Tag Archives: Digital Learning

Scottish Learning Festival 2018: 11 exciting DYW related seminars on offer⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

As one of the key  priorities in education, Developing the Young Workforce related contributions will feature prominently again at the SLF 2018 (19 – 10 September, SCCC, Glasgow).  This year’s main focus  will be on School-Employer Partnerships and STEM related learning around DYW.

Here is a list of key seminars:

Wednesday, 19 September

Title Presenters/education establishment Room/ Time
School-employer and Local Authority partnerships: A partnership approach to delivering DYW Donald MacLeod, Western Isles Carron 1

9.30

School-employer partnerships:  Planning, sustaining and developing a whole school strategic partnership:  what works and why? Peter Smith, Wallace High School, Stirling Carron 1,

12.30

STEM/Numeracy: Linking the maths curriculum to the world of work Alessio Gusmeroli, Skills Development Scotland Dochart 1,

12.30

School-employer partnerships:  Collaborative multi-agency approach to DYW Gill Geddes, Peebles High School, Scottish Borders Carron 1, 14.00
Profiling in the context of DYW: New guidance and My World of Work toolkit Klaus Mayer, Education Scotland and Derek Hawthorne, SDS Carron 1,

15.15

Thursday, 20 September

Theme/Title Presenters Room/ Time
DYW Regional Group: Labour market information for teachers Abigail Kinsella, Glasgow City Council Carron 1,

10.45

DYW whole school approach/ partnerships: Developing Employability and Creativity Skills across

learning

Castlebrae Community High School, Edinburgh; St Albert’s Primary School, Glasgow Ness,

12.00

School-employer partnerships/STEM:   The impact of STEM insight teacher placements Helen Winton, SSERC Alsh 1

13.15

ICT: Stirling digital skills forum: building partnerships and developing skills for the future Helen Gorman, Stirling Council Carron 1,

13.15

ICT/Skills:   Embed computational thinking across the BGE curriculum Lorna Kerr, Education Scotland Katrine

14.30

Gender/partnerships: RISE: inspiring the future! Audrey McDermott, Uddingston Grammar School, South Lanarkshire  

Download our DYW Flyer with all related seminars here: SLF 18 DYW seminar flyer

Access the full SLF programme here:  https://education.gov.scot/Documents/SLF2018conferenceprogramme.pdf

Register for the SLF and book your seminars here.

 

 

Using digital portfolios to share learning experiences and skills progression⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Tarbolton Primary School in South Ayrshire use ‘Seesaw’, a student driven digital portfolios, for learners from to instantaneously share and record learning experiences and achievements from within and out with school.

Children and young people use mobile devices to  evidence their learning,  upload personal targets and reflect on their progress .  This is then continuously shared with their teachers and parents in order to review their learning.

Seesaw is also used for uploading homework, sharing letters or information as well as daily communications.

Lynsey Bradford, PT at Tarbolton Primary School says:

“Seesaw has radically changed how we log our pupils learning journeys. It is instant and accessible from all devices and ticks the digital platform buttons for all children.  They want to see and share their learning and achievements now and this app allows them to do that in a safe and secure way.”

Read more about how the school has implemented the tool across the school and how it plans to extend its use into early learning and childcare.: Interesting Practice in Skills DYW – Profiling_Seesaw tool

 

 

New and improved Glow Connect website⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

We are proud to share with you today the new and improved official Glow website Glow Connect

The site provides Glow customers with information on the educational benefits of Glow, easy access to the main Glow login screen, and help and guidance on the various services Glow offers. We hope you enjoy using the site and find it valuable for keeping up to date on all things Glow

Glow Blogs Summer Release 2018 Survey⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Attention all Glow Blog users! We are seeking feedback on what new functionality you would like to see added to Glow Blogs. A short survey has been created to collect your feedback and is available here – https://blogs.glowscotland.org.uk/glowblogs/glowbloghelp/suggestions/

The next release of Glow Blogs is scheduled for summer 2018. In order for all responses to be considered in time for the release, the deadline for survey responses is the 30th November. All responses received after this date will be collected for consideration for future releases of Glow Blogs.

