Tag Archives: English for speakers of other languages

Adult Learners Week 2020⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

This week is Adult Learners Week 2020 in Scotland. We want to highlight all of the fantastic work that Community Learning and Development (CLD) do to deliver high quality adult learning opportunities across a wider variety of areas. These include social isolation, health and wellbeing, digital inclusion, English as a Second Language (ESOL) , literacies, numeracy/maths, family learning, community inclusion, progression pathways, financial inclusion, personal development and active citizenship. 

  The thing that surprises most people about CLD is the variety of roles and diversity of learning that is covered. People who work in CLD often have a variety of disciplines to cover and ensure they are equipped with the necessary skills and knowledge to provide these. The CLD Standards Council is the professional body for people who work or volunteer in CLD. 

 Adult Literacy & Numeracy in Scotland follows a social practice model. It looks at the skills, knowledge and understanding that a learner has to build on and relates learning to a context within personal, family, working or community life. Provision is offered in a learner centred way and can use real life resources such as bills, letters, newspapers or other household resources to support learning to have a real life context. 

Community based ESOL is delivered by CLD teams across Scotland. Scotland has supported the Syrian Resettlement Scheme in recent years which also links to ESOL provision and wider CLD activity in communities although this can look different in different local authorities.  ESOL learners can come from any country in the world and groups can be made up of a variety of languages and cultures. 

 Community based adult learning in CLD can cover a wide variety of learning opportunities that are intended to be informal, relaxed, friendly opportunities that aim to break down barriers for learners who are hardest to reach. These can be adults with multiple barriers such as mental health, physical health, learning difficulties, alcohol and drug addictions, long term unemployment and social isolation among others. 

CLD Adult Learning covers a variety of areas such as confidence building, health issues, bereavement, life changes (such as divorce, redundancy) focussing on areas of high deprivation where poverty impacts on households and families. 

 CLD is a value-based practice and CLD professionals have committed themselves to the values of self-determination, inclusion, empowerment, working collaboratively and the promotion of adult learning as a lifelong activity. Programmes and activities are developed in dialogue with communities and participants, working particularly with those excluded from participation in the decisions and processes that shape their lives. 

 The focus of CLD in all areas of adult learning are improved life chances for people of all ages, through learning, personal development and active citizenship resulting in  stronger, more resilient, supportive, influential and inclusive communities. 

 The Education Scotland CLD Team works to support the CLD sector in delivering high quality learning opportunities relevant to the communities that are in need. The team supports professional learning across different areas of adult learning in CLD and supports the creation of new policies and strategies. They are keen to share and promote interesting practice that is of interest delivered by CLD workers who work tirelessly to improve the communities and individuals they work with.   

Follow @edscotcld for more information

CLD Response to Covid-19: South Ayrshire⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

South Ayrshire Council ESOL Service

Continuing our case studies on the amazing response of CLD during COVID-19 lockdown, we now want to highlight work from South Ayrshire’s ESOL service.

South Ayrshire Council English for Speakers of other Languages (ESOL) staff within the CLD service, identified several challenges as lockdown was introduced. Firstly, many staff were temporarily redeployed to co-ordinate free-school meal provision, and work alongside staff from other council services to deliver almost 2,800 meals a day. Secondly there was a clear need to maintain contact with the more vulnerable learners including those with mental health issues; and, provide continuity of support for learners working towards accreditation. Thirdly there have been technical challenges presented by staff remote working; upgrading IT infrastructure; and, securing online access for learners in rural areas.

ESOL tutors adapted to provide support for learners via video lessons and online tutorials, and also continue to provide English classes for learners who returned to their country of origin prior to lockdown. ESOL learners were involved in the planning of the learning sessions – including selecting times of delivery and identifying a digital platform they were comfortable using, thus reducing digital and financial barriers.

Tutors routinely translate and provide learners with the latest Government guidelines on shielding, social isolation and keeping safe, as well as all Police Scotland notices, and information issued by schools. Staff maintain a reflective log to capture activities, as well as issues that may be noted under duty of care, such as supporting a learner subjected to domestic abuse and signposting to Women’s Aid.

Local authority officers shared insight to some of the impacts to date. ESOL learners have positively benefited from continuing support provided by their tutors – receiving advice and guidance on aspects of their life affected by the lockdown. For example, signposting new families arriving in Scotland to register for free school meal provision.

Moving to a digital platform enabled the ESOL tutors to work with smaller groups based on the level of learning. This has resulted in increased confidence, with learners creating their own peer support groups out with the sessions. Subsequent peer support networks within the ESOL community have continued to develop. For example, with the support of the ESOL staff, learners now have a support network to source halal food from Glasgow.

