes, links to resources, documents, websites, etc. And a OneNote stored online can be shared with another user – so a pupil may create a piece of work in a OneNote file for a particular topic, subject or teacher and share access to that so it could be shared only with that one pupil and their teacher.

The creator of the OneNote file can choose to make it so that the teacher can add comments to the document for feedback to the pupil, directly on the document. And in some versions they can also add an audio file of feedback straight into the page.

Here’s a video tutorial showing how OneNote might be used as a pupil topic research tool

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i0hfsJaHTOM

Here’s a video showing OneNote being used as a learning journal shared by the pupil with their teacher http://www.youtube.com/watch?&v=pAubfxGwRJQ

Here’s a video by educator Lisa Cuthbert-Novak showing how her learners use OneNote to chronicle their learning journey in writing, particularly noting the reflections the pupils added to what they were learning as they added examples of their work, their thoughts on the process and links to resources they found:

http://vimeo.com/113114835

Choose Your Own Adventure stories - this links to a blog post by Pip Cleaves describing how using the facility to add links to different pages in a OneNote file pupils can create stories with alternative texts for different junctures in a story for their readers.

So how do you get started using OneNote?

Here’s a link to a basic guide to One Note Online: ​http://goo.gl/tbVYsL ​

These two links below also give an overview of the features of the different versions of OneNote, whether the online version, the full desktop software version, or the apps specific to different devices:

http://goo.gl/qLY6go

http://goo.gl/PGrwkA

OneNote Toolkit for Teachers - a site which provides guides, examples and hints and tips for teachers looking to use OneNote in a classroom context.  This comes from the Microsoft Educator Network

​OneNote Class Notebook Creator

If schools are signed up to Office 365 then they also have the additional option to use OneNote’s education-specific class tool OneNote Class Notebook Creator where a OneNote class file can be set up so that individual sections or pages can have different access rights or permissions. So a teacher may have a pupil’s page in a class OneNote file shared with only that pupil and the teacher, meaning that nobody else can see that pupil’s work except the teacher and the specific pupil. Or a group of named pupils could have access to specific pages for collaborative working. This is designed to make management easier for the teacher and give more options for different purposes.

Note that in Office 365 the OneNote Class Notebook Creator needs to first be enabled by whoever administer’s the school’s establishment site – once it’s installed teachers can then set up their own class Notebooks.

Here’s a video showing how to get started setting up and using OneNote Class Creator so that a teacher can set up a personal workspace for every learner, a content library for resources, and a collaboration space for lessons and activities https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVF90nP9qGQ 

Here's a related interactive online guide to setting up and using OneNote Class notebook creator - listen to the information, move on pages at your own speed.

OneNote and Assessment – this is a blogpost by Chantelle Davies describing how they see the use of OneNote for assessment with a focus on the audio and video features providing the facility for teachers to create a workspace for every pupil, to offer a content library for adding material, and a collaboration space, with which pupils can work in their space and teachers can give feedback in the same place. The work and feedback can be accessed anywhere any time.

OneNote for Teachers - a comprehensive site which details how OneNote can be got for any device, how it can be set up for use, examples of ways in which it can be used, help guides and much more – all within a classroom context.

Microsoft Office has also produced a visual walk-through guide “Getting Started with the OneNote Class Notebook Creator: A Walkthrough for Teachers”

OneNote to Rule them All⤴

from @ ICT for Teaching & Learning in Falkirk Primary Schools

OneNote is a free tool which works online through a web browser, or through apps for mobile devices, or as a desktop software (it’s also part of Microsoft Office 2013).

And it’s available to users of Microsoft Office 365 (so all Scottish school pupils and staff with Glow access have this as part of the features available automatically to them via their Glow login).

But what is OneNote?

It’s like a ring-binder where you can choose to have multiple sections (like card-dividers in a real ring-binder), and within each section you can have multiple pages​. And it all synchronises on multiple devices should you wish it to do so.

How might OneNote be used in a classroom context?

So you may be a teacher who may have sections in a OneNote file for each subject, and within each subject pages for each pupil. Each page can contain text, photographs, comments, web links, audio or video so may be an evidence gathering tool for a teacher. A picture to show evidence of a piece of practical work can be instantly inserted via mobile device straight to a pupil’s page for a particular subject in the OneNote file.