We are looking to gather as much feedback from our Glow users as possible so please complete the form and let us hear your ideas. Why not share this survey with your friends and colleagues to make Glow Blogs even better!

Making Scotland a STEM Nation⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

STEM Education and Training Strategy for Scotland has now been published

A STEM (Sciences Technologies, Engineering and Mathematics) Education and Training Strategy was launched in the Scottish Parliament last week by Ms Shirley-Anne Somerville, Minister for Further Education, Higher Education and Science. The Strategy, together with a STEM Evidence Base Report, is now available to download from: http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/10/1386/downloads

A central focus on the strategy is to enable everyone to develop STEM skills for learning, for life and for work. It provides a new emphasis on career pathways within STEM sectors and to grow successful  partnerships between schools and employers through the Developing the Young Workforce Programme.  The strategy also includes a commitment to expand Foundation, Modern and Graduate Apprenticeship Programmes to enable many to pursue jobs and careers in STEM through these pathways. This strong focus on skills and careers will further enhance national efforts to Develop the Young Workforce (DYW) and embed employment and career management skills in the curriculum through the Career Education Standard.

A wide variety and resources including exemplars around DYW and STEM can be accessed on the National Improvement Hub here.

 

Equality & Inclusion: Good practice exemplars⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The following four good practice exemplars have been published on the National Improvement Hub to highlight initiatives that help learners requiring additional support to develop skills and find employment.

Exemplar 1: Enable Scotland’s ‘Stepping Up’ programme

This innovative employability programme offers comprehensive support for young people aged 14 to 19 who have learning disabilities which takes participants from an initial investigation of the world of work, through a process of discovery and planning for their future, to engagement with employers in real workplace settings. Find out more here.

Exemplar 2: ‘Thinking Digitally’ – a new resource

This credit rate module by Lead Scotland allows candidates to develop relevant digital skills and build confidence operating in online environments.  More on this here.

Exemplar 3:  ‘TOPs’ – training opportunities for young parents

This programme run by Rathbone Training, a UK-wide voluntary youth sector organisation which supports young people aged 16 to 24 who have disengaged from society, aims to help young parents in their personal development. More here.

Exemplar 4: ‘Community Action and Leadership Award

This is a course created by the charity Lead Scotland so that more people can learn how to influence change and make a difference within their communities. More information here.

mi:Space: Inspirational Learning Spaces⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Last September schools in Midlothian undertook an innovative and exciting new project which would allow them to transform the way that they learnt in their classrooms. Through consultations with local architects, extensive research and planning in their classrooms the schools created their own inspirational learning spaces!

Throught the year the classes had the opportunity to undertake various projects which would help develop and enhance by their new learning spaces. The first project was a STEM eco-classroom project. This is a project created by the Engineering Development Trust to help the pupils to develop their science, technology, engineering and maths skills. During this project, the pupils were challenged to build an eco-friendly classroom. They needed to research eco-friendly classrooms that have already been designed in schools and then use this research to create their classroom in a way that helps the environment.

In an exciting opportunity for the schools, teachers were invited to a training session with VEX Robotics. During the session the teachers got to use programmeable robots, making them move, make sounds and flash their lights! This wasn’t just for the teachers as they went back to school and used the robots with the pupils who could programme them straight from their iPads. In March pupils from two Midlothian primary schools – Loanhead and St David’s – travelled to the National Exhibition Centre in Birmingham to take part in the VEX Robotics UK Challenge. The VEX Challenge requires teams to program robots to carry out a series of complex tasks while competing against 40 other teams from all over the UK. Both schools won awards for high level of competancy in programming their robots!

The final project that the schools undertook was a CSI inspired activity where the pupils had to solve the Mayberry Mystery Crime. They visited the Mining Museum in Newtongrange which was the scene of a terrible crime and using their skills they had to solve the mystery and name the culprit. To help keep the pupils working together they used a Yammer group to keep their investiagtions up to date!