Virtual participation is also helping to reduce barriers for parents/carers of school aged children. The ESOL team provides activities for children while their parent/carer takes part in a virtual ESOL session. There is also anecdotal evidence that parents/carers and their children are supporting each another with their learning. Learners have reported that the virtual ESOL support has been vital in keeping up to date with schools and nurseries.

More broadly, staff report positive impacts from working in multi-disciplinary teams delivering bespoke services during lockdown – with strengthened relationships and improved understanding of substantive roles. In addition, there have been positive benefits in staff undertaking professional learning and research while working at home.

South Ayrshire council ESOL service identified a number of areas for consideration looking forward: Issues arising from gaps in learning, social isolation and poor mental health will require sufficiently well-resourced CLD services to aid recovery. The Ayrshire ESOL partnership comprised of South, East and North Ayrshire Council ESOL services and Ayrshire College, has established a model to maximise learner engagement and progression – there may be merit in further examining how to apply this model to other learning pathways – with CLD provision as an entry point.

For more information check out @CLDSouthAyr on twitter

Adult Learners Week 2020 – 5 Days of Celebration⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Scotland’s Learning partnership has organised a week of events to celebrate Adult Learner’s Week 2020 

The 29th celebration of Adult Learners’ Week in Scotland is very
different from our normal programme of activities – social distancing makes getting together a little harder. The lack of technology skills and tools make it all the more challenging, but adult learners across Scotland are still planning on having a good celebration

The Morning Sessions are open to everyone
to join learners and providers. These sessions are from 11.00 – 12.30.
The Afternoon Sessions are specially designed by learners
with learners and for learners only.

Monday 7th September: Let’s Talk Participation                                   

Ten years is a long time, but no time at all. Join us to hear how far we’ve come when we talk about participation. The Learning and Work Institute’s national participation survey has its roots in the early Adult Learners’ Week campaigns so join us for expert input from Sir Alan Tuckett and Dr Fiona Aldridge to find out how things have changed in the last 10 years and talk about what we need to do and meet the Minister for Adult Learning Richard Lochhead. Sign up here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/lets-talk-participation-tickets-116613428905

Tuesday 8th September: Scotland Connects

This year’s Adult Learners’ Week is timed to celebrate with colleagues across the world, connecting with colleagues in Europe and beyond to help develop a world worth living in. Meeting with Cabinet Secretary Michael Russell, Chief Executive Niamh O’Reilly, AONTAS and Edicio Dela Torre, President of the Education for Life Foundation to talk about our learning connections and champions and how we benefit. Sign up here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/scotland-connects-tickets-116618991543

Wednesday 9th September: Adult Learning & Health

Health literacy became extremely important during a pandemic –
Presentations from Lord Nigel Crisp, Co-chair All-Party Parliamentary Group on Global Health; Jason Leitch, National Clinical Director, Scottish Government; Glynne Roberts, Programme Director (Well North Wales); and FALNI, Northern Ireland will delight and inspire us to think about how we better link with health across the country and ensure learning is at its heart. Sign up here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/adult-learning-health-tickets-116621033651

Thursday 10th September: Work and Learning

Adult Learning at work, for work and in work – a day of celebrations and achievements-hearing from some of the great projects people are involved in across the country. Join us for some inspiration and challenge our thinking about work-based learning, learning for work and learning in work. Meet Ed Gibbon from Stirling Council, WEA, James Russell from SDS and Jamie Hepburn, Minister for Business, Fair work and Skills and let’s talk about the role that adult learning can play in the recovery. Sign up here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/work-and-learning-tickets-116622451893

Elevenses Celebration
Adapting to the situation and making changes, meeting online, sending out learning packs, calling people to see if they’re okay we will be sharing cake and a cuppa with learners and providers across Scotland.

CLD Response to Covid-19: North Lanarkshire Council⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Community Learning and Development (CLD) response during COVID -19 lockdown

North Lanarkshire Council – Adult Learning Delivery

Continuing our series of case studies from the West Region on the amazing response of CLD during COVID-19 lockdown we now want to highlight work from North Lanarkshire Council CLD Adult Learning Team.

Across North Lanarkshire Council the CLD Adult Learning Team has continued delivering their CLD service throughout the COVID lockdown period. Initially the CLD staff kept the lines of communication open and established the best way to keep in touch with all learners considering the range of devices being used and the level of learners’ digital involvement. The CLD – Communities and Adult Learning Team looked to ensure that fundamental needs were covered such as information on what was going on, access to food and prescriptions and support for those in isolation.

