Tag Archives: CPD

Google Education Roadshow @kingussiehigh #NDLW17 #digitaldifference⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

Kingussie Event - OB Keynote

Well it is the end of National Digital Learning Week in Scotland (#NDLW17).

I started the week by hosting and keynoting the Scottish leg of the Google in Education UK Roadshow at Kingussie High School and finished the week by having my latest resource 'Leading a Digital Learning Strategy' published by the Scottish College for Educational Leadership (SCEL) as part of their Framework for Education Leadership. More about that here.

The Google Event had a real buzz about it on Monday and it was great to have an opportunity to work with the wider roadshow team, who are currently touring the UK as part of the Google in Education Fuel the Future Tour. A special shout out must go to Louise Jones, Oli Trussell, James Leonard and Dean Stokes for their excellent presentations - I certainly learnt a lot and realised that there are lots more features within G-Suite for Education that we could be exploiting at school.

It was also great to have 20 local authorities represented at the event and a good blend between practitioners, local authority advisors and policy makers. I am interested to see what G-Suite looks like within Glow when it becomes available as part of the productivity suite in August this year.

Kingussie Google Event - May 2017

The theme of this years National Digital Learning Week was making a #digitaldifference and for a little school in the middle of the Cairngorm National Park I think we certainly punch well above our weight in terms of making a #digitaldifference. The map below is a nice illustration of just some of our influence in the last week.18527383_10158619884970702_49681753105711023_o

 

Google Education Roadshow @kingussiehigh #NDLW17 #digitaldifference⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

Kingussie Event - OB Keynote

Well it is the end of National Digital Learning Week in Scotland (#NDLW17).

I started the week by hosting and keynoting the Scottish leg of the Google in Education UK Roadshow at Kingussie High School and finished the week by having my latest resource 'Leading a Digital Learning Strategy' published by the Scottish College for Educational Leadership (SCEL) as part of their Framework for Education Leadership. More about that here.

The Google Event had a real buzz about it on Monday and it was great to have an opportunity to work with the wider roadshow team, who are currently touring the UK as part of the Google in Education Fuel the Future Tour. A special shout out must go to Louise Jones, Oli Trussell, James Leonard and Dean Stokes for their excellent presentations - I certainly learnt a lot and realised that there are lots more features within G-Suite for Education that we could be exploiting at school.

It was also great to have 20 local authorities represented at the event and a good blend between practitioners, local authority advisors and policy makers. I am interested to see what G-Suite looks like within Glow when it becomes available as part of the productivity suite in August this year.

Kingussie Google Event - May 2017

The theme of this years National Digital Learning Week was making a #digitaldifference and for a little school in the middle of the Cairngorm National Park I think we certainly punch well above our weight in terms of making a #digitaldifference. The map below is a nice illustration of just some of our influence in the last week.18527383_10158619884970702_49681753105711023_o

 

‘Leading a Digital Learning Strategy’ – [A @teamscel Framework for Education Leadership Resource] #NDLW17⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

SCEL Framework

In recent months I have started to get more involved with The Scottish College of Educational Leadership including being accepted on their Fellowship Programme (which I have been very much enjoying and will get around to writing about eventually!). 

SCEL supports teachers' and early years' practitioners professional learning in leadership. It was established in April 2014 following recommendations in Teaching Scotland’s Future (or the Donaldson Report) and is an organisation committed to ensuring the best possible leadership at all levels across Scotland's schools.

As part of its many activities they have developed a Framework for Education Leadership. The Framework for Education Leadership is an on-line learning resource that supports professional learning in leadership for teachers at all stages of their career. The framework is centred on a research based model which consists of four key processes to support the professional growth of teachers: reflection on practice, experimental learning, social learning processes and cognitive development. 

There are six aspects of educational leadership which underpin all learning activities within the framework. These are leading change, collaboration, self-evaluation, learning and self and others. The framework links to the professional standards of the GTCS and the SSSC.