Throughout the year lots of exciting work went on in the newly designed classrooms and you can find out more on the mi:Space Blog – https://blogs.glowscotland.org.uk/mc/mispace/

E-Sgoil: A digital solution for Gaelic Medium Education Scottish Learning Festival: Wednesday 20 September⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

E-Sgoil offers schools a digital learning solution to increase the breadth of programmes and pathways on offer to young people as part of Curriculum for Excellence.  You are invited to a seminar at the Scottish Learning Festival at which Angus MacLennan, Headteacher of e-Sgoil will share an evaluation of some primary and secondary pilots that e-Sgoil ran in their first year.   Advice will also be available on how e-Sgoil can increase learning through the medium of Gaelic at the secondary stages. Information on how to register for this seminar, and the festival programme, are available here.

Edinburgh International Film Festival 2017⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The programme for EIFF Youth Hub 2017 is now live!

Now in its fourth year, EIFF Youth Hub returns for four days packed with free practical filmmaking workshops, masterclasses and events for 15-25 year-olds. Whether you want to gain insights into animation or screenwriting, learn from experienced filmmakers about acting, cinematography or short filmmaking, or if you just want to network and step into a career in film – Youth Hub has something for everyone from 23 to 26 of June.

Events at Youth Hub are free with a Youth Hub Pass which costs £5 and gives access to all Youth Hub events as well as £5 discounted tickets to most EIFF films.

Highlights from this year’s programme directly related to careers in the industry:

A Foot in the Door: First Steps in Film & TV Drama

Saturday, 24 June 2017 | 5pm – 7pm | Education Space | Limited to 30 spaces.

Outlining how being a great runner can be the key to a successful start to your career. 

BAFTA award winning Scottish producer Linda Fraser (Hit the Ground Running) will share an overview of the industry in Scotland, what a runner does and how to be awesome at it. Packed with practical insider info and tips for how to get started, this is a session not to be missed!

Spaces for this event are limited. To sign-up please email youthhub@edfilmfest.org.uk 

A Foot in the Door: Career Advice Session

Saturday, 24 June 2017 | 10.15am – 1.30pm |Main Hall | Limited to 50 spaces.

Want to get your foot in the door and break into the film/TV industry? Join us for our hugely popular careers advice session with Creative Skillset and training scheme Hit the Ground Running as we help you plan your next big step towards a career in the industry. This session includes:

10.15am – 11am: Panel discussion 11.10 am – 12.15pm: Networking surgery with filmmakers and experts from the creative industries. 12.15pm – 1.30pm: A light networking lunch with industry guests, EIFF filmmakers and delegates.

Spaces for this event are limited. To sign-up please email youthhub@edfilmfest.org.uk

Access the full programme here:  https://www.edfilmfest.org.uk/learning/youth-hub

 

 

Gaelic Medium Education – self-improvement, attainment and leadership⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

By Joan Esson, HM Inspector and Lead Officer for inspection of Gaelic Medium Education

The recently published report, ‘Quality and Improvement in Scottish Education 2012-2016’ (QuISE) highlighted a number of key areas of strengths and aspects for improvement from 3-18 Gaelic Medium Education (GME) inspections. You can read the chapter relating to GME on our website.

It was a great privilege to review our inspection findings for GME and evidence how the sector is developing. The approaches that are used in GME are a very effective example of language learning in Scotland.  Children learn the language to a high level of fluency which enables them to access learning through Gaelic, while achieving expected attainment levels in all areas of the curriculum.

Overall, inspectors found that most children and young people in GME were making good progress in developing their fluency. By the senior phase, attainment in Gàidhlig as a subject is strong.  Interest in the role of Gaelic (Learners) as an additional language, and the development of GME in some areas of Scotland, is growing.

In this blog, I would like to consider three areas that should be given initial consideration in using the QuISE report as part of the improvement journey for GME.

