Tag Archives: Dyslexia

Lyla: “If I wasn’t dyslexic I wouldn’t be me, I am what you see”⤴

from @ Reach

Did you know that 1 in 10 people are thought to be dyslexic in some way? That means that over half a million people in Scotland have dyslexia. The word ‘dyslexia’ is a tricky one to spell. The word comes from the Greek and it means ‘difficulty with words’. Dyslexia effects everyone in different ways, but basically it means that you may need help with reading, writing, spelling and sometimes speaking too. People with dyslexia have amazing talents. You only have to look at lists of famous people with dyslexia to realise how the right support can help people with dyslexia achieve incredible things: the actress Keira Knightley, the chef Jamie Oliver, the businessman Sir Richard Branson…. the list goes on.

Another talented person with dyslexia is Lyla, a pupil from Mearns Castle High School who won the Scottish Youth Poetry Slam for this awesome poem. Read it below, or check out Lyla perform the poem in this Facebook video.  

My name is Lyla

I love lots of drama, and everyday I am curious

But when I was seven I was diagnosed with something more serious

It sometimes muddles up my words when I write

I can’t read small writing

I don’t really care if people find out… I’m dyslexic.

I find Math and English a wee bit hard

My mum’s dyslexic but she mastered her dream in spite of it.

Being dyslexic can really suck, but if I really try that little bit harder I will master my dream so never give up

Memory is the worst for me I can’t remember much but if I really try like in this poem I really can succeed with a bit of luck

I’m dyslexic as I said before

I don’t care if people find out

If I wasn’t dyslexic I wouldn’t be me I am what you see.

 

A big thank you to Lyla for letting us share her poem. 

If you’ve got dyslexia, Dyslexia Scotland are there for you to help and listen to you. 

And of course, you can contact us if you want to find out about your rights to support at school. 

 

The post Lyla: “If I wasn’t dyslexic I wouldn’t be me, I am what you see” appeared first on Reach.

Just found out you’ve got dyslexia? Get advice from young people who know how you’re feeling….⤴

from @ Reach

This letter has been written by 2 pupils who wanted to offer advice to any young people who may have just found out that they are also dyslexic. 

Dear friend,

Don’t worry. It might be a bit of a shock to find out that you are dyslexic. However, some of the smartest people in the world are dyslexic. Did you know that Johnny Depp from Pirates of the Caribbean is dyslexic? Also Lewis Hamilton, the Formula One driver. Richard Branson is a millionaire and owner of Virgin T.V, Virgin airlines, Virgin money and lots of other businesses. Not only is he smart but he is also dyslexic.

There are lots of things that you can use to help you with your learning. Your school, family and friends can help. Some of the things we use are coloured reading rulers or tinted glasses. You can use computers to help you search for information or for writing. There are lots of dyslexia friendly games you can use and dyslexia friendly books.

Don’t be embarrassed about telling friends and family. The more people who know, the more people can help. The same at school. If teachers know they can help and give you suitable work.

Thanks for reading this. We hope this has helped you,

From Joshua and Alistair.

If you’re a young person with dyslexia, you can get in touch with Dyslexia Scotland on 0344 800 8484 or email helpline@dyslexiascotland.org.uk . There’s also some good advice and info on the Dyslexia Scotland website, including how to get your voice heard. 

This letter was in Dyslexia Scotland’s publication Young Persons’ Dyslexia Voice. Many thanks to the young writers Joshua Geddes and Alastair MacDonald for letting us feature it on Reach.Scot 

The post Just found out you’ve got dyslexia? Get advice from young people who know how you’re feeling…. appeared first on Reach.

Office Lens….through a lens!⤴

from @ The H-Blog

It’s been a while since I blogged (a freshly minted child and 2 house moves will do that kind of thing to you….) but I saw something this week that made me think “People need to know about that. I should stick it on my blog.” Given how inactive I’ve been on here for so long, there may be a fundamental flaw in my logic there, but we’re going to let that slide for the moment….

 

Office Lens – did I mention it was free?

 

The thing that I saw was down to Ian Stuart. I had been asking some questions about OneNote and Class Notebook, and obviously Ian is the Go-To-Guy for such queries. He came out to visit me at school (many thanks Ian!) and ran through a few things with me. One of them was the amazing set of ‘Learning Tools’ available as a plugin for OneNote, and given our iOS situation he showed me the free Office Lens app too, but gave the caveat that it was only available in an iPhone version – although this could be used on the iPad like many iPhone apps.

After I got home, I went to download Office Lens to my iPad and found out that the info Ian had given me was inaccurate. There was an iPad version of Office Lens available! Turns out that it had literally just been released that day. I must have been one of the very first people to download it
(and did I mention it was free?).

So what does it do?

Well, put simply, if you have a piece of text, you point Office Lens at it, take a photo of it and it will then read it to you and also covert it into an editable document. See the pics below for an idea of how it works.

 

First, frame your document in the camera, and capture an image using the onscreen red button.

A thumbnail will be displayed of the image you just captured. You can now take more pictures, if you have more pages to scan.

Choose where you want the image to be sent.

Let’s start with the Immersive Reader.

The conversion is reasonably quick, on a decent signal at least.

Immersive Reader provides a clean and pretty clutter free interface.

Press the play button, and the text will be read out to you. The speed of the reading can be varied to suit your individual needs.

          

The current word being spoken is highlighted as it is read, and you can make the speech faster or slower to suit.