The speed of response by CLD staff was most impressive and all learners had established contact very early on. The flexible approach took into consideration the position of each individual learner. e.g. WhatsApp groups, Facebook pages, Zoom – all mediums were utilised depending on what learners were best able to engage with reflecting the social practice approach. There also had to be consideration of learners that did not access social media or were not online in anyway. Some learners were contacted by phone and door step drops of learning packs and resources if required. The focus was prioritised around learning and health and well-being.

Highlights:

  • Learning Packs – ALN & ESOL

(Measuring, puzzle books, writing activities, Summer Reading Program)

(ESOL- photo dictionaries, SQA materials, Worksheets)

  • Pivot Garden – Updates posted on progress of newly completed garden and seedlings. Learners were able to access the garden individually and do some upkeep and gardening. Seedlings ‘adopted’ by Community Worker and when established delivered to learners for individual planting.

  • Wednesday Walk – Digital Health Walk – regular timetabled walking activity with theme, promoted via text and social media. Encourages learners to be more physically active and raises awareness of their mental wellbeing. Participants take photos on a positive theme – recent topics have included trees and bees and encouraging mindfulness. Participants then share their photos on social media, increasing their sense of connection. Nature themed topics have been extended with links to materials and activities from Cumbernauld Living Landscapes to encourage further learning.
  • Facebook pages for groups – Motherwell has 3 private Facebook groups set up: Gaelic Culture, Northern Lights Discovery and COLTS Discovery Group.  The learners are able to be in contact with one another and share photographs of their current activities and trips from last term. The Gaelic Culture Group have now set up Facebook Room within their private group; every Tuesday from 1-3pm they meet up for a video chat, practise their language skills together and do a short quiz. One group member who had been housebound over the last term has enjoyed being able to re-join her group online.  The Discovery learners have all kept on track with their activities during lockdown and one learner has just achieved her Silver Award. Wishaw Family History Group have a private Facebook Groups which allows the learners to keep in touch and share photographs of their current family tress and any progress made on their work. The group ‘meet’ weekly for a Facebook video chat: this allows them to socialise with one another, check in with the Support Worker for welfare purposes and share any new findings. Not only has the Facebook group decreased social isolation it has also allowed for learners to learn new IT Skills and explore avenues on social media platforms that they didn’t know existed!
  • ESOL Online -Aimed at ESOL learners and resettlement refugees. Delivered by Community workers, Support workers and Social Work. Ongoing WhatsApp groups where work is posted and a group for information sharing on Covid developments in Arabic & English. Weekly video calls and lessons for each learner. Difficulties were /are mainly which platform to use and longer term the need for a VLE set up for learners to submit work and track progress. Staff need for training in the use of digital online learning platforms and managing of social media.

Adult Literacies and ESOL visit⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

On Tuesday 3rd March and Wednesday 4th March 2020 Education Scotland welcomed colleagues from the Waterford and Wexford Education Board http://waterfordwexford.etb.ie/ in Ireland. They came to Scotland to learn about Adult Literacy and ESOL provision delivered across different providers. 

Education Scotland’s CLD, Parental Engagement and Family Learning team welcomed the visitors and heard about the delivery methods, resources and focus in Ireland. Nicola Sykes, Senior Education Officer, shared information on the regional and national commitments of Education Scotland as well as within the scrutiny directorate. Nicola also gave a background to CLD provision in Scotland, in terms of how it is set up and the role of the CLD Standards Council. 

The programme for the two days was developed with many partners across the West and Forth Valley and West Lothian regions and was a huge success! The adult literacy group visited provision in Clydebank, West Dunbartonshire as well as in Stirling. The local authorities organised for learners, volunteers and staff to be available to share information, resources and knowledge on the delivery methods used in Scotland. The group also met with City of Glasgow College who shared their Community Learning and Development programme, detailing the focus on health and mental health programmes whilst embedding SQA qualifications in delivery.

The ESOL group had a particular focus on SQA ESOL qualifications from ESOL literacies through to ESOL at the different levels available. They met with the ESOL Team at SQA who were able to discuss how the qualifications were developed, including the content, assessment and verification processes required. They also met with Glasgow ESOL Forum, a voluntary organisation who deliver ESOL with embedded SQA’s in various community settings in Glasgow along with North Lanarkshire Council who also embed qualifications into their ESOL provision. North Lanarkshire Council also had a Syrian learner giving a presentation showing his journey over the last three years from arrival, initial English assessments, learning and volunteering opportunities to him now working on an apprenticeship programme.

