Tag Archives: E-Safety

Fake, Fiction or Fact? How can learners be helped to work out what’s true?⤴

from @ ICT for Teaching & Learning in Falkirk Primary Schools

There are so many choices for sources of news for learners to find out about what’s going on the world today, whether printed media, online news sites or social media. But how can learners be helped to be able to work out if what they are reading has any substance in fact, how accurate the information is, or what the biases are likely to be?

How can you spot fake news?

howtospotfakenewsinfographicHow to Spot Fake News – the IFLA (the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions), with thanks to www.factcheck.org, created an infographic detailing steps we can all take when trying to work out if what we are reading, hearing or watching is verifiable. This helps teach the skills of critical thinking and media literacy. This describes with visual representation 8 steps to take to help determine the likely authenticity of shared information: to consider the source, to read beyond the headline, the check credibility of the author, to look at linking sources, to check the date to see if current, to research to see if it’s satire, to consider your own biases and the likely ones of the source sharing the information, and to consult fact-checking sites. The infographic is available to download as either an image or in pdf format for printing.

takkfakenewsliteracy

Digital Literacy and “Fake News” – Resources to Help you help your students – many links collated by librarian-turned-technology-specialist Nancy Watson @nancywtech which help teachers guide their learners through ways to spot fake news and techniques to work out the authenticity of the shared information. The links include sites aimed at different age groups, teachers, younger learners, as well as for general public use. They include fact-checking sites as well as tips and advice to determining reliability of what is shared.

nwfakenewsepidemicDigital Literacy and the “Fake News” EpidemicNancy Watson has produced a superb resource for educators sharing a host of advice, tips and resources to support teachers support their learners to better be able to be discerning about the information shared online or in the print media. This includes examples of fake news and outlines the steps anyone can take to determine it to be factually inaccurate.

nprfakeorrealFake or real? How to self-check the news and get the facts – a post by digital news intern Wynne Davis describing the issue of fake news and giving practical advice for all ages about how to help determine whether what you are reading is true or fiction. Tips include checking the domain name (especially similar-sounding names), looking at quotations in the story (and checking up on who they are and anything known about them online), searching the quote itself to see if it properly attributed or taken out of context, check the comments to get a flavour of whether others call out the facts as being untrue and cite sources to back up their claims, reverse image search (right click on an image online and choose to search Google for it to see where else it is used and the context in which it is used).

Internet Archive and Wayback Machine

internetarchiveWouldn’t it be great if, when someone says content has changed on a website, or disappeared completely, that there was a way to look back at what was there beforehand? Well, The Internet Archive saves a huge amount of online content from many sources around the web (several hundred billion webpages!). This relies on the Wayback Machine (which is part of the Internet Archive) trawling on a regular basis for changed content. So if you search for a website and it is no longer available you can pop the weblink into the Wayback Machine (which is part of The Internet Archive) and look back at previous versions just by choosing a specific date. It will only be available for dates on which a trawl was made so is not available for every date but it’s still very impressive to be able to look at a website change over time and to be able to compare and contrast with versions over time.

savepagenowCan you save a web page on Wayback machine so it’s always there for future reference? Yes you can! You can simply capture a web page as it appears now for future use as a trusted citation in the future, or just to ensure it does not disappear when the original website changes or disappears. All you do is paste the weblink when you first find it on the Save Page Now” part of the Internet Archive site.

Fact-checking sites

There are a number of sites which can be used to verify whether stories (particularly those which appear on social media and spread like wildfire) have any basis in fact or whether they are urban myths, or out and out lies or propaganda. These include Politifact, Snopes, and Factcheck.org

Do you think you read with your bias? What bias does the writer have?

biasesaffectingusallBiases which affect us all – an infographic created by Business Insider which lists and describes 20 biases which we can all have when we read, hear or share information. Whether it’s a tendency to have a reliance on the first piece of information we hear, whether we are influenced by hearing the same information shared by a group, whether the information confirms what we already believed, stereotyping, or information which implies cause and effect, or many more – this infographic provides a useful starting point for discussing with learners the range of influences on us all when we all read or hear information.

 

Learners engaging with their learning with Yammer⤴

from @ ICT for Teaching & Learning in Falkirk Primary Schools

YammerlogoYammer – so what is it and why use in school?

Yammer is an online discussion/collaboration tool which provides schools with a secure online environment where all pupils in a class can ask questions of their peers, where they can seek answers and help each other, bounce ideas around and deepen their own understanding of what they are learning in class. It is available to all users of Office 365 for Education, meaning all Glow users, pupils and staff, have access to this tool. And it can be accessed by signing in online in a browser or using a mobile device app.

