Tag Archives: Early Years

DYW Interesting Practice – Ferguslie – Pre5 Centre: Skills Development in Early Years⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

pwp_2896Fergulsie Pre 5 Centre, this year’s Scottish Education Award winner in the category ‘Employability across Learning’,  provides a skills based learning approach for children from 3 – 5 years, actively seeking to connect learning to the world of work whenever possible.  Through a variety of play contexts and in connection with professionals and local businesses they engage in projects that inspire enterprising attitudes and creativity.  At the same time it introduces children to a range of jobs people hold within the wider community.

pwp_3132Children are at the heart of this approach, influencing the direction of projects by leading the learning.   Some examples include the creation of a ‘dog house’, their business venture, the ‘Rainbow Café’ for the local community and creating a nursery newspaper.

The Tackling Poverty agenda has further motivated staff to support children in developing the necessary skills and confidence to succeed. The opportunities and experiences put ipwp_3552n place in partnership with parents supports the develop of skills for everyone involved ensuring that no matter their stage of development they are equipped to lead their own learning and celebrate their achievements.

Judith Thomas, head of the centre says:  “At Ferguslie Pre-five Centre our children have a natural curiosity about the world around them and we, as a staff, have put an increased emphasis on the development of children’s skills through play.  They engage in projects that develops a depth of learning and to scaffold this, we connect to and work with businesses and professions.  Local schools and colleges also  support the projects children engage in and they understand who can help them achieve.”   Partners and parents make valuable contributions to the curriculum and opportunities to involve the local community in children’s learning are maximised. ”

The holistic approach taken by the centre to developing skills and engaging children in play around the world of work providpwp_2676es inspiration and creative engagement opportunities that fosters positive attitudes for learning, life and work, important stepping stones for career education from 3 – 18.

Hear more about the nursery’s approach to developing skills for learning, life and work employability by accessing the following interview with Judith:

 

Additional resource:

2016 Scottish Learning Festival presentation:  career-education-at-ferguslie-pre-five-centre

Scottish Parent Teacher Council 2016-08-08 15:51:00⤴

from @ Scottish Parent Teacher Council

Some of you may be familiar with Upstart, to others it may sound like something you do to your car to get it going again. Thankfully this blog isn’t about to do a U-turn and become about motoring.

So – to be clear - Upstart is the title of the campaign to introduce a kindergarten stage for children aged three to seven in Scotland.

What do we mean by kindergarten stage? Basically instead of the formal schooling that we are all familiar with from age five, children aged three to seven will have more opportunities to learn through play (especially outdoors); to develop their spoken language and social skills; and to build sound foundations for academic achievement.

Evidence from around the world shows that children under the age of seven benefit from an approach to education that is about experiences, that supports their all-round physical, emotional, social and cognitive development, rather than pushing them towards early academic achievement. 

You may remember an article we shared on Twitter and Facebook a few weeks ago about schools in Finland: http://bit.ly/29hebN2

In fact, in the most recent review by the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD), the three most successful nations in terms of academic results were Finland, Estonia and Switzerland. One thing all three have in common? They all have a play-based kindergarten stage for three to seven year-old children.

Such a radical change in how children are educated may seem intimidating, especially if at first glance it seems to postpone academic development. In actuality, the evidence seems to indicate that there is no educational advantage to an early start. Many studies have shown that children who are taught literacy skills from the age of five don’t do any better in the long run than those who start at seven – performance evens out by the time they reach age ten.
Additionally, some research studies have actually linked an early start in formal education and early pressure for academic achievement to social, emotional and mental health problems as children develop into their teens and adulthood.

People often think of play and work or school as being completely different things, but they are really one and the same. Play combines physical and active learning and if it is properly guided, it can help children develop all the skills they will need to be lifelong learners. Music, art, drama, stories, songs and rhymes develop young children’s listening, language, memory and thinking skills, all needed for good literacy.  


