Tag Archives: Education

Research-led learning⤴

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As part of our multi-year lecture recording programme we are funding a special call within the Principal's Teaching Award Scheme for small research projects. It is important that we properly evaluate such a major change to what happens in our learning and teaching environments (physical … Continue reading Research-led learning

Sharing a few notes on #OER18⤴

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I have great intentions to blog all the best experiences I have, but usually end up finding myself massively over-stimulated and therefore barely coherent. In the interests of not forgetting (and reflecting that I *still* haven't finished any of my blog posts from LAK18), I'm … Continue reading Sharing a few notes on #OER18

Digital Education and WordPress: an historical romp for #pressedconf18⤴

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Today myself and Jen Ross took part in the PressEd Twitter conference, brilliantly organised by Pat Lockley and Natalie Lafferty. They had the genius idea of re-mixing the Public Archaeology Twitter conference format and with much heroic cajoling succeeded pulled in over 40 presentations from … Continue reading Digital Education and WordPress: an historical romp for #pressedconf18

New figures on higher education students at Scottish institutions⤴

from @ Engage for Education

New figures have been published today by the Scottish Funding Council examining the higher education sector in Scotland in 2016-17.

Read the key points from the publication:

Commenting on the figures, Further and Higher Education Minister Shirley-Anne Somerville said:

“It is welcome to see in these latest statistics that we have a record number of post-graduate students and increases in both part-time and older learners.

“This Government is determined to make higher education as accessible as possible to everyone in Scotland. We recognise the importance of post-graduate study and providing the opportunities for people to get a higher education qualification later in life. That is why we are enabling even more people to study for a postgraduate qualification in the coming years by expanding access to tuition fee loans and living cost loans to students studying by distance learning.

“What these figures show is that the higher education sector in this country is continuing to go from strength to strength, with colleges playing a vital role in the delivery of many higher education courses across Scotland.”

The post New figures on higher education students at Scottish institutions appeared first on Engage for Education.

Developing the digital skills to change career⤴

from @ Engage for Education

Last week Minister for Further Education, Higher Education and Science Shirley-Anne Somerville visited CodeClan, the UK’s first accredited digital skills academy.

Claire Smith, a graduate of CodeClan’s 16-week software development course, writes about her experiences as a career changer moving into the digital sector.

“After University I was lucky enough to get work in an industry that was relevant to my degree, Japanese Studies. However it didn’t pan out for several reasons. I found myself at a loss as to what to do next, and spent my free time working with a local Food Waste charity. Through this charity’s need to digitise their logistics I became involved in developing an app.

“From there, it was a natural process of wanting to push my skills further so I applied for CodeClan, although this involved some big risks that I had to consider, including money, time commitment and the big question of whether I would be able to get a job after doing the course. But I weighed it up and it seemed worth it.

 

“CodeClan is a 16-week intensive course covering the basics of web development. One thing I knew from the start was that it would not be a spoon-feeding course where your graduation present is a job. It involves your full commitment and pushing your learning further outside of class hours. However, the support of my instructors and teamwork with classmates kept me motivated through the course.

 

“Assignments were handed out daily as well as a mini project to cover each weekend. This led on to group projects, which I loved. The course highlighted that a successful project depends not just on technical knowledge but also learning about Agile methodology and the workflow process. But it’s not all work and no play. I was often in the ping pong room or having a game of Werewolf with other students.

 

“CodeClan organised Employer Sessions, where various companies would come in and give an insight of what it would be like to work for them. And by the end of the course, I had a portfolio covering a range of languages including Ruby, Java and Javascript to aid in getting a job.

 

“CodeClan put a lot of time into creating opportunities to meet employers, and it was through this that I got a job as a Backend Developer at Signal where I’ve  been working for just over a year.

 

“As a Backend Developer, I work mostly in PHP, a language that was not covered by CodeClan. But the experience of picking up various languages in just 16 weeks taught me the skills needed to get going with PHP. After a year working in the industry, I look back on the risk I took and I’m glad I was in the position to take it.

 

“One of the major learning curves I’ve had, and will continue to have, is being comfortable not knowing the answer – and having the curiosity to explore and research until I do. I am also lucky that my curiosity is supported and encouraged by my fellow colleagues. Working in a digital agency like Signal offers plenty of exciting challenges which helps keep me motivated to improve my skills.”

For more information about digital careers in Scotland visit digitalworld.net

The post Developing the digital skills to change career appeared first on Engage for Education.

