Tag Archives: Community Development

Wee Blether reflections: The Power of Communities in Education Recovery⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

John Galt, Education Officer CLD, reflects on a recent wee blether hosted by Education Scotland and the CLD Standards Council

The Power of Communities in Education Recovery: Wednesday 5th August

One of our recent ‘Wee Blethers’ focused on what we’re learning about our communities across Scotland during the Covid-19 crisis and what messages that gives us for education recovery. The session was co-facilitated by the CLD Standards Council for Scotland and attracted an interesting mix of practitioners from education establishments, local authorities, community learning and development, third sector organisations and the Scottish Government.

The picture is a complex one. We heard that there is clear evidence that existing inequalities in communities across Scotland are being exacerbated by the Covid-19 crisis. We also heard though about the many examples of positive community-led responses to the crisis, often based on a strong understanding of what is needed locally, and organised around the knowledge and skills in the community to meet those needs.

We discussed the ‘power of communities’ and what a ‘resilient community’ looks like; how engaging with local communities can help to shape the curriculum – e.g. through approaches like Participatory Budgeting or by strengthening youth work and school partnerships; and the key role that community learning and development can play in supporting community-led activities and education recovery. Check out this link for more details https://share.wakelet.com/doc/2AvJL8-Gczc88TAJFyBEK

 

Online Learning opportunities⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Education Scotland CLD officers have collated a range of websites and specific online courses that may be relevant to those working in the Community Learning and Development sector. We hope you find these useful – please get in touch with Susan.Epsworth@educationscotland.gov.scot if you know of an opportunity worth sharing

Learn 100% online with world-class universities and industry experts – Browse Future Learn’s free online courses in subjects ranging from Psychology and Mental Health to Creative Arts and Media https://www.futurelearn.com/courses

Black Lives Matter – Explore resources from petitions to books and courses – to help you get involved in the Black Lives Matter movement, and educated about the history of black oppression https://www.futurelearn.com/info/blog/black-lives-matter-resources

Abertay University has four free credit-bearing courses to help individuals develop their digital marketing abilities, and support businesses. They are delivered online and include live teaching sessions. https://www.abertay.ac.uk/courses/digital-marketing-micro-courses

Professional Development Resources for College Staff  on CDN LearnOnline https://professionallearning.collegedevelopmentnetwork.ac.uk/

Free online learning in a range of subjects from the Open University    https://www.open.edu/openlearn/free-courses

Find training, tutorials, templates, quick starts, and cheat sheets for Microsoft 365, including Excel, Outlook, Word, SharePoint, Teams, OneDrive, OneNote and more https://support.microsoft.com/en-gb/training

The Microsoft Certified Educator Program is a professional development program that bridges the gap between technology skills and innovative teaching, learn more: https://education.microsoft.com/en-us

Trend Micro https://internetsafety.trendmicro.com/webinars

Digi Learn Scot – a range of pre-recorded webinars to learn online at a time that suits you https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzFsp7PF70TMlqVM4nCsxSg?view_as=subscriber

 

Big CLD Blether⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

John Galt, CLD Education Officer reflects on the Big CLD Blether

I’ve been absolutely blown away by the amazing response of the community learning and development (CLD) sector to the Covid-19 crisis. While the lockdown obviously led to the abrupt suspension of most face to face CLD activities, from the start we’ve been hearing examples of how community workers, youth workers, adult educators and family learning workers in both the public and third sectors have continued to support learners and communities with dedication, creativity and kindness. Across Scotland, CLD practitioners have been supporting community initiatives to deliver food, medicine or provide vital social contact to vulnerable families and isolated people; engaging with young people through imaginative digital youth work; adapting learning activities to be accessible online, by phone or through resources to use at home; and helping to extend the reach of school and community hubs for children of key workers and vulnerable families. Many CLD providers are now playing a key role in helping to develop local and national recovery plans.