Active, creative play develops the problem-solving skills and understanding of concepts and 
ideas needed for maths and science.

Our next Parent’s Voice survey is going to be about Upstart – we want to know what our members know about Upstart and how they feel about its ideas. In the meantime while the survey is being developed, here is some more in depth information about Upstart and the arguments around it:





Scottish Parent Teacher Council 2016-08-08 15:51:00⤴

from @ Scottish Parent Teacher Council

Some of you may be familiar with Upstart, to others it may sound like something you do to your car to get it going again. Thankfully this blog isn’t about to do a U-turn and become about motoring.

So – to be clear - Upstart is the title of the campaign to introduce a kindergarten stage for children aged three to seven in Scotland.

What do we mean by kindergarten stage? Basically instead of the formal schooling that we are all familiar with from age five, children aged three to seven will have more opportunities to learn through play (especially outdoors); to develop their spoken language and social skills; and to build sound foundations for academic achievement.

Evidence from around the world shows that children under the age of seven benefit from an approach to education that is about experiences, that supports their all-round physical, emotional, social and cognitive development, rather than pushing them towards early academic achievement. 

You may remember an article we shared on Twitter and Facebook a few weeks ago about schools in Finland: http://bit.ly/29hebN2

In fact, in the most recent review by the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD), the three most successful nations in terms of academic results were Finland, Estonia and Switzerland. One thing all three have in common? They all have a play-based kindergarten stage for three to seven year-old children.

Such a radical change in how children are educated may seem intimidating, especially if at first glance it seems to postpone academic development. In actuality, the evidence seems to indicate that there is no educational advantage to an early start. Many studies have shown that children who are taught literacy skills from the age of five don’t do any better in the long run than those who start at seven – performance evens out by the time they reach age ten.
Additionally, some research studies have actually linked an early start in formal education and early pressure for academic achievement to social, emotional and mental health problems as children develop into their teens and adulthood.

People often think of play and work or school as being completely different things, but they are really one and the same. Play combines physical and active learning and if it is properly guided, it can help children develop all the skills they will need to be lifelong learners. Music, art, drama, stories, songs and rhymes develop young children’s listening, language, memory and thinking skills, all needed for good literacy.  


Active, creative play develops the problem-solving skills and understanding of concepts and 
ideas needed for maths and science.

Our next Parent’s Voice survey is going to be about Upstart – we want to know what our members know about Upstart and how they feel about its ideas. In the meantime while the survey is being developed, here is some more in depth information about Upstart and the arguments around it:





How Good Is Our Early Learning and Childcare? – Draft QIs Consultation⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

IMG_20150129_140554

Effective self-evaluation is the cornerstone of how we effect improvement in learning. There is a great deal of experience in the Early Learning and Childcare (ELCC) sector in using the Quality Indicators (QIs) in Child at the Centre to bring about those improvements. However, since its publication in 2007, there have been a number of significant developments in Scottish education. It is important therefore, that tools to support self-evaluation and self-improvement in ELCC reflect the most up-to-date thinking about how young children best develop and learn.

So, the suite of QIs for the Early Learning and Childcare sector is under review.

The new suite of indictors to be called, How Good Is Our Early Learning and Childcare? (HGIOELCC) will be published in May/June 2016; and, will mirror the framework of the recently published How Good Is Our School? (4th edition).

Over the past few months, the Children and Families team at Education Scotland has been working with stakeholders to produce a first draft of QIs.

So what happens now?

We’ve created a special section on our website for you to view a set of draft QIs and to make comment via Survey Monkey.

The first round of drafts includes:
1.2 Leadership of Learning
2.2 Curriculum
3.2 Securing Children’s Progress

The set of QIs can also be viewed inside Glow Early Learn. We are keen to hear your views via Glow using #hgioelcc.

Of course, Child at the Centre (2007), still has relevance, providing support to early learning and childcare (ELCC) settings and primary schools to look inwards, to scrutinise their work and evaluate what is working well for learners and to decide what could be better.