North Lanarkshire had various partners attend the session such as Voluntary Action in North Lanarkshire, volunteers, befrienders and CLD staff who were able to share their experiences of the partnership approach to the delivery to ensure learners learn English as well as integrate into the community, make connections and progress in their lives independently.

If you would like to hear any more about the visits please contact Laura McIntosh, CLD Development Officer, mailto:Laura.Mcintosh@educationscotland.gov.scot

 

Towards Best Practice in Educating Separated Children⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Scottish Refugee Council, Glasgow Clyde College, Aberlour and Stirling University ran a conference on Wednesday 25 September, the culmination of a year-long project, Towards Best Practice in Educating Separated Children. The aims of the conference were to:

  • To present new research by Stirling University into the educational and language needs of unaccompanied asylum-seeking, refugee and trafficked young people (16-18)
  • To present the views of young people themselves on their education and aspirations; and
  • To promote the Glasgow Clyde College ‘16+ ESOL’ model – rationale, and curriculum and teaching resources.

The 16+ESOL Routes to Learning handbook sets out the approach, curriculum and teaching resources of Glasgow Clyde College’s 16+ESOL programme for separated children (16-18). It is a helpful resource for lecturers and teachers educating separated children in Scotland, the UK and elsewhere, in colleges and schools or in the community as well as other professionals, such as social workers and guardians. Whilst developed for separated children, the resources may be used and adapted in other ESOL, EAL and other language learning settings. A link to further online resources can also be found in the handbook.

The full research report and executive summary can be found here  Towards Best Practice in Educating Separated Children

The live stream footage from the conference in Glasgow on educating separated children is on Youtube (64 mins). It features researchers from Stirling University presenting their findings into Glasgow Clyde College’s 16+ESOL programme, as well as a presentation from two of the lecturers behind the programme.

A film of four young people (9 mins) who have benefited and graduated from the 16+ESOL programme was shown at the conference.

The project was funded by the Glasgow Clyde Education Foundation and Paul Hamlyn Foundation.

An exemplar of the 16+ ESOL programme at Glasgow Clyde College can also be found on the National Improvement Hub.

Regional Working and the CLD Team⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Education Scotland has now moved to a regional delivery model and will support improvement and capacity building at local, regional and national level. CLD members are now part of Regional Teams. Each Regional team is headed up by a Senior Regional Advisor. There are six teams based on the geographies of the six Regional Collaboratives. The work of ES staff is not just limited to the RICs. All Regional teams except the Northern Team have a CLD presence. Team members will be in touch to make contact and find out about local developments.

Tayside Regional Improvement Team (Dundee, Perth and Kinross and Angus) Senior Regional Advisor (acting) –

CLD presence – Susan Epsworth, Development Officer, CLD Susan.Epsworth@educationscotland.gov.scot

South East Regional Improvement Team (Edinburgh City, Fife, Midlothian, East Lothian, Scottish Borders) Senior Regional Advisor – Alistair Brown

CLD presence – Chris Woodness, Education Officer, CLD (secondment) Vince Moore, Development Officer, CLD Vincent.Moore@educationscotland.gov.scot

South West Regional Improvement Team (Dumfries and Galloway, East Ayshire, South Ayrshire and North Ayshire) Senior Regional Advisor – Carol Copstick

CLD presence – Nicola Sykes, Senior Education Officer

Dehra Macdonald, Development Officer, CLD Dehra.Macdonald@educationscotland.gov.scot

Forth Valley and West Lothian Regional Improvement Team (Falkirk, Stirling, Clackmannanshire and West Lothian) Senior Regional Advisor – Jackie Halawi

CLD presence – Lindsay MacDonald, Education Officer, CLD Lindsay.MacDonald@educationscotland.gov.scot

Mandy Watts, Development Officer, CLD Mandy.Watts@educationscotland.gov.scot

West Regional Improvement Team (Glasgow City, East Dunbartonshire, East Renfrewshire, Inverclyde, North Lanarkshire, Renfrewshire, South Lanarkshire and West Dunbartonshire) Senior Regional Advisor – Patricia Watson

CLD presence – John Galt, Education Officer, CLD mailto:John.Galt@educationscotland.gov.scot

Laura Mcintosh, Development Officer, CLD Laura.Mcintosh@educationscotland.gov.scot

Northern Regional Improvement Team (Aberdeen City, Aberdeenshire, Moray, Argyll and Bute, Shetland Islands, Western Isles, Highland, Orkney) Senior Regional Advisor – David Gregory