So I was delighted to help to facilitate The Big CLD Blether  – a virtual discussion with over 90 CLD practitioners and managers across Scotland which was jointly hosted by Education Scotland and The CLD Standards Council for Scotland on 28th May. The session was one of a series held throughout May to support practitioners from across the education system. (#ESBigBlether)

One of the challenges in our diverse sector is finding common digital platforms to use. We went for Google Meet for The Big CLD Blether which seemed to work well for most people.

The discussions were based around four themes and participants chose which ones to take part in. We were lucky to have 3 or 4 experienced practitioners in each themed discussion who shared their experiences and addressed questions from other participants. There were a lot of issues raised in each of the four discussions. Notes from the session will be available on iDevelop but here are some of the points raised:

Theme one: Operational challenges for CLD providers

Participants recognised the good work being done to support the changing needs of learners and communities. CLD organisations are also dealing with significant challenges though. Many 3rd sector organisations are facing extreme financial pressures and some staff had been furloughed. In some areas, local authority CLD staff had been redeployed. Many have been realigning what they do to engage learners and communities remotely while trying to address the clear digital inequalities that exist in our communities. The move to digital is a steep learning curve for many and so effective professional learning for staff is key. There is a strong recognition of the need to support the health and wellbeing of learners and staff.

Theme two: Engagement and learning – what’s working well?

Examples of what is working well were threaded through each of the discussion groups.  We heard about the wide range of digital platforms being used by CLD providers to engage young people, adult learners and community groups. We heard lots of examples of practitioners being flexible and endeavouring to start where learners are at online and we were reminded of the Digitally Agile CLD principles and the great resources out there, such as those on digital youth work from YouthLink. There were frustrations at the limitations that some organisations placed on using some platforms, although there was a recognition of the increased importance of digital safety. We heard that Youth Awards like Hi-5 and Saltire are being widely used to recognise young people’s volunteering during the crisis and that as lockdown eases, there is an increasing focus on supporting young people through street work.

 Theme 3: Supporting the health and wellbeing of CLD participants and staff

CLD practitioners can help participants to address the impacts of staying at home and feelings of grief, worry, stress or loneliness. We heard some of the feedback from the Lockdown Lowdown study which led to discussions on how can we best support the mental wellbeing of young people now and as lockdown continues to ease. Meanwhile feedback from the CLD Standards Council practitioner survey highlighted that many workers were dealing with stress themselves. Effective CPD and peer support are increasingly important priorities for practitioners.

Theme 4: Looking forward – the role of CLD in the recovery phase.

CLD practitioners have important roles to play – in education recovery plans and in wider community renewal. There are many opportunities for CLD to contribute including outdoor learning, blended learning with schools, supporting parents and families, youth awards etc. broad range of services, showcase ourselves. CLD workers will also have key roles to support community groups and organisations to rebuild and help to rebuild partnership working and collaboration to ensure that resources are deployed to best effect. Much of the focus for recovery planning will be at the local level and it is important that CLD partners are involved. There will also be an increasing need for CLD to support wider regional and national collaboration to support ‘building back better’ efforts. Participants were keen to maintain some of the new processes that have been put in place during lockdown.

Feedback about The Big CLD Blether was positive. Participants told us that they enjoyed re-connecting with CLD colleagues and discussing experiences and  pieces of work going well.

Both Education Scotland and the CLD Standards Council are keen to keep the discussions going with further CLD ‘blethers’ so please watch this space!

 

 

Regional CLD Engagement Events⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

We’re working with the Scottish Government, local CLD partners and CLD Standards Council to host 10 Regional Engagement Events on Adult Learning and CLD policy. The morning sessions will focus on consultation on the development of the new Adult Learning Strategy and the afternoon will allow an opportunity for partners to explore the local and national context for CLD. See sign up details for each region below:

Forth Valley and West Lothian (Livingston 5th March)

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/adult-learning-collaborating-for-improvement-regional-events-livingston-tickets-91349461699

Northern Alliance (Elgin 24th February)

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/adult-learning-collaborating-for-improvement-regional-events-elgin-tickets-91278708073

Northern Alliance (Aberdeen 16th March)

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/adult-learning-collaborating-for-improvement-regional-events-aberdeen-tickets-91350498801

South East (Edinburgh 27th February)