Pupils could create a OneNote of their own and use it as a learning log, an eportfolio, a place to jot down their notes, links to resources, documents, websites, etc. And a OneNote stored online can be shared with another user – so a pupil may create a piece of work in a OneNote file for a particular topic, subject or teacher and share access to that so it could be shared only with that one pupil and their teacher.

The creator of the OneNote file can choose to make it so that the teacher can add comments to the document for feedback to the pupil, directly on the document. And in some versions they can also add an audio file of feedback straight into the page.

Here’s a video tutorial showing how OneNote might be used as a pupil topic research tool

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i0hfsJaHTOM

Here’s a video showing OneNote being used as a learning journal shared by the pupil with their teacher http://www.youtube.com/watch?&v=pAubfxGwRJQ

Here’s a video by educator Lisa Cuthbert-Novak showing how her learners use OneNote to chronicle their learning journey in writing, particularly noting the reflections the pupils added to what they were learning as they added examples of their work, their thoughts on the process and links to resources they found:

http://vimeo.com/113114835

Choose Your Own Adventure stories - this links to a blog post by Pip Cleaves describing how using the facility to add links to different pages in a OneNote file pupils can create stories with alternative texts for different junctures in a story for their readers.

Here’s a video by Tamara Sullivan explaining how learners in Sydney and Brisbane, who did not meet face to face, collaborated on a photo essay project using OneNote as the vehicle by which they could share ideas, tasks, photo-essays and comments by learners on the work of others.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4kSzezVzq0&WT

 

So how do you get started using OneNote?

Here’s a link to a basic guide to OneNote Online: ​http://goo.gl/tbVYsL ​

These two links below also give an overview of the features of the different versions of OneNote, whether the online version, the full desktop software version, or the apps specific to different devices:

http://goo.gl/qLY6go

http://goo.gl/PGrwkA

OneNote Toolkit for Teachers – a site which provides guides, examples and hints and tips for teachers looking to use OneNote in a classroom context.  This comes from the Microsoft Educator Network

​OneNote Class Notebook Creator

If schools are signed up to Office 365 then they also have the additional option to use OneNote’s education-specific class tool OneNote Class Notebook Creator where a OneNote class file can be set up so that individual sections or pages can have different access rights or permissions. So a teacher may have a pupil’s page in a class OneNote file shared with only that pupil and the teacher, meaning that nobody else can see that pupil’s work except the teacher and the specific pupil. Or a group of named pupils could have access to specific pages for collaborative working. This is designed to make management easier for the teacher and give more options for different purposes.

Note that in Office 365 the OneNote Class Notebook Creator needs to first be enabled by whoever administers the school’s establishment site – once it’s installed teachers can then set up their own class Notebooks.

Here’s a video showing how to get started setting up and using OneNote Class Creator so that a teacher can set up a personal workspace for every learner, a content library for resources, and a collaboration space for lessons and activities https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVF90nP9qGQ

Here’s a video showing how a teacher can set up a OneNote Class Notebook from their OneDrive in Office 365:

Here's a related interactive online guide to setting up and using OneNote Class notebook creator - listen to the information, move on pages at your own speed.

OneNote and Assessment – this is a blogpost by Chantelle Davies describing how they see the use of OneNote for assessment with a focus on the audio and video features providing the facility for teachers to create a workspace for every pupil, to offer a content library for adding material, and a collaboration space, with which pupils can work in their space and teachers can give feedback in the same place. The work and feedback can be accessed anywhere any time.

OneNote for Teachers – a comprehensive site which details how OneNote can be got for any device, how it can be set up for use, examples of ways in which it can be used, help guides and much more – all within a classroom context.

Microsoft Office has also produced a visual walk-through guide “Getting Started with the OneNote Class Notebook Creator: A Walkthrough for Teachers”

The way in which students are assessed fundamentally affects their learning⤴

from @ TecnoTeach


What contribution can technology make to the assessment process?  Is it just a faster way to gather in data and feedback results?  Is it just an electronic method of assessing at the end of a learning block?  Is it too clinical and not personal?  If you answer yes to the above questions then you have probably not had experience of using ePortfolios, blogs, wikis, simulation games, content creation applications etc.


The JISC Effective Assessment in a Digital Age publication explains the 'what, why and how' to integrate eAssessment into the learning process with an emphasis on the 'how' more than the 'what'.

Yes, technology has the potential to enhance/facilitate assessment but to be transformational it needs to have a clear educational purpose and engagement.  It should not just be used!