Make sure you don’t miss out on this opportunity to have your say about how well the new suite of QIs is shaping-up.

Bookbug – it’s time for you to have your say!⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Scottish Book Trust would like to know what professionals think about the Bookbug programme. To do this, our friends at Scottish Book Trust have designed an online survey for you to complete.

BookBugBedtimeCMYK

The Bookbug programme is currently being evaluated by researchers from the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships, based at the University of Edinburgh. The evaluation is investigating what difference Bookbug makes to parents, children and early years professionals. As part of this evaluation Scottish Boko Trust has developed an online survey for professionals whose work supports the delivery of Bookbug bags or Bookbug sessions.

Bookbug Session

The survey will provide for Scottish Book Trust an overview of professionals’ views and experiences of the Bookbug Programme. In addition, findings from the survey will be used to help identify areas for further exploration in four case study areas for evaluation in 2016.

The survey will take between 20-25 minutes to complete, depending on the level of detail that you provide. Scottish Book Trust is really keen to hear your views, so just give as much detail and information as you can in the time you have available.

To thank you for your participation, Scottish Book Trust is giving one lucky participant chosen at random a bundle of books worth £100 .

Bookbug professionals 2

It is really important that we all do our bit to ensure that programmes such as Bookbug are developed to meet the needs of the children, families and staff across Scotland. Please take some time to complete the survey and make sure you send the this link on to colleagues in your organisation and/or locality who have contact with Bookbug.

https://edinburgh.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/bookbug-evaluation

The closing date for the survey is Friday 27th November 2015.

Don’t miss out!

How good is our school? – Increasing creativity⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

what are creativity skills piece 1

How good is our school? provides a suite of quality indicators that support staff in all sectors to scrutinise their work and evaluate what is working well for learners and what could be better. It is a key aspect of the Scottish approach to school improvement and supports self-evaluation and reflection by practitioners at all levels.

 

The 4th edition was launched at this year’s Scottish Learning Festival and features a new quality indicator – Increasing creativity and employability - that will help schools across Scotland to embed progression in skills for learning, life and work in young people’s learning.. To support this, Education Scotland’s Creativity Team have developed two new infographics that can help you quickly understand What are creativity skills?, and identify the national and local support to Unlock your creativity. The infographics can be printed and shared freely.

 

Join the Creativity Professional Learning Community on Glow or visit the Education Scotland website for more information.

what are creativity skills sharableunlock your creativity sharable

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) – Free event for education professionals⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

FASD

Free Event for Education Professionals

10.00 – 15.00

17 November 2015

COSLA, Edinburgh, 19 Haymarket Yards, Edinburgh, EH12 5BH

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is the leading known preventable cause of permanent learning disability worldwide and is caused by maternal use of alcohol during pregnancy. Affected children can have a wide range of physical, growth and neurobehavioural problems which impact on their everyday lives and limit their independence.  Often teachers are the first professional to notice a child has difficulties.

As part of a programme of events over the last 4 years, the Scottish Government has arranged a free event for nursery and primary school teachers. The event’s keynote speaker is Dr Ana Hanlon-Dearman – a Developmental Paediatrician from the Manitoba FASD Centre in Canada. The Scottish Government has worked closely with Dr Hanlon-Dearman in moving FASD forward in Scotland. Dr Hanlon-Dearman has a wealth of experience working with schools in Manitoba, and will be discussing their work supporting children and young people, as well as tools that have proved successful.

For further information or to book a space on the event, please contact Jamie.garden@gov.scot 0131 244 4634.

Numeracy and Mathematics Resources⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

National Numeracy and Mathematics HubESLogohub

 

The National Numeracy and Mathematics Hub is a virtual learning environment for all practitioners. The Hub provides an innovative approach to career-long professional learning for all practitioners in all sectors. It is an interactive, virtual learning environment which offers practitioners:

  • Professional learning in different aspects of numeracy with a focus on progression, numeracy and mathematics skills, numeracy across learning, assessment and moderation and teaching.
  • Career-long professional learning opportunities of various types such as broadcasts, professional reading and action research.
  • An easy to use environment where you can share and work with colleagues from across Scotland as well as those from your own school or authority​.