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/adult-learning-collaborating-for-improvement-regional-events-edinburgh-tickets-91351882941

South East (Galashiels 24th March)

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/adult-learning-collaborating-for-improvement-regional-events-galashiels-tickets-91352472705

South West (Dumfries 17th March)

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/adult-learning-collaborating-for-improvement-regional-events-dumfries-tickets-91356221919

South West (Ayr 27th March)

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/adult-learning-collaborating-for-improvement-regional-events-ayr-tickets-91357575969

Tayside (Dundee 11th March)

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/adult-learning-collaborating-for-improvement-regional-events-dundee-tickets-91380358111

West (Glasgow 25th February)

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/adult-learning-collaborating-for-improvement-regional-events-glasgow-tickets-91381956893

West (Coatbridge 18th March)

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/adult-learning-collaborating-for-improvement-regional-events-coatbridge-tickets-91383948851

Regional Working and the CLD Team⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Education Scotland has now moved to a regional delivery model and will support improvement and capacity building at local, regional and national level. CLD members are now part of Regional Teams. Each Regional team is headed up by a Senior Regional Advisor. There are six teams based on the geographies of the six Regional Collaboratives. The work of ES staff is not just limited to the RICs. All Regional teams except the Northern Team have a CLD presence. Team members will be in touch to make contact and find out about local developments.

Tayside Regional Improvement Team (Dundee, Perth and Kinross and Angus) Senior Regional Advisor (acting) –

CLD presence – Susan Epsworth, Development Officer, CLD Susan.Epsworth@educationscotland.gov.scot

South East Regional Improvement Team (Edinburgh City, Fife, Midlothian, East Lothian, Scottish Borders) Senior Regional Advisor – Alistair Brown

CLD presence – Chris Woodness, Education Officer, CLD (secondment) Vince Moore, Development Officer, CLD Vincent.Moore@educationscotland.gov.scot

South West Regional Improvement Team (Dumfries and Galloway, East Ayshire, South Ayrshire and North Ayshire) Senior Regional Advisor – Carol Copstick

CLD presence – Nicola Sykes, Senior Education Officer

Dehra Macdonald, Development Officer, CLD Dehra.Macdonald@educationscotland.gov.scot

Forth Valley and West Lothian Regional Improvement Team (Falkirk, Stirling, Clackmannanshire and West Lothian) Senior Regional Advisor – Jackie Halawi

CLD presence – Lindsay MacDonald, Education Officer, CLD Lindsay.MacDonald@educationscotland.gov.scot

Mandy Watts, Development Officer, CLD Mandy.Watts@educationscotland.gov.scot

West Regional Improvement Team (Glasgow City, East Dunbartonshire, East Renfrewshire, Inverclyde, North Lanarkshire, Renfrewshire, South Lanarkshire and West Dunbartonshire) Senior Regional Advisor – Patricia Watson

CLD presence – John Galt, Education Officer, CLD mailto:John.Galt@educationscotland.gov.scot

Laura Mcintosh, Development Officer, CLD Laura.Mcintosh@educationscotland.gov.scot

Northern Regional Improvement Team (Aberdeen City, Aberdeenshire, Moray, Argyll and Bute, Shetland Islands, Western Isles, Highland, Orkney) Senior Regional Advisor – David Gregory

National Gaelic Language Plan 2018-2023⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Bord na Gaidhlig has produced a new National Gaelic Language Plan. This sets out priorities for increasing the numbers speaking, learning and using the language.

The central aim of the Plan is to encourage and enable more people to use Gaelic more often and in a wider range of situations.  The key messages, aims, priorities and new commitments contained in the Plan all contribute to achieving this increased use of Gaelic.

John Swinney, Deputy First Minister and Cabinet Secretary for Education and Skills said “I am very pleased to launch this new National Gaelic Language Plan which reflects Gaelic’s unique and important contribution to many areas of Scottish life. It is vital that we have clear agreed priorities and continue to work together to increase the numbers speaking, learning and using the language. I would like to commend Bòrd na Gàidhlig for the work they have done in completing this Plan and I look forward to the opportunities for innovation, co-operation and progress prioritised in the plan over the next five years.”