If using technology to assess it should have opportunities for:


  • Dialogue and Communication
  • Immediacy and Contingency
  • Authenticity
  • Speed and was of Processing
  • Self-Evaluative, Self-Regulated Learning
  • Additionality
Learners should have access to wide range of tools and choice of methods of presenting knowledge to encourage a deeper level of enquiry.  To become independent lifelong learners students need to develop self-monitoring and self-regulating against defined criteria to promote deeper and more effective learning.


The publication defines four broad perspectives on learning: Associative, Constructivist, Social Constructivist and Situative.  These four perspectives can work independent of one another or can be interconnected.  The table below provides an overview of each perspective and the assessment approach associated with it.


This publication hosts ten case studies that are set in Higher Education. Each case study employs different eAssessment methods and approaches depending on the nature of the learning environment and the purpose of the assessment.



JISC (2010) Effective assessment in a digital age.  Bristol: HEFCE.

The way in which students are assessed fundamentally affects their learning⤴

from @ TecnoTeach


What contribution can technology make to the assessment process?  Is it just a faster way to gather in data and feedback results?  Is it just an electronic method of assessing at the end of a learning block?  Is it too clinical and not personal?  If you answer yes to the above questions then you have probably not had experience of using ePortfolios, blogs, wikis, simulation games, content creation applications etc.


The JISC Effective Assessment in a Digital Age publication explains the 'what, why and how' to integrate eAssessment into the learning process with an emphasis on the 'how' more than the 'what'.

Yes, technology has the potential to enhance/facilitate assessment but to be transformational it needs to have a clear educational purpose and engagement.  It should not just be used!


If using technology to assess it should have opportunities for:


  • Dialogue and Communication
  • Immediacy and Contingency
  • Authenticity
  • Speed and was of Processing
  • Self-Evaluative, Self-Regulated Learning
  • Additionality
Learners should have access to wide range of tools and choice of methods of presenting knowledge to encourage a deeper level of enquiry.  To become independent lifelong learners students need to develop self-monitoring and self-regulating against defined criteria to promote deeper and more effective learning.


The publication defines four broad perspectives on learning: Associative, Constructivist, Social Constructivist and Situative.  These four perspectives can work independent of one another or can be interconnected.  The table below provides an overview of each perspective and the assessment approach associated with it.


This publication hosts ten case studies that are set in Higher Education. Each case study employs different eAssessment methods and approaches depending on the nature of the learning environment and the purpose of the assessment.



JISC (2010) Effective assessment in a digital age.  Bristol: HEFCE.

Forde, C., McMahon, M. & Reeves, J. (2009). Putting Together Professional Portfolios. London: Sage. Part 2 – Describe/Reflect/Evaluate through Windows Movie Making⤴

from @ TecnoTeach

'A portfolio is a means of structuring, demonstrating and reflecting on your development as a professional.  At the heart of portfolio development is your learning' (Forde, 2009, p,13).

The three elements to examining practice:

Reflection - Why something was undertaken a specific way.
Description - What happened?
Evaluation - How did this affect me?

It is not just examining one's own practice but what we observe and learn from others.  This can be through observing others teaching, attending a lecture or undertaking a CPD course or reading a book or article.  The only difference is, although we can reflect on what we observe or read, it is not until we put this into practice can we truly reflect on how this affects ourselves.

There are times when we reflect and match our learning to specific attainment goals, for example,   Standard for Initial Teacher Education (SITE) or HERA for lecturers at University.  The model of reflecting, describing and evaluating may paint a picture to the reader, however, this picture sometimes requires evidence to substantiate the claims being made.

Using the models presented above, I reflected on a recent Digital Moving Editing process with students that was undertaken last week.

1.  Reflection on Digital Movie Making Editing Process With Students

Small groups of student teachers had completed the filming part of their digital movies and were ready to progress to the Editing process using Windows Movie Maker.  This software was being used as it can be found on the majority of machines in schools, the University has this on their machines and all students have access to this software on their personal computers.

Prior to editing, the movie files required converting from .mp4 to .wmm.  The file were in this format due to using Flip Cameras.  To convert the files the online tool, zamzar.com, was used due to no converter software being on university machines and to show students a possible tool they could use for converting specific files.

2.  Description of What Happened

Converting the files using Zamzar was timely due to the software only allowing one upload at a time.  A link would then be sent to a specified email account to which the converted file could be downloaded.  To save time, students were asked to share this task rather than one student undertake with the whole process taking around 30 - 40 minutes.