Yammer provides an ideal tool through which learners can learn about the use of social media, in a protected environment, where the pupils can be guided to model behaviours for use in an online discussion tool, which will apply to any social media tool pupils may meet outwith their schooling. So if a teacher is looking to help pupils learn about safe sharing, and what not to share online, being supportive and respectful of views of others, and a place for pupils to engage in deepening their understanding through questioning and responding to others, then Yammer provides a great environment for a school.

yammeronwaffleHow do pupils and teachers get started using Yammer?

  1. Glow users simply sign into Glow then navigate to any part of Office 365, such as the tile for Office 365 (School Site) and then click on the 9-square waffle icon to navigate to the range of tools available in Office 365 – and choose the Yammer tile.
  2. The very first time a user clicks on the Yammer tile they will be invited to invite further users – don’t invite others but instead just close that window (click on the greyed-out cross at the top-right or click on the background page behind the invitation panel.
  3. You will be presented with the terms of use of Yammer – read these and then click on the button to acknowledge you agree to abide by them.
  4. You’re then in Yammer and can start browsing some of the Yammer groups open to all users. Or, if a pupil is ready to join the private class Yammer group set up by their teacher, then the first time the pupil simply searches for the class group name, clicks on the link and requests to join by clicking on the “join group” button – that sends a message to the teacher who accepts their pupils into the group.

Alternatively, rather than go to Glow first, users can search with an online search engine for Yammer or go straight to https://www.yammer.com where they can then simply log in using their Glow/Office 365 email address and password.

How do you set up a Yammer group just for pupils and teachers in a class?

  1. A class teacher can quickly set up a private class group in Yammer. Click on “+ Create a new group” and then give the group a name – include in the group name something which identifies the school as well as the class name.
  2. Choose “Private – Only approved members” and untick the box which gives the option to “List in Group Directory” – that way only pupils who know what to search for will be able to find a teacher’s Yammer class group, and only pupils who the teachers knows are members of their class will be granted access by the teacher. Setting up that way avoids the teachers having to add a list of usernames – they simply tell their class what to search for, and to click on the “join group” button when they find the group.
  3. A teacher can see the list of pupils waiting to be added to their class yammer group by going into the Yammer group and then clicking on “Members” at the right-hand side. This will show which users have requested access and are pending approval by the teacher.
  4. It would be recommended to have additional teacher colleagues added as joint administrators – beside their name on the list of members just click on the cog icon and select “Make admin” to elevate that teacher to be a joint administrator of that Yammer group.

What can you do in a Yammer discussion?

You can ask questions, respond to requests from others, add comments or create polls to garner views of others. Attachments can be added to any discussion post – so pupils can perhaps discuss or share comments about a resource. You can even use the “praise” button to acknowledge the input of other users. A Yammer group provides a place to share resources, and links to related sites elsewhere.

How are schools using Yammer?

KirknewtonPSKirknewton Primary School in West Lothian has provided an excellent description of how they are using Yammer with pupils. This blogpost gives screenshots of different aspects to how they use Yammer, as well as the rationale to the choice of tool and the purposes behind it to better support learning and teaching. This has included using Yammer to support collaborative writing. Mrs Anderson, Principal Teacher at the school said “As a teacher and parent I feel that it is very important that we educate children about the safe use of social media – using Yammer has been a fantastic way to do so, in a safe environment. Feedback from parents has been positive.” “The impact on learning and teaching is evident in the content of the group and the enthusiasm of pupils (which is evident in the online interactions).” 

https://blogs.glowscotland.org.uk/glowblogs/glowgallery/portfolio/kirknewton-primary-school-sharing-approaches-to-glow-yammer/

BearsdenPSBearsden Primary School in East Dunbartonshire – teacher Athole McLauchlan describes in at this link about the use of Yammer with pupils in the school https://blogs.glowscotland.org.uk/glowblogs/glowgallery/portfolio/using-yammer-as-a-social-media-channel-for-learners-and-learning/

 

What safeguards are in place for Yammer users in Glow?

Yammer groups can be set up to be private (such as for a class of pupils so that the Yammer group can only be accessed by pupils in that class with their teachers). There are also Yammer groups open to users across Glow and educators within Glow nationally act as Moderators for Yammer users, welcoming new users, helping guide users to use appropriate language in a supportive way.

Everything in Yammer is identifiable to the individual user. There is a simple “report a concern” option for all users (either use the question mark icon on a page or anywhere you see a “Report a concern” button) which will alert the national Glow administrators to concerns raised, and who will provide the support required to resolve any issues.

There’s also a filter to ensure inappropriate language can’t accidentally be posted.