As part of my wider work, Jay Helbert and I have worked to develop a Framework Activity titled 'Leading a Digital Learning Strategy'.

Within the learning activity practitioners have the opportunity to:

  • reflect upon national educational priorities and the school’s current position in relation to digital learning and technology
  • develop your own skills and understanding of digital learning and what this means for employability and the future
  • consider the different ways that you can learn from others and develop others in all aspects of digital learning
  • evaluate the impact of digital learning within the context of school transformation

The learning activity is split into eight simple steps, which are:

  • Refresh your knowledge on the current national priorities related to digital learning in Scottish schools
  • Identifying learning purpose
  • Evaluating choices & deciding upon resource
  • Develop an implementation plan which includes evaluation of impact on learning
  • Developing leadership of staff through digital learning
  • Developing leadership of self and colleagues
  • Evaluating impact on learning & decide next steps
  • Consider the impact of this activity upon your professional practice

We launched the new resource as part of Scotland's National Digital Learning Week in Scotland (#NDLW17) on Friday and hopefully the Scottish Education Community will find it useful?

More details about the Framework and the many other learning activities within it here: https://www.scelframework.com 

‘Leading a Digital Learning Strategy’ – [A @teamscel Framework for Education Leadership Resource] #NDLW17⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

SCEL Framework

In recent months I have started to get more involved with The Scottish College of Educational Leadership including being accepted on their Fellowship Programme (which I have been very much enjoying and will get around to writing about eventually!). 

SCEL supports teachers' and early years' practitioners professional learning in leadership. It was established in April 2014 following recommendations in Teaching Scotland’s Future (or the Donaldson Report) and is an organisation committed to ensuring the best possible leadership at all levels across Scotland's schools.

As part of its many activities they have developed a Framework for Education Leadership. The Framework for Education Leadership is an on-line learning resource that supports professional learning in leadership for teachers at all stages of their career. The framework is centred on a research based model which consists of four key processes to support the professional growth of teachers: reflection on practice, experimental learning, social learning processes and cognitive development. 

There are six aspects of educational leadership which underpin all learning activities within the framework. These are leading change, collaboration, self-evaluation, learning and self and others. The framework links to the professional standards of the GTCS and the SSSC.

As part of my wider work, Jay Helbert and I have worked to develop a Framework Activity titled 'Leading a Digital Learning Strategy'.

Within the learning activity practitioners have the opportunity to:

  • reflect upon national educational priorities and the school’s current position in relation to digital learning and technology
  • develop your own skills and understanding of digital learning and what this means for employability and the future
  • consider the different ways that you can learn from others and develop others in all aspects of digital learning
  • evaluate the impact of digital learning within the context of school transformation

The learning activity is split into eight simple steps, which are:

  • Refresh your knowledge on the current national priorities related to digital learning in Scottish schools
  • Identifying learning purpose
  • Evaluating choices & deciding upon resource
  • Develop an implementation plan which includes evaluation of impact on learning
  • Developing leadership of staff through digital learning
  • Developing leadership of self and colleagues
  • Evaluating impact on learning & decide next steps
  • Consider the impact of this activity upon your professional practice

We launched the new resource as part of Scotland's National Digital Learning Week in Scotland (#NDLW17) on Friday and hopefully the Scottish Education Community will find it useful?

More details about the Framework and the many other learning activities within it here: https://www.scelframework.com 

Apple Teacher widens its reach⤴

from @ The H-Blog

Last year, when the iPhone 7 was launched I think, I had been reading about the new Apple Teacher program and got quite excited about signing up – only to find out that I couldn’t because it was for the United States only. It did give a page to keep checking back on that they promised to update as the program became available in other countries or regions – and I had even been remembering to check! The last time I checked it was after we came back from the Christmas holidays, and I was still faced with the single line of availability: United States

Anyway, last Thursday, I got an email notifying me that the Apple Distinguished Educator (ADE) programme was open to applications again. Remembering the heft of the application last time, I thought I would have a quick glance to see what was involved this time. Imagine my surprise to find that being an exisiting Apple Teacher was a prerequisite to applying to be an ADE !