Education Scotland website:

http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/learningandteaching/curriculumareas/mathematics/index.asp

http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/learningandteaching/learningacrossthecurriculum/responsibilityofall/numeracy/index.asp

Provides practitioners with excellent resources and guidance to help develop learning and teaching in Numeracy and Mathematics including;

 National Numeracy Progression Frameworkprogression – This resource has been created to deepen practitioners’ knowledge and understanding of progression within the experiences and outcomes for numeracy and mathematics. It included progression pathways with key milestones and building blocks for each of the numeracy organisers. Mathematics pathways coming soon, along with previous knowledge and understanding and exemplification.

Professional Learning Resources – These professional learning resources provide guidance and advice to help inform learning and teaching practices in line with the main objectives of the Scottish Survey of Literacy and Numeracy (SSLN). There are PLR’s for;

http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/learningandteaching/curriculumareas/mathematics/index.asp

Other key links and websites to support the development of Numeracy and Mathematics;

Numeracy in Social Studies

Higher Order Thinking

Skills in Maths

There is also information on Assessing progress and achievement available which includes professional learning activities and key documents on significant aspects of learning and making good assessment decisions.

The Journey to Excellence: Examples of innovative and interesting practice. Search ‘mathematics’ or ‘numeracy’ in to the search facility.

TWIG Film list for National 4 and National 5 Qualifications

TWIG Films from website

stem logoSTEM Links

STEM e-bulletin   http://bit.ly/STEMeBulletin

(Up to date news, information, resources and professional learning)

STEM Central in MOTION blog   http://bit.ly/BlogSTEM

(more up to date news on STEM)

STEM Central website http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/stemcentral/

(high quality resources, teaching ideas, videos etc to develop learning experiences relating to sciences, technologies, engineering and mathematics

Main Contact for Numeracy and Mathematics Team at Education Scotland:

Lorna Harvey, Senior Education Officer

Optima Building, 58 Robertson Street

Glasgow

G2 8DU

Tel: 0141 282 5119             lorna.harvey@educationscotland.gsi.gov.uk

 

 

Invitation to evaluate ‘Recognising and Realising Children’s Rights’ resource⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

RRCR-banner

Recognising and Realising Children’s Rights is a professional development resource which was developed by Education Scotland and launched in September 2013. The stated aims of this resource are to:

  • raise awareness and develop knowledge/understanding of the UNCRC;
  • individuals and establishments to self-evaluate their practice in light of the UNCRC;
  • support improvement planning within establishments;
  • support children to know, understand and claim their rights.

Education Scotland would like to engage colleagues in evaluating the effectiveness and impact of this resource, and would appreciate your contribution to this evaluation.

The findings will be used to evaluate the current resource and to inform future developments. It should only take a few minutes to complete and all contributions will remain anonymous.

Click here to complete the evaluation.

The Secret Life of Numbers⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Welcome to the first of a number of posts that explores research in the learning of numeracy and mathematics.

If you have a Glow username, you can contribute to the discussion on our Numeracy & Mathematics Community.

Title Marcus Du Sautoy

The Secret Life of Numbers

Author

 Marcus Du Sautoy

Available online at: http://www.theguardian.com/education/2009/jun/23/maths-marcus-du-sautoy

Summary

The author argues that teachers of mathematics are ‘required to teach a utilitarian and unadventurous curriculum that leaves them no room to explore the creative side of the subject’. He suggests alternative approaches to teaching mathematics that he believes will help learners see mathematics as exciting and imaginative.

Reflective questions

Hint : The link below will take you to the discussion on Glow

Du Sautoy, M. (2009). The secret life of numbers