  1. Being a self-improving GME provision

Education Scotland aims to support practitioners as they build capacity for improvement. The QuISE report presents an important source for practitioners’ use in self-evaluation. The chapters for early learning and childcare, primary and secondary, should be used along with the one on GME. Education Scotland’s Advice on Gaelic Education gives a strategic guide to what constitutes high-quality national practice, some of which now forms statutory Guidance. Taken together with self-evaluation frameworks, practitioners have a rich resource to enable an in-depth focus on Gaelic. Senior leaders, along with other practitioners, should take time to use these resources for self-evaluation. In future inspections, we would like to evidence improved leadership of GME, with Gaelic being at the heart of strategic planning and part of continuous improvement.      

2. Closing the attainment gap

An important outcome of GME is that children attain equally well, or better, than their peers in English medium education. This gives parents confidence in GME for which we need to have a relentless focus on high-quality attainment and progress. In our forthcoming inspections, we would like to see practitioners, and indeed the children and young people themselves, being clearer on their progress and how to improve further. To clarify expectations, teachers assisted us in designing Benchmarks for literacy and Gàidhlig. These need to be used in the joint planning of learning, teaching and assessment;  for monitoring and tracking of progress and in the moderation of standards.

At all times, practitioners have an important role in interacting skilfully with children, while modelling good immersion techniques to help children acquire the language. Practitioners’ skill in doing this impacts on children’s fluency. Playroom experiences are threaded together and given direction with a curriculum framework that promotes continuity and progression.

Education Scotland’s Advice on Gaelic Education (particularly chapter 7), coupled with Building the Ambition, (particularly chapters 6 and 7), present practitioners with effective pedagogy for early learning in GME. Building the Curriculum 2 details children’s natural disposition “to wonder, to be curious, to pose questions, to experiment, to suggest, to invent and to explain”. In the immersion playroom, practitioners will engage in short periods of activities that they will lead as part of children’s intended learning. At other times, children will be choosing what they play which they may initiate as they follow their interests, or be an experience planned by practitioners.

If we are to close the attainment gap in GME, we need to recognise the early gains from a strong total immersion experience as part of early learning and childcare. For this, children need to hear and absorb very fluent Gaelic across a range of play contexts.   Practitioners’ quality and frequent interactions are key drivers in helping children to acquire fluency as they foster learning which is creative, investigative and exploratory.

3. Improving the leadership of the GME curriculum

The QuISE  report highlighted that our strong primary GME provisions are clear on the correlation between immersion, fluency and impact on attainment.   At the secondary stages, there is still more to do to ensure young people have enough opportunities to learn through Gaelic. We recognise in the QuISE  report that there are challenges from shortages of Gaelic-speaking practitioners.  However, we ask for more of a solution-focused approach.  Our Advice on Gaelic Education  (particularly chapters 9-13) gives strategic direction to the development of the GME secondary curriculum.

In our forthcoming inspections, we would like to see much more prominence given to those learning in GME as a group for whom pathways need to be developed. It would be useful to continue to develop a shared understanding of how Curriculum for Excellence, with its emphasis on the totality of learning, may be maximised for GME. Speakers of Gaelic are a key driver in planning the curriculum. Could more of our Gaelic-speaking practitioners in schools be delivering some aspect of the curriculum in Gaelic?  Could they, for example, be encouraged to deliver a subject, club, universal support or an opportunity for achievement through Gaelic?  The African proverb, “It takes a village to raise a child” chimes with the need to increase the role of partners in the GME curriculum.  A good starting point would be for curriculum planners to know who their Gaelic-speaking partners are, and begin to ascertain how they can assist with planning and delivery of learning.

Finally, I would like to invite you to a seminar at the Scottish Learning Festival which focuses on how technology can increase learning through the medium of Gaelic. e-Sgoil presents a digital solution to delivering the curriculum. The headteacher of e-Sgoil will share an evaluation of some pilots that ran this year. Information on how to register for this seminar, and the festival programme, are available here.