 

When I dug deeper into things, I found that the list of countries had been updated (on January 24th, just in time for BETT?) and now included Australia, Denmark, Hong Kong, Ireland, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Singapore, Sweden and the United Kingdom as well as the United States.

So obviously I had to go and have a look.

An early stumbling block you might face is to do with your Apple ID. The Apple Teacher site states pretty specifically that it’s your own personal Apple ID you’ve to sign up with, and not an ID provided by your establishment. That’s fine for people like me – who surf the wave of our copious IDs with ease – but for some other teachers it may prove a bit more challenging.

Once you are through the sign-up hoop, you will find yourself logged into the Apple Teacher Learning Centre. Pick your device of choice – esentially iOS or Mac – and there are a set of tutorials and quizzes for you to complete to become an Apple Teacher. I can’t speak for Mac, but the iOS ones were:

  • iPad
  • Pages for iPad
  • Keynote for iPad
  • Numbers for iPad
  • iMovie for iPad
  • Garageband for iPad
  • Productivity with iPad
  • Creativity with iPad

Having completed the quizzes for iOS, I can confirm that they are not pitched at “Expert” level, the main plank of evidence being that I managed to pass them all. I got a very nice, shiny email for my trouble:

 

Interestingly, passing quizzes opens up more quizzes and the interface itself is pretty user friendly – as you’d expect from Apple. I’m looking forward to seeing how the site and the program develop, that’s for sure.

If you’re interested, you can sign yourself up for Apple Teacher at:

http://www.apple.com/uk/education/apple-teacher/

Career Education Standard (3-18): Exemplification Tool offers a ‘helping hand’⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

ces-exemplification-toolA new tool is now available for practitioners to support planning and developing new practice in career education or to reflect on existing practice.   Based on the ‘I can’ statements in the Career Education Standard (3-18) it provides illustrations of what children and young people might experience in order to help them meet their entitlements.  For ease of reference the entitlements have been appended to the resource and linked to each theme.  The tool  supports  practitioners  to consider what  career education might look like in their own particular contexts and to plan accordingly.

Structure

The exemplification tool groups the entitlements and the illustrative  ‘I can statements’ in five themes and by levels.  Alongside these are suggestions of the types of activities that children and young people might experience as they work towards their entitlements.

The themes are :

  1. Exploring the concept of work (from simulated experiences to the world of work)
  2. Expanding horizons and ambitions
  3. Diversity and equity
  4. Seeking help and information
  5. Finding a route to work

Down load the exemplification tool here:  ces-exemplification-tool

Illustrations of how education establishments have implemented DYW across the curriculum can be found on the Education Scotland ‘Learning Blog’.

Scotland’s Enterprising Schools – National Leadership Event⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Scot Enterprising SchoolsScotland’s Enterprising Schools, with the support of Education Scotland, will host a national event for strategic leaders in education to inspire enterprising attitudes, entrepreneurship and the development of skills for learning, life and work in learners.

This all-day event will be held on :

26th October 2016 at Princes Trust Wolfson Centre, Cumbrae House, 15 Carlton Court, Glasgow G5 9JP.

Delegates will have the opportunity to hear from keynote speakers from Scottish Government and Education Scotland as well as meeting business organisations who can help schools embed an enterprising culture. There will also be interactive workshops.  Access the SES Conference 2610 draft agenda here.

More information will follow shortly.

 

Perimeter Institute – EinsteinPlus 2016 – Day 2⤴

from @ stuckwithphysics.co.uk

Day 2 of EinsteinPlus 2016 saw the group formally welcomed to the spectacular Perimeter Institute building after an equally spectacular breakfast. (There are two excellent bistros at PI, which provided the group with a fabulous range of meals over the week long visit. I'd say more, but there'd be a real danger of this becoming a food blog...)