WordPress LTI Testing: Part 2⤴

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Following on from WordPress LTI Testing: Part 1, the next steps I want to take are to understand better what's in the LTI output from Moodle before I start making changes to code (for the sake of simplicity at the moment I'm going to stick … Continue reading WordPress LTI Testing: Part 2

WordPress LTI Testing: Part 1⤴

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This describes some initial testing of connecting to WordPress from a Moodle VLE instance. Main scenario being tested is Use Case 3 from this post. WordPress LTI Testing: Part 2 - this is what I did after I did the things here. WordPress setup Vanilla … Continue reading WordPress LTI Testing: Part 1

Laying it all out in order to begin⤴

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WordPress, and linking it to a VLE as a blogging tool, using LTI. Please don't hit me with a barrage of comments about why I don't just use WordPress *instead* of a VLE (I'm looking at you in particular Lockley). There are reasons. About 4,500 … Continue reading Laying it all out in order to begin

Research SPLOTs?⤴

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https://twitter.com/projectsoothe/status/948644779352576000 On reading the above, it occurs to me that perhaps we should be rolling SPLOTs into our toolsets for research too. I can see how well the image, video and writing ones could fit with a number of citizen science / crowd sourced research … Continue reading Research SPLOTs?

Behaviour in Scottish Schools Research 2016⤴

from @ Engage for Education

The majority of pupils are well behaved and a credit to their school, according to teachers across Scotland.

Behaviour In Scottish Schools Research (BISSR) 2016 is based on feedback from school staff and provides a picture of behaviour and behaviour management approaches in publicly funded mainstream schools.

 The research shows:

  •  The vast majority of staff in schools report pupils as being generally well behaved. Between 79-99% of staff (ranging from support staff to headteachers) reported that pupils are generally well behaved
  • Most staff gave their own school ethos a high rating (between 86% and 96% of staff reported this)
  • The use of restorative approaches and solution oriented approaches increased between 2012 and 2016
  • Most teachers were confident of their abilities to promote positive relationships and behaviour and to respond to indiscipline in their classrooms

 Deputy First Minister John Swinney said:

“I very much welcome the news that the majority of pupils in our schools are well behaved. We want all our children and young people to behave in a respectful manner, not only to staff but also to one another, and we will continue to work towards making even more progress in this area.

“I would like to thank all our school staff who work hard to promote the positive relationships we want our pupils to aspire to.”

 Councillor Stephen McCabe, COSLA Spokesperson for Children and Young People, said:

“COSLA welcomes the publication of the latest Behaviour in Scottish Schools Research which, as in previous reports, highlights that the vast majority of pupils are well behaved and respectful to their peers and school staff. 

“This is due, in no small part, to the hard work of all staff and pupils in our schools to promote a culture of positive behaviours and I thank them all for contributing to creating that positive ethos. 

We will work with all our partners to make sure that we continue to make progress in this area – for our pupils, families and communities.”

 Tony Rafferty, National Parent Forum of Scotland, said:

“As a parent of an S3 pupil and a member of the National Parent of Scotland, I welcome this comprehensive report. Now all parents will be able to find out what the actual scenario in Scotland is, rather than the perceived situation.”

 Katie Rafferty, Director of respectme, said:

“As Scotland’s national anti-bullying service, respectme welcomes this report and its finding that most staff encounter positive behaviour from pupils all or most of the time. We should however draw lessons from the views of teachers contained within the report about levels of respect and resilience, particularly among primary school pupils. 

“We must ensure that all children and young people experience the positive ethos and cultures within their learning settings that help them reach their full potential. Fundamental to this are relationships that are based on respect; between children and between children and adults.

Ellen Doherty, General Teaching Council Scotland said:

“The General Teaching Council Scotland is always welcoming of research which provides further insight and understanding of the key issues that our registrants face every day and importantly has the potential to impact and the classroom.”

 Larry Flanagan, Educational Institute of Scotland, said:

“Both the research and the report highlight the key role of the teacher-pupil relationship in creating an ethos where positive behaviour can be promoted and negative action, such as bullying, can be challenged.

“Supporting schools by ensuring that adequate resources are in place to allow a focus on relationships to flourish is vital. The EIS is keen to work with other agencies to this end and welcomes the report as a stimulus to action in this area.”

 

The post Behaviour in Scottish Schools Research 2016 appeared first on Engage for Education.