In general, all files converted and played in their new .wmm format, however, the problem occurred when we tried to import them into Windows Movie Maker Software.  Some of the files corrupted with the pixels becoming blurred.

To counteract this problem we downloaded trial versions of conversion software and converted all the files again.  This worked well for all groups minus one: Windows Movie Maker would not recognise all the files saying an 'index' file was missing.  We searched this problem, download additional files but could not fix the problem until it became apparent that the problem was due to all the files being converted at one time rather than one by one with the software: problem solved.

Next minor problem, for one group, was when they imported their files to WMM it would only allow one to import and removed this when another was imported.  Although a minor problem this was a little unusual as normally you see all files that are imported.  To counteract this we simply had to place the files on the storyboard each time they were imported.

Last problem!!!  A diligent student had worked very hard, all alone and without help or fuss, to edit her movie.  It was just about finished when she asked me about saving it as her space on the University would not allow.  Now, the student had imported all her files from a memory stick and I pulled it out!!!  This was not a good move because the computer was still looking for this files from the memory stick and all her hard work was deleted from WMM!!!  I had suddenly made the error that I warn all students about: past the point of no return...

3.  Evaluation of WMM

Looking back at this scenario, many problems would not have occurred if there was a video converter on machines rather than try online or trial versions.  With different cameras being used and different file formats available, it only makes sense to have a reputable conversion software in place to ensure this part of the process flows smoothly.  It can be very frustrating going through this process and things not working and it it technical setbacks like this that may stop many in moving forward with digital movie making.  Having spoken to technical support, we are now getting a converter software to use, Wondershare, for future movie make inputs.  Yes, a bit late for this one but sometimes it is only after events that we reflect and decide what to do to eliminate replication.

The next question that I keep asking myself is 'Why continue to use WMM?'  The latest version is not so easy to use and the current version, that we have on our University machines, is no longer running smoothly without hitches.  Is it time to inverts in a simple child-friendly software, similar to digital blue but one step above, that schools might be using or one that students can introduce into schools?  Part of me says it is time to move on but the other part says use what the majority have on their machines so student teachers can at least try WMM at school rather than not.

Whichever method I decide to employ next WMM session, I need to look at what local schools are using, try different tools out and take into account the benefits and disadvantages of each tool.  It may end up that a varied approach is taken rather than the one shoe fits all method.

If you incorporate WMM into your classroom practice or Local Authority then please let me know how you get around the conversion aspect and what software you use for editing.  Please take into account that the target age group would be for children age 9 - 12 years old.  We already use Digital Blue Software and want to go the next step up.  Look forward to your replies.

Forde, C., McMahon, M. & Reeves, J. (2009). Putting Together Professional Portfolios. London: Sage. Part 2 – Describe/Reflect/Evaluate through Windows Movie Making⤴

from @ TecnoTeach

'A portfolio is a means of structuring, demonstrating and reflecting on your development as a professional.  At the heart of portfolio development is your learning' (Forde, 2009, p,13).

The three elements to examining practice:

Reflection - Why something was undertaken a specific way.
Description - What happened?
Evaluation - How did this affect me?

It is not just examining one's own practice but what we observe and learn from others.  This can be through observing others teaching, attending a lecture or undertaking a CPD course or reading a book or article.  The only difference is, although we can reflect on what we observe or read, it is not until we put this into practice can we truly reflect on how this affects ourselves.

There are times when we reflect and match our learning to specific attainment goals, for example,   Standard for Initial Teacher Education (SITE) or HERA for lecturers at University.  The model of reflecting, describing and evaluating may paint a picture to the reader, however, this picture sometimes requires evidence to substantiate the claims being made.

Using the models presented above, I reflected on a recent Digital Moving Editing process with students that was undertaken last week.

1.  Reflection on Digital Movie Making Editing Process With Students

Small groups of student teachers had completed the filming part of their digital movies and were ready to progress to the Editing process using Windows Movie Maker.  This software was being used as it can be found on the majority of machines in schools, the University has this on their machines and all students have access to this software on their personal computers.

Prior to editing, the movie files required converting from .mp4 to .wmm.  The file were in this format due to using Flip Cameras.  To convert the files the online tool, zamzar.com, was used due to no converter software being on university machines and to show students a possible tool they could use for converting specific files.

2.  Description of What Happened

Converting the files using Zamzar was timely due to the software only allowing one upload at a time.  A link would then be sent to a specified email account to which the converted file could be downloaded.  To save time, students were asked to share this task rather than one student undertake with the whole process taking around 30 - 40 minutes.