The morning session was split into two -

  • Cosmology - this used an existing PI activity 'The Signature of the Stars' from their educational resource on 'The Expanding Universe' - using diffraction glasses observations were made of line spectra from a variety of gas discharge lamps. These spectra are used to identify the elements present in stars, in the Milky way and in distant galaxies. The spectra of light from distant galaxies shows the same spectral lines as stars in our galaxy, but the lines appear in slightly different positions, with longer wavelengths. This effect, known as Red Shift, occurs because the galaxies are moving away from us, and each other, at high speeds. Measuring the red shift for a galaxy can be used to measure its speed, which relates in turn to its distance from us. This effect was first observed in the early 20th century and used to formulate Hubble's Law - which states that not only is the universe expanding, but the further away from us a galaxy is, the faster it is moving. The activity includes data allowing the red shift of a range of galaxies at different known distances to be used to find their speeds. This data is then plotted it give a graph representing Hubble's Law, which gives an approximation of the Hubble constant and can in turn be used to find the age of the universe.

  • Gravitational waves - this used a newly developed activity based around the recent detection of Gravitational Waves at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) facilities in the USA. The facilities use extremely large scale (~4km) laser interferometers to measure incredibly small expansions or contractions (~10-19 m - 1000 times smaller than the diameter of a proton) of the devices which occur when gravitational waves pass. There are many areas of physics and engineering involved in the development and operation of the LIGO detectors, from the solutions to Einstein's General Relativity which predicted the existence of Gravitational waves, to the intricate suspension of the mirrors sued to improve the sensitivity of the detectors - developed at the University of Glasgow. The activity centres around the properties of waves, and their behaviour when they undergo reflection - beginning with demonstrations of mechanical waves using a slinky. Observations of phase change upon reflection were developed upon and related to the operation of the interferometers at LIGO. These ideas were utilised in a hands on activity to simulate the paths of the laser light used at LIGO in order to find the nature of the light detected when the device is unstretched (no gravitational wave) and stretched. This task offers an excellent opportunity to link this part of the Advanced Higher physics unit on waves to a context which involves real, cutting edge physics.

LIGO unstretched

LIGO stretchedAfter lunch, followed a two more sessions -

  • Neutrino Detection - another new activity, this is based on the Nobel Prize winning work of Professor Art McDonald and his team at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNOLAB). The session began with an overview of the production of neutrinos in the sun and the difficulty in detecting these particles - the 'Solar Neutrino Problem'. The session continued with a description of the facility at SNOLAB and a hands on task modelling the detector using marbles, cardboard boxes and a baking tray. There was a great deal of discussion about this task, and the nature of the model to describe and explain neutrino detection. Consequently there was a shortage of time for the remaining tasks, dealing with real data from SNOLAB and the theory of 'neutrino oscillation'.

  • Dark Matter - this session used the 'Dark Matter Within a Galaxy' activity from 'The Mystery of Dark Matter' materials. The activity begins with a revision of the basic rules for circular motion and gravitation, using a range of data to find and plot the orbital speed of a star against its radius from the centre of its galaxy. These values, calculated from classical theory, do not compare well with observational data - implying that there must be more mass in these systems that we can not detect - Dark Matter. Whilst the part of the underlying physics of this task, circular motion, is beyond the scope of the Higher physics course in Scotland, it might be fair to use this as a practice data handling task which could be used to exemplify and reinforce the very brief mention of Dark Matter in the 'Our Dynamic Universe' unit.

The final session of the day was a keynote presentation delivered by Professor Avery Broderick from the University of Waterloo on the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT). This program uses nine existing telescopes across the globe and applies a technique known as Very Long Baseline Interferometery (VBLI) to improve the resolution at which images of very small objects can be made.