CLD Meetings and events updates⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

CLD Standards Council

The CLD Standards Council held a successful conference with over 180 members participating actively in a wide variety of workshops with a professional learning focus across a wide spectrum of CLD practice. For more information about their work, visit their website: http://cldstandardscouncil.org.uk/

CLD and STEM

Education Scotland met with colleagues from the Science Centres and Festivals to discuss STEM actions in relation to CLD. We are currently undertaking an audit of science centre and CLD STEM engagement. This information will give a baseline of current activity. Further discussions will take place with CLD, Education Scotland, Scottish Government and Science Centres and Festivals to identify priorities and begin to produce STEM Community Plans.

Newbattle Abbey Adult Learning Conference

The fifth Adult Learning Conference took place in Newbattle Abbey College on the 24th April and delegates came from local authorities, colleges, National Organisations, Higher Education and the Third Sector.  Shirley- Anne Somerville,  Minister for Further Education, Higher Education and Science delivered the Keynote Address and announced grant support from Education Scotland for the Adult Achievement Awards. Joan MacKay, Assistant Director, Education Scotland, invited the audience to help shape the CLD offer in the light of Education Scotland’s new National and Regional responsibilities. Adult Guidance was the theme of the

conference, introduced by Marian Docherty, Principal of Newbattle Abbey College and there were two powerful testimonies from adult learners about their learner journeys and the importance of adult guidance in shaping their futures. Conference delegates agreed recommendations for actions to develop Adult Guidance in Scotland. This Action Plan will be sent to Ms Somerville and the National Strategic Forum for Adult Learning will implement the recommendations once approved by the Minister.

National Youth Work Strategy

The National Youth Work Strategy Group met on 2 May at Youthlink. Key themes arising were how to build on the legacy work of the YOYP and ensure that the new Strategy was reflective of young people’s aspirations and how to make use of evidence from the GUS research to help inform the new Strategy and build a strong evidence base for the future.

Languages in FE and ESOL Practitioner Professional Learning Network

The second meeting of the steering group for the Languages in FE and ESOL Practitioner Professional Learning Network took place at the end of April. This network is being supported by a partnership between the College Development Network, Education Scotland and Scotland’s Centre for Languages.

The Languages and ESOL network supports the learning and teaching of all languages and cultures. Its purpose is to be a national voice for languages and ESOL within FE and the wider community, and to provide a platform for sharing and developing practice in its widest sense. For more information about the work of the steering group, please contact Mandy Watts.

National Strategic Forum for Adult Learning in Scotland Learner Voice Working Group

The National Strategic Forum for Adult Learning is chaired by Education Scotland. The new Learner Voice Pack contains information on the work of this strategic group and case studies from Glasgow Women’s Library, Scottish Book Trust, Stirling Council, Crisis Skylight Edinburgh, Scottish Borders CLD, East Renfrewshire Council, Age Scotland, Airdrie Adult Learners’ Forum  and West Dunbartonshire Learners’ Voice. It is accessible now from the CPD Forum page of i-develop. It will be formally launched at Learning Link Scotland on the 15th May.

Live webcast: DYW – Equalities and Inclusion, 3 Feb 2016⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

RoadmapWhen is it?  Thursday, 3 February, 4 – 5 pm

Who is this for?  Head teachers, teachers,  employers, parents/carers and anyone one else interested/involved  in the development of career education from 3 -18.

Where?  Live on Glow TV

About the Glow Meet:

This interactive session will  bring you key information about the Equality and Inclusion agenda in connection with Developing the Young Workforce.

You will hear from Charlotte Govan, project officer for Improving Gender Balance with a particular focus on STEM career pathways. She will share some of the latest facts and initiatives with you and direct you to resources to help you develop this agenda in your specific context.

The session will also provide an overview of the ‘Modern Apprenticeships for All’ programme delivered by Oumar Akram from BEMIS.

Time will be set aside for you to ask questions about the presentations as well as the wider Developing the Young Workforce agenda.

Hope you can tune in and join us.

SCQF Learner Survey⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The SCQF Partnership is currently undertaking research to evaluate how the SCQF is being used by learners across all areas of education including school, college, university, CLD and those currently in employment. We would like to establish the level of knowledge of the SCQF and how it is being used by learners to make decisions on their learning and plan their learning pathways. We would also like to establish if there have been any changes in the levels of awareness and understanding of the SCQF since we last conducted this research in 2013.

This is the short on-line survey link https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/SCQF_Learners

The closing date is Friday 18 December 2015.