In general, all files converted and played in their new .wmm format, however, the problem occurred when we tried to import them into Windows Movie Maker Software.  Some of the files corrupted with the pixels becoming blurred.

To counteract this problem we downloaded trial versions of conversion software and converted all the files again.  This worked well for all groups minus one: Windows Movie Maker would not recognise all the files saying an 'index' file was missing.  We searched this problem, download additional files but could not fix the problem until it became apparent that the problem was due to all the files being converted at one time rather than one by one with the software: problem solved.

Next minor problem, for one group, was when they imported their files to WMM it would only allow one to import and removed this when another was imported.  Although a minor problem this was a little unusual as normally you see all files that are imported.  To counteract this we simply had to place the files on the storyboard each time they were imported.

Last problem!!!  A diligent student had worked very hard, all alone and without help or fuss, to edit her movie.  It was just about finished when she asked me about saving it as her space on the University would not allow.  Now, the student had imported all her files from a memory stick and I pulled it out!!!  This was not a good move because the computer was still looking for this files from the memory stick and all her hard work was deleted from WMM!!!  I had suddenly made the error that I warn all students about: past the point of no return...

3.  Evaluation of WMM

Looking back at this scenario, many problems would not have occurred if there was a video converter on machines rather than try online or trial versions.  With different cameras being used and different file formats available, it only makes sense to have a reputable conversion software in place to ensure this part of the process flows smoothly.  It can be very frustrating going through this process and things not working and it it technical setbacks like this that may stop many in moving forward with digital movie making.  Having spoken to technical support, we are now getting a converter software to use, Wondershare, for future movie make inputs.  Yes, a bit late for this one but sometimes it is only after events that we reflect and decide what to do to eliminate replication.

The next question that I keep asking myself is 'Why continue to use WMM?'  The latest version is not so easy to use and the current version, that we have on our University machines, is no longer running smoothly without hitches.  Is it time to inverts in a simple child-friendly software, similar to digital blue but one step above, that schools might be using or one that students can introduce into schools?  Part of me says it is time to move on but the other part says use what the majority have on their machines so student teachers can at least try WMM at school rather than not.

Whichever method I decide to employ next WMM session, I need to look at what local schools are using, try different tools out and take into account the benefits and disadvantages of each tool.  It may end up that a varied approach is taken rather than the one shoe fits all method.

If you incorporate WMM into your classroom practice or Local Authority then please let me know how you get around the conversion aspect and what software you use for editing.  Please take into account that the target age group would be for children age 9 - 12 years old.  We already use Digital Blue Software and want to go the next step up.  Look forward to your replies.

Forde, C., McMahon, M. & Reeves, J. (2009). Putting Together Professional Portfolios. London: Sage.⤴

from @ TecnoTeach


Chapter 1 - What Is a Portfolio

'a space in which you can plan and reflect in depth on your practice, helping identify your strengths and find ways of building on these' (p.1).

OR

'a collection of materials put together in a meaningful way to demonstrate the practice and learning of an educational practitioner' (p.1).

IT IS NOT

'a random collection of materials and artefacts'.

What is the purpose:

* to illustrate achievements?
* to demonstrate ongoing developments of thinking and practice?
* to collect evidence?
* to provide a vehicle for reflection?

Types of portfolios:

* Course Content - contains items that have significant relevance to a course.
* CPD Portfolio - contains record of professional development with reflections and evaluations.
* Competence-based Portfolio - achievement against specific criteria.
* Accreditation for Prior Learning - contains evidence related to prior learning.
* Project Portfolio - contains resources and reflections of groups related to a specific topic.

There are quite a few similarities and differences between what we place in different types of portfolios that it is easy to get blur the boundaries between the main focus or to use the wrong tool for the job.  In this age where many use blogs and wikis as their electronic means of reflection and evidence, I do question whether the correct tool is being applied for the correct purpose.  How often I have seen wikis being used as a reflective tool in the format of a diary and blogs being used as a place to record evidence when the other way around would be much more beneficial.  Surely as years roll on it is much easier to view an organised wiki to view specific key evidence that trail through a specific tag in a blog and likely so, it is easier to map development by viewing the learning journey in a blog than fish through a wikispace.  