It is hoped that by improving the resolution for existing telescopes and including planned future telescopes in the gathering and processing of data, the EHT will obtain the first direct images of the event horizon for a black hole in our galaxy. Recent observations in the constellation of Sagittarius are thought to indicate the presence of a black hole with a mass around 4 millions time that of our sun. This black hole is of the right size and at the right distance for the EHT to be able to make observations that will allow an image to be obtained in the next few years.

The data gathered and images obtained by the EHT will allow for further testing of Einstein's theory of General Relativity, and provide a greater understanding of phenomena such as black hole accretion and plasma jets.

After this presentation and another excellent meal the group was offered a tour of the Perimeter Institute building, offering an insight into how the facilities have been designed and developed in order to attract and facilitate the work of some of the world's foremost theoretical physics (not to mention a very large number of teachers and students).

A selection of images of the building will be included in a gallery as soon as I figure out how to make it work...

 

Perimeter Institute – EinsteinPlus 2016 – Day 1⤴

from @ stuckwithphysics.co.uk

Earlier in the year I was delighted to receive an invitation to the annual Einstein Plus teachers' summer school at the Perimeter Institute in Waterloo, Ontario.

A total of forty two teachers from across Canada, USA, Europe and Asia attended the event, comprising workshops, lectures and visits from the 6th to the 12th of July.

Having registered and settled into our accommodation for the week, the first evening was given over to a delicious meal followed by a session of group 'ice breaker' tasks at the Hawk's Nest, Wilfrid Laurier University - one of two universities in the city of Waterloo.

One of the tasks was on the 'Process of Science' and involved the use of some small wooden cubes. Each of five of the faces carried a name and two numbers as shown in the images below.

Cube 1 Cube 2

Groups were asked to make observations, try to identify relationships and then predict what could appear on the blank face of the cube. Each group was able to complete all of these steps, but interestingly no two groups came up with exactly the same solution. All of the suggestions given were equally valid, given the evidence on which they had been based. This task made an excellent introduction to the idea of scientific modelling, a theme which would be returned to throughout the week.

Personalised Learning for Teachers about Digital Technologies for Learning⤴

from @ ICT for Teaching & Learning in Falkirk Primary Schools

MicrosoftTeacherTrainingBadgesMicrosoft in Education is a site which provides free on-demand personalised learning for teachers in exploring the use of digital technologies to support learning and teaching – learning at a pace which suits each teacher on the topics they find most useful to them, at the time they need it.

The online hub provides a Training and Professional Development section which is divided into Quick Tip Videos,  Courses (which can be filtered by age range of learners, tools, skills to be developed, etc), and Learning Paths which provide a more in-depth look at use of digital technologies compbing different methods of delivering the information and sharing of skills as well as exemplars.

There is a wide range of free instant-access online courses. Some of these are short tool-specific how-to guides to learning the basics of getting started using specific digital technologies such as Sway, Skype, OneNote, Powerpoint, Minecraft, Office Mix or many other tools. Some are just short quick-tip videos highlighting a specific feature of a particular piece of software.

Some courses are longer and look at how digital technologies can best be used to support learning and teaching in different contexts. These combine text guides, video explanations and examples, as well as quizzes to help understanding.

MicrosoftEducatorCommunityAnd by signing up to the free Microsoft in Education Community a teacher can access a wider range of resources shared by other teachers around the globe, and when working through the range of courses on offer a teacher can gain visual recognition through digital badges of their accomplishments. Working through the online resources, with badges to record progress, can provide an extra degree of motivation when there is a tangible record of what skills have been acquired, and perhaps a spur to just complete another one (and another, and another!!).

So whether starting out, or just looking for an illustration of a particular application in a classroom setting, reading about how others are using digital technologies to support learning, an online space to discuss with colleagues worldwide what’s worked (or look for advice when you might be looking for a solution to something which has not worked in your situation), or wanting to further explore how to integrate digital technology to best support learners in your school, there is something here for every teacher.

Sign up for free now at the Microsoft Educator Community at the link below:

https://education.microsoft.com/