And of course the educational-focussed environment shared between learners and educators means there is a visible supportive environment. Users can set email alerts either to all posts in a specific Yammer group, or to individual posts where alerts would be sent for replies or comments just to that post.

MobileAppsYammer Mobile App

Yammer has an app for mobile devices – search on the app store for your device. Then once downloaded simply log in with your Glow/Office 365 email address (that’s where your Glow username has @glow.sch.uk added to the end, after your Glow username). For many users the use of the app will be the most convenient way to access Yammer.

What help is available?

Day One Guide for the Glow Yammer Network (accessed using Glow account – but also available as a document download from the public-access site Yammer Guide for Glow Users) – a very helpful guide of do things to do, and things to avoid, as well as guides to getting the most out of Yammer, specially in the early stages of getting used to using Yammer in a school.

Yammer Guide for Glow Users – a Glow-specific help guide to getting started with the use of Glow. This includes guidance and suggestions for managing Yammer in an educational context.

So how are you using Yammer in your school?

Do share in the comments below how Yammer is being used in your school

 

 

Safer Internet, Responsible Use Guidelines⤴

from

EMPPC – Safer Internet Responsible Use Guidelines – 9-02-15 (v1 2) The vision  is “To enable all individuals, organisations, both private and public and the community as a whole to develop an ethos of digital citizenship that leads to a safe and responsible use of internet accessible technology”. This document represents a partnership of sharing … Continue reading Safer Internet, Responsible Use Guidelines

Young People’s Promises⤴

from @ Highland E-Safety

The brilliant annual Safer Internet Day took place in February this year, the team behind it have launched this great video of young people’s promises. This can be an activity for any group to recreate with adults too. Everyone of course has a role in creating a safer internet! Well done though to the UK Safer Internet Centre.

#Up2Us, a film made by over 150 schoolchildren about their online experiences – both good and bad – which aims to inspire young people across the UK to do something kind online this Safer Internet Day. The film features children from schools across England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland and will be premiered at events across the UK 


Young People’s Promises⤴

from @ Highland E-Safety

The brilliant annual Safer Internet Day took place in February this year, the team behind it have launched this great video of young people’s promises. This can be an activity for any group to recreate with adults too. Everyone of course has a role in creating a safer internet! Well done though to the UK Safer Internet Centre.

#Up2Us, a film made by over 150 schoolchildren about their online experiences – both good and bad – which aims to inspire young people across the UK to do something kind online this Safer Internet Day. The film features children from schools across England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland and will be premiered at events across the UK 


Viral Pictures as an E-Safety Activity⤴

from @ Highland E-Safety

 

Pic

In Highland, we’re in the process of revamping a number of our E-Safety activities and resources guidance. Rather than focus on some key resources we’re putting the emphasis on Digital Literacy Skills linked to significant aspects of learning. Skills that can underpin lifelong behaviours and habits no matter what platforms or faddy apps come and go. We particularly like some of the progression frameworks that are provided in the 360 degree safe tool.

One activity we will not be recommending that teachers carry out is the ‘please like this picture and share it so my  class can see how far it goes’ activity. Why? Well here’s a few thoughts… Approaches that emphasise that privacy settings are not a safeguard for inappropriate content or guaranteed confidentiality still remain key. However, although this is a well intended activity, it really does not facilitate the development of essential skills, it is more of a shock based approach, but it is flawed from the outset.

The image comes with an explicit plea / suggestion / command to ‘like and share’, friends, friends of friends etc will naturally feel more compelled to share  – it therefore really does not present a meaningful example of a photo being liked and shared on its own merit. To that end it’s a bit like the old fashioned chain letter. If you want an example of something genuinely going unintentionally viral just look at the recent black and blue / white gold image.

The activity has the potential to cause distress and upset to the teacher as the picture as this recent example highlights. It is a reminder that pictures can be augmented yes, but no educational activity should ever place a teacher or educational professional in a situation of distress.

As part of our approach we ask everyone to become good role models, everyone has a role in creating a safer internet, not contributing to ever increasing unnecessary spam type reposts furnishing the ever present echo chambers that many news feeds have become. The idea that technology can offer opportunities for learners to be creative, develop their own individuality and content is much much more exciting.

Thanks to Simon Finch (Digitally Confident) for kicking off these discussions.


Viral Pictures as an E-Safety Activity⤴

from @ Highland E-Safety

 

Pic

In Highland, we’re in the process of revamping a number of our E-Safety activities and resources guidance. Rather than focus on some key resources we’re putting the emphasis on Digital Literacy Skills linked to significant aspects of learning. Skills that can underpin lifelong behaviours and habits no matter what platforms or faddy apps come and go. We particularly like some of the progression frameworks that are provided in the 360 degree safe tool.