Did I mention it was free? And we’re not finished yet…..

If you have a compatible OneDrive account – like I don’t know, a school account or through Glow – then you can upload the scanned document to Word through OneDrive….

…where it just happens to become fully editable text. As with any OCR technology, it’s not perfect – but it is pretty good.

As an easy to use app which is simple and user friendly, it’s mightily impressive. And did I mention it was free? Get it for iOS at http://tiny.cc/OfficeLens

It’s also available as an Android or Windows (naturally) app, but I haven’t seen them up and running. Definitely worth a look though.

So, that’s Lens. What about ‘through a lens’?

Well, an interesting thing happened when I was showing a colleague how Lens worked. This technology, which would have been jaw-dropping a couple of years ago say, is free to download and easy to use – and I’m listening to myself say “Yeah – it’s a shame you can’t change the colour of the background it’s reading from, or how the highlighting works. And I wish you could add a Scottish accent….”

And then I stopped and listened to myself. I smiled, and thought about what the app is capable of and what our reaction was to seeing. And it’s a telling glimpse of where we are. We are insatiable. It doesn’t matter how good a piece of software, or hardware or work is, we always want it to do more, be more, achieve more. Which is good, in a way, and where progress and improvement comes from. But sometimes you just need to stop for a minute and say good job, well done.

So Microsoft; good job, well done.

1 in 10 people have dyslexia in Scotland⤴

from @ Reach

What do Keira Knightley, Steven Spielberg and Jamie Oliver have in common? They all have dyslexia.

Having dyslexia means you may need help with reading, writing, spelling and sometimes speaking too. People with dyslexia are often very creative and good at thinking outside the box.

The post 1 in 10 people have dyslexia in Scotland appeared first on Reach.

New film about one girl’s story of being bullied for having problems reading⤴

from @ Enquire - young people's blog

Did you know that Albert Einstein the genius scientist was considered dyslexic?  Just one of the things I learnt from watching a wonderful new film called Judged, by I am me Scotland. The film is about one girl’s story of what it’s like to have dyslexia and get bullied at school for not being able to read out loud in class. “I was always scared I would get picked. You see, being dyslexic doesn’t mean I’m stupid. I’m actually really clever…it Continue reading

Calum Walker talks dyslexia⤴

from @ Enquire - young people's blog

Callum talks dyslexia thumbnailAs it’s Dyslexia Awareness Week this week, we thought we’d ask Calum Walker to share his experience of having dyslexia. Calum, who is 10 years old and attends Carron Primary School in Falkirk, has been helping other children with dyslexia by using Youtube to share some of his top tips for reading and writing. Click on Calum’s picture to hear some of his brilliant advice and watch Continue reading

Dyslexia Scotland – teachers welcome!⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

The theme of Dyslexia Awareness Week this year is ‘Making Sense of Dyslexia’, chosen to fit in with Education Scotland’s 2014 report ‘Making Sense: Education for Children and Young People in Scotland’. Lots of people think that we just work with children and adults with dyslexia and parents but that’s not so. Earlier this month, […]

Useful, quick tips for teaching dyslexic learners⤴

from

1. Praise Gives Power; Criticism Kills

A dyslexic person needs to have confidence to learn and overcome their difficulties. Because they have experienced failure, deep down they don’t believe they are capable of learning.

Re-establish self-confidence.
Provide the opportunity to succeed.
Give praise for small achievements.

Dyslexics need constant praise and support. You worked hard! You did well! WOW! That's really good!

2.  Don’t ask a dyslexic to read aloud

Words are likely to be misread or skipped, causing embarrassment.

3. Don’t punish a dyslexic for forgetting things like books or sports kit

Offer positive strategies such as having one place to put things away.

4. Don’t call a dyslexic lazy

Dyslexics have to work harder to produce a smaller amount.

Dyslexics have difficulty staying focused when reading, writing or listening.

5. Expect less written work

A dyslexic may be verbally bright but struggle to put ideas into writing.

Allow a dyslexic more time for reading, listening and understanding.

6. Prepare a printout of homework and stick it in their book

Provide numbered steps, e.g. 1. Do this. 2. Do that etc.

7. Do not expect a dyslexic to copy text from a board or book

Give a printout. Suggest they highlight key areas and draw thumbnail pictures in the margin to represent the most important points.

Do not expect a dyslexic to copy text from a board or book

8. Accept homework created on a computer

Physical handwriting is torture for most dyslexics. Word processors make life much easier. Allow them to use the Spell checker and help with grammar and punctuation so that you can see the quality of the content.

9. Discuss an activity to make sure it is understood

Visualising the activity or linking it to a funny action may help dyslexics remember.

10. Give the opportunity to answer questions orally

Dyslexics can often demonstrate their understanding with a spoken answer but are unable with to put those ideas in writing.

All credit to  the Nessy website for these useful tips.  You can find further information and support for Teachers, Parents/Carers and students on this site.

ICT and Literacy Seminar: 10th December⤴

from

CALL Scotland are running an ICT and Literacy Seminar on Wednesday 10th December, 9.30am-1pm.

This FREE event will explore how technology can be used to support learners with additional support needs in assessment of literacy skills. They will look at tools and techniques such as text-to-speech software for accessing reading texts, and for writing, such as spellcheckers, word prediction and speech recognition.

This will be a really worthwhile session to attend either in person or via webinar (details to sign up on the link above).  I can feedback to all afterwards as I will be going.