Tag Archives: collaborative course design

To Blog ……. or not to Blog⤴

from @ eCurriculum Blog

You'd think having had a comment on my last posting in early March (thanks Joe), the third one ever, I should have approached my Blog with renewed enthusiasm. Someone out there is reading it! Yes you'd think so - however I seemed to have run out of steam there for a little while. I have, to be fair, been really busy particularly with the Collaborative Course Design Pilot we are running from the RSC right now and also working with colleagues designing another pilot project aimed at progressing the use of e-Assessment. But having said that I have allowed my Blog to slip down my list of priorities and I need to get back on track with it.

So I've coined a new phrase - Blog Fatigue! - well I thought I had however on closer inspection I discover that there is much written about this new phenomenon - so there you are Mrs Smug!

image from Flickr by michaelmarlatt licensed under creative commons

“Blog fatigue” is a common subject - and it's said that pretty much everyone comes down with it at one point or another. (see Jason Kaneshiro's blog about it). He suggests that it's routine that leads to it, something I was actually determined to keep to - hence the Friday Blog. No, no, no ..... he says "mix it up" to avoid BB (Blog Burnout.)

Another strategy suggested is to craft 52 one for each week and post date their publication - a bit too mercenary for me. I rather like to think that I provide an informative, responsive and up to date service - hmmmm.

I prefer Jason's solution so beware! I'm going to Blog as the inspiration takes me and it could be on any day of the week! In fact it's Wednesday today if I'm not mistaken.

Blog Fatigue: Is it fatal to your Blog ?

Suzanne senses Blog Fatigue - do you ?

To Blog ……. or not to Blog⤴

from @ eCurriculum Blog

You'd think having had a comment on my last posting in early March (thanks Joe), the third one ever, I should have approached my Blog with renewed enthusiasm. Someone out there is reading it! Yes you'd think so - however I seemed to have run out of steam there for a little while. I have, to be fair, been really busy particularly with the Collaborative Course Design Pilot we are running from the RSC right now and also working with colleagues designing another pilot project aimed at progressing the use of e-Assessment. But having said that I have allowed my Blog to slip down my list of priorities and I need to get back on track with it.

So I've coined a new phrase - Blog Fatigue! - well I thought I had however on closer inspection I discover that there is much written about this new phenomenon - so there you are Mrs Smug!

image from Flickr by michaelmarlatt licensed under creative commons

“Blog fatigue” is a common subject - and it's said that pretty much everyone comes down with it at one point or another. (see Jason Kaneshiro's blog about it). He suggests that it's routine that leads to it, something I was actually determined to keep to - hence the Friday Blog. No, no, no ..... he says "mix it up" to avoid BB (Blog Burnout.)

Another strategy suggested is to craft 52 one for each week and post date their publication - a bit too mercenary for me. I rather like to think that I provide an informative, responsive and up to date service - hmmmm.

I prefer Jason's solution so beware! I'm going to Blog as the inspiration takes me and it could be on any day of the week! In fact it's Wednesday today if I'm not mistaken.

Blog Fatigue: Is it fatal to your Blog ?

Suzanne senses Blog Fatigue - do you ?

Which comes first the Chicken or the Egg ?⤴

from @ eCurriculum Blog

Image by maymun from flickr licenced under Creative Commons This week saw the start of our new initiative aimed at supporting curriculum development in our region - we're calling it Collaborative Course Design (CCD) and beginning pilots in 3 of our supported institutions. My colleague and I spent 2 days this week working with a course team exploring technologies and how each can add value to the learning experiences both for the learners but also for the staff. It kind of brought home to me the chicken/egg nature of making decisions about how to exploit new technologies in general. In other words how do you know which technology to use unless you are exposed to them in an appropriate context.

Although I had a few concerns, the original plan for our sessions to explore and establish a common understanding of new technology was a good one. While individuals have ideas about the role of technology in the context of learning & teaching, ideas are constrained, quite naturally, by an individual's own experience and exposure to technology and software. I did wonder if spending time showing and explaining the scope and range of new learning technologies might be perceived as a waste of precious preparation time. However it became evident that a brief and concise demonstration provided enough of an insight for staff to quickly realise the potential of and application of new technologies for learning & teaching. The experience also supports our new 20 minute topic briefings aimed at senior & operational managers which we are offering and delivering to our supported institutions. These are also aimed at assisting the decision making process but in an institutional context rather than a course context.

Working with a course team meant that, as a group, ideas could be bandied about and the practicalities, suitability and local issues regarding the use of hardware and software could be considered as a group and introduced to a course in a more coherent way. The whole experience seemed to me to promote a very creative and positive experience with real commitment to making some changes and doing things a bit differently. Reservations about making what might be considered to be a significant departure from previous methods are understandable but I'm quite delighted that our Collaborative Course Design (CCD) initiative has got off to such a positive start.

Which comes first the Chicken or the Egg ?⤴

from @ eCurriculum Blog

Image by maymun from flickr licenced under Creative Commons This week saw the start of our new initiative aimed at supporting curriculum development in our region - we're calling it Collaborative Course Design (CCD) and beginning pilots in 3 of our supported institutions. My colleague and I spent 2 days this week working with a course team exploring technologies and how each can add value to the learning experiences both for the learners but also for the staff. It kind of brought home to me the chicken/egg nature of making decisions about how to exploit new technologies in general. In other words how do you know which technology to use unless you are exposed to them in an appropriate context.

Although I had a few concerns, the original plan for our sessions to explore and establish a common understanding of new technology was a good one. While individuals have ideas about the role of technology in the context of learning & teaching, ideas are constrained, quite naturally, by an individual's own experience and exposure to technology and software. I did wonder if spending time showing and explaining the scope and range of new learning technologies might be perceived as a waste of precious preparation time. However it became evident that a brief and concise demonstration provided enough of an insight for staff to quickly realise the potential of and application of new technologies for learning & teaching. The experience also supports our new 20 minute topic briefings aimed at senior & operational managers which we are offering and delivering to our supported institutions. These are also aimed at assisting the decision making process but in an institutional context rather than a course context.

Working with a course team meant that, as a group, ideas could be bandied about and the practicalities, suitability and local issues regarding the use of hardware and software could be considered as a group and introduced to a course in a more coherent way. The whole experience seemed to me to promote a very creative and positive experience with real commitment to making some changes and doing things a bit differently. Reservations about making what might be considered to be a significant departure from previous methods are understandable but I'm quite delighted that our Collaborative Course Design (CCD) initiative has got off to such a positive start.