If you are using a blog or a wikispace: what is the purpose of your online space?  Look at the different types and purposes and see if you can reflect on the reason you have either chosen a tool or been asked to use a tool and is it the right tool for the job.  Hopefully by looking at the above key aspects, you will begin to understand the 'why' and 'what' of ePortfolios and the online tools available.  There will be cross-overs and stand-alone moments but at the end of the day the underpinning purpose should be a place to map the development of one's relationship between learning and practice.

My Personal Response:

I originally created this blog, not to illustrate my achievements or collect evidence but to share what I was doing with technology in the classroom with a wider audience where the knowledge of the crowd was far greater than the knowledge of the individual.  By joining the 'community of practice' of my fellow educational bloggers, I could learn from them and reciprocate this knowledge sharing by sharing my ideas through this blog where developments in emerging technologies were at the heart of my reflections.

Over the years, this blog has moved a little towards collecting evidence, however, still has the reflective process and sharing as the main reason for posting.  It has still not, to me, met the purpose of 'illustrating achievement' due to it being my personal reflective area to connect with others and converse rather than just show.  Illustrating my achievement comes primarily through my professional CV or through my personal wikispace that provides more a timeline of events and evidence rather than the reflective process.

So the question is, why am I writing about Portfolios and discussing my blog?  It appears that many use blogs for the purpose of a Portfolio and tag specific aspects of learning.  For me, this is not the purpose of my blog, and like the old saying goes, 'what is one man's meat is another man's poison'.  


Forde, C., McMahon, M. & Reeves, J. (2009). Putting Together Professional Portfolios. London: Sage.⤴

from @ TecnoTeach


Chapter 1 - What Is a Portfolio

'a space in which you can plan and reflect in depth on your practice, helping identify your strengths and find ways of building on these' (p.1).

OR

'a collection of materials put together in a meaningful way to demonstrate the practice and learning of an educational practitioner' (p.1).

IT IS NOT

'a random collection of materials and artefacts'.

What is the purpose:

* to illustrate achievements?
* to demonstrate ongoing developments of thinking and practice?
* to collect evidence?
* to provide a vehicle for reflection?

Types of portfolios:

* Course Content - contains items that have significant relevance to a course.
* CPD Portfolio - contains record of professional development with reflections and evaluations.
* Competence-based Portfolio - achievement against specific criteria.
* Accreditation for Prior Learning - contains evidence related to prior learning.
* Project Portfolio - contains resources and reflections of groups related to a specific topic.

There are quite a few similarities and differences between what we place in different types of portfolios that it is easy to get blur the boundaries between the main focus or to use the wrong tool for the job.  In this age where many use blogs and wikis as their electronic means of reflection and evidence, I do question whether the correct tool is being applied for the correct purpose.  How often I have seen wikis being used as a reflective tool in the format of a diary and blogs being used as a place to record evidence when the other way around would be much more beneficial.  Surely as years roll on it is much easier to view an organised wiki to view specific key evidence that trail through a specific tag in a blog and likely so, it is easier to map development by viewing the learning journey in a blog than fish through a wikispace.  

If you are using a blog or a wikispace: what is the purpose of your online space?  Look at the different types and purposes and see if you can reflect on the reason you have either chosen a tool or been asked to use a tool and is it the right tool for the job.  Hopefully by looking at the above key aspects, you will begin to understand the 'why' and 'what' of ePortfolios and the online tools available.  There will be cross-overs and stand-alone moments but at the end of the day the underpinning purpose should be a place to map the development of one's relationship between learning and practice.

My Personal Response:

I originally created this blog, not to illustrate my achievements or collect evidence but to share what I was doing with technology in the classroom with a wider audience where the knowledge of the crowd was far greater than the knowledge of the individual.  By joining the 'community of practice' of my fellow educational bloggers, I could learn from them and reciprocate this knowledge sharing by sharing my ideas through this blog where developments in emerging technologies were at the heart of my reflections.

Over the years, this blog has moved a little towards collecting evidence, however, still has the reflective process and sharing as the main reason for posting.  It has still not, to me, met the purpose of 'illustrating achievement' due to it being my personal reflective area to connect with others and converse rather than just show.  Illustrating my achievement comes primarily through my professional CV or through my personal wikispace that provides more a timeline of events and evidence rather than the reflective process.

So the question is, why am I writing about Portfolios and discussing my blog?  It appears that many use blogs for the purpose of a Portfolio and tag specific aspects of learning.  For me, this is not the purpose of my blog, and like the old saying goes, 'what is one man's meat is another man's poison'.