One activity we will not be recommending that teachers carry out is the ‘please like this picture and share it so my  class can see how far it goes’ activity. Why? Well here’s a few thoughts… Approaches that emphasise that privacy settings are not a safeguard for inappropriate content or guaranteed confidentiality still remain key. However, although this is a well intended activity, it really does not facilitate the development of essential skills, it is more of a shock based approach, but it is flawed from the outset.

The image comes with an explicit plea / suggestion / command to ‘like and share’, friends, friends of friends etc will naturally feel more compelled to share  – it therefore really does not present a meaningful example of a photo being liked and shared on its own merit. To that end it’s a bit like the old fashioned chain letter. If you want an example of something genuinely going unintentionally viral just look at the recent black and blue / white gold image.

The activity has the potential to cause distress and upset to the teacher  as this recent example highlights. It is a reminder that pictures can be augmented yes, but no educational activity should ever place a teacher or educational professional in a situation of distress.

As part of our approach we ask everyone to become good role models, everyone has a role in creating a safer internet, not contributing to ever increasing unnecessary spam type reposts furnishing the ever present echo chambers that many news feeds have become. The idea that technology can offer opportunities for learners to be creative, develop their own individuality and content is much much more exciting.

Thanks to Simon Finch (Digitally Confident) for kicking off these discussions.


New TUK Resources⤴

from @ Highland E-Safety

TUKBRAND NEW CEOP RESOURCE: The Thinkuknow Toolkit

 

On behalf on CEOP and the Thinkuknow Team

We’re delighted to announce the launch of the Thinkuknow Toolkit, with fifteen fun, engaging learning activities based on the 11-13 and 14+ areas of the website.

The Toolkit helps you transform the Thinkuknow website from a reference tool into an interactive resource. With clear practitioner guidance and engaging photocopiable learning materials, each activity gets young people thinking and talking about key issues related to sex, relationships and the internet, delivers safety messages, and encourages them to return to the website in their own time.

Topics include sexting, webcam, using social networks, inappropriate content and chatting with strangers online. Young people ‘speed friend’ fictional characters before finding out who they have really contacted online; debate the rights and wrongs of a media story about a celebrity whose nude selfies were leaked online; and design their own apps to help their peers stay safe.

You can download the Thinkuknow Toolkit now! You’ll find it under the Key Stage 3/4 tab in the Resources section of your online account atwww.thinkuknow.co.uk/teachers/resources.

Don’t forget you’ll find plenty more resources for use with children and young people aged 5 to 17, and with parents, at thinkuknow.co.uk/teachers.


New TUK Resources⤴

from @ Highland E-Safety

TUKBRAND NEW CEOP RESOURCE: The Thinkuknow Toolkit

 

On behalf on CEOP and the Thinkuknow Team

We’re delighted to announce the launch of the Thinkuknow Toolkit, with fifteen fun, engaging learning activities based on the 11-13 and 14+ areas of the website.

The Toolkit helps you transform the Thinkuknow website from a reference tool into an interactive resource. With clear practitioner guidance and engaging photocopiable learning materials, each activity gets young people thinking and talking about key issues related to sex, relationships and the internet, delivers safety messages, and encourages them to return to the website in their own time.

Topics include sexting, webcam, using social networks, inappropriate content and chatting with strangers online. Young people ‘speed friend’ fictional characters before finding out who they have really contacted online; debate the rights and wrongs of a media story about a celebrity whose nude selfies were leaked online; and design their own apps to help their peers stay safe.

You can download the Thinkuknow Toolkit now! You’ll find it under the Key Stage 3/4 tab in the Resources section of your online account atwww.thinkuknow.co.uk/teachers/resources.

Don’t forget you’ll find plenty more resources for use with children and young people aged 5 to 17, and with parents, at thinkuknow.co.uk/teachers.


Going to Uni? New resources⤴

from @ Highland E-Safety

swgfl

From our friends at the South West Grid for Learning

Many young adults are now looking forwards to going onto University representing a momentous occasion in their lives, often coupled with leaving home and signifying their first real taste of independence.

The internet will play an integral part in this transition, both in terms of socialising and learning, however some will face online issues such as cyberbullying and trolling, protecting their reputation and their privacy online.  Very often, these situations are compounded as the support systems they have relied upon in school are not as readily available to them anymore.

 With this in mind, The South West Grid for Learning have created some brand new fact sheets that Universities can adopt and share with their student communities. These are designed to provide some useful tips and links and above all provide some food for thought for students to consider their online behaviour and its consequences.