Amongst the priority areas for the next five years are:

  • Initiatives targeting the use of Gaelic by young people
  • Increasing the contribution Gaelic makes to the Scottish economy across different sectors
  • Increasing the demand and provision for Gaelic Education
  • Developing Gaelic  medium workforce recruitment, retention, training and supply
  • Gaelic in the family
  • Gaelic Language Plans developed and implemented by public bodies; and
  • Promotion of the social, economic and cultural value of Gaelic

For more information, please see the National Gaelic Language Plan 2018-2023

Field of Enquiry 2000m2⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Whitmuir Farm invite you to join their field-of-enquiry-picField of Enquiry team to explore the food system through the 2000m2 lens. That is, when you divide all the arable land on our planet by the people, we each have 2000m2.

Over 10 Saturdays, topic by topic, they will examine the current state of affairs, make sense of the pressures on our sytem and as enquirer, we will frame questions we should ask scientists, farmers and politicians to answer if we are to do things differently.

The dates for the FREE sessions are as follows;

Saturday 8th October, 22nd October, 5th November, 19th November, 3rd December, 14th January, 28th January, 11th February, 25th February, 11th March

There is no obligation to attend all sessions.

Details of each of the sessions and how to sign up can be found here.

field-of-enquiry-2000m2

Supporting Men’s Sheds⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

scottish-mens-sheds-association-logo-WT-smallCan you help your local Men’s Shed?

In Argyll and Bute  when a school was  updating technical equipment they  gifted it to their local Men’s shed.  It’s a recycle/ re-use story.  Actions like this   promote inter-generational activities and lifelong learning.

A men’s shed is a meeting place where men come together and take part in a variety of mutually agreed activities. There are Men’s Sheds in 22 regions – there could be one near you.  More information from Age Scotland  or Scottish Men’s Sheds website

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Supporting Men’s Sheds⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

scottish-mens-sheds-association-logo-WT-smallCan you help your local Men’s Shed?

In Argyll and Bute  when a school was  updating technical equipment they  gifted it to their local Men’s shed.  It’s a recycle/ re-use story.  Actions like this   promote inter-generational activities and lifelong learning.

A men’s shed is a meeting place where men come together and take part in a variety of mutually agreed activities. There are Men’s Sheds in 22 regions – there could be one near you.  More information from Age Scotland  or Scottish Men’s Sheds website

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National Coding Week 19th September 2016⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

NCW-Banner-BlueText-Scottish

How to get involved with National Coding Week

Children are part of a confident “Digital Generation” having grown up with the internet, smart phones and coding classes. However, many adults have missed out on the digital revolution and feel left behind.

“The aim of National Coding Week is to give adults the opportunity to learn some digital skills”.

Children can inspire adults

Children are learning digital skills in school or through coding clubs such as CoderDojos. We therefore would like these clubs to open their doors to parents for a one-off session in which the children will teach the adults some of the skills they have learnt.

Libraries can act as focal points

Libraries are in an ideal position to act as a focal point and can host a coding session. Either the staff can lead the session or someone who is confident and familiar with coding from the local community can share their skills. Read CILIP’s blog: Libraries — how they can improve our Digital Literacy

Schools can get involved

Children are learning coding but many parents don’t understand what their children are doing and many non-specialist teachers and governors feel they have missed out on these skills.

Web, app, creative and digital businesses can throw open their doors

Those with the expertise can share their skills and have fun teaching people the basics of coding. There are many training organisations who offer courses throughout the year. They can contribute to the week by offering taster sessions to encourage people to sign-up.

Tech Hubs

There are hundreds of tech hubs with amazing businesses working from them. The tech hubs are giving start-ups a platform from which to launch businesses and inspire others. These can be the perfect venue for the week and we would love them to be involved.

Advice:

1) Keep it simple — it might simply by showing people resources available on the Technologies Professional Learning Community  in Glow, Code.org or Barefoot Computing

2) If you are able to organise it, get a friendly local web development agency, ICT teacher or FE college tutor to lead the session.

Click here to get involved!