Tag Archives: citizenship

Fake, Fiction or Fact? How can learners be helped to work out what’s true?⤴

from @ ICT for Teaching & Learning in Falkirk Primary Schools

There are so many choices for sources of news for learners to find out about what’s going on the world today, whether printed media, online news sites or social media. But how can learners be helped to be able to work out if what they are reading has any substance in fact, how accurate the information is, or what the biases are likely to be?

How can you spot fake news?

howtospotfakenewsinfographicHow to Spot Fake News – the IFLA (the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions), with thanks to www.factcheck.org, created an infographic detailing steps we can all take when trying to work out if what we are reading, hearing or watching is verifiable. This helps teach the skills of critical thinking and media literacy. This describes with visual representation 8 steps to take to help determine the likely authenticity of shared information: to consider the source, to read beyond the headline, the check credibility of the author, to look at linking sources, to check the date to see if current, to research to see if it’s satire, to consider your own biases and the likely ones of the source sharing the information, and to consult fact-checking sites. The infographic is available to download as either an image or in pdf format for printing.

takkfakenewsliteracy

Digital Literacy and “Fake News” – Resources to Help you help your students – many links collated by librarian-turned-technology-specialist Nancy Watson @nancywtech which help teachers guide their learners through ways to spot fake news and techniques to work out the authenticity of the shared information. The links include sites aimed at different age groups, teachers, younger learners, as well as for general public use. They include fact-checking sites as well as tips and advice to determining reliability of what is shared.

nwfakenewsepidemicDigital Literacy and the “Fake News” EpidemicNancy Watson has produced a superb resource for educators sharing a host of advice, tips and resources to support teachers support their learners to better be able to be discerning about the information shared online or in the print media. This includes examples of fake news and outlines the steps anyone can take to determine it to be factually inaccurate.

nprfakeorrealFake or real? How to self-check the news and get the facts – a post by digital news intern Wynne Davis describing the issue of fake news and giving practical advice for all ages about how to help determine whether what you are reading is true or fiction. Tips include checking the domain name (especially similar-sounding names), looking at quotations in the story (and checking up on who they are and anything known about them online), searching the quote itself to see if it properly attributed or taken out of context, check the comments to get a flavour of whether others call out the facts as being untrue and cite sources to back up their claims, reverse image search (right click on an image online and choose to search Google for it to see where else it is used and the context in which it is used).

Internet Archive and Wayback Machine

internetarchiveWouldn’t it be great if, when someone says content has changed on a website, or disappeared completely, that there was a way to look back at what was there beforehand? Well, The Internet Archive saves a huge amount of online content from many sources around the web (several hundred billion webpages!). This relies on the Wayback Machine (which is part of the Internet Archive) trawling on a regular basis for changed content. So if you search for a website and it is no longer available you can pop the weblink into the Wayback Machine (which is part of The Internet Archive) and look back at previous versions just by choosing a specific date. It will only be available for dates on which a trawl was made so is not available for every date but it’s still very impressive to be able to look at a website change over time and to be able to compare and contrast with versions over time.

savepagenowCan you save a web page on Wayback machine so it’s always there for future reference? Yes you can! You can simply capture a web page as it appears now for future use as a trusted citation in the future, or just to ensure it does not disappear when the original website changes or disappears. All you do is paste the weblink when you first find it on the Save Page Now” part of the Internet Archive site.

Fact-checking sites

There are a number of sites which can be used to verify whether stories (particularly those which appear on social media and spread like wildfire) have any basis in fact or whether they are urban myths, or out and out lies or propaganda. These include Politifact, Snopes, and Factcheck.org

Do you think you read with your bias? What bias does the writer have?

biasesaffectingusallBiases which affect us all – an infographic created by Business Insider which lists and describes 20 biases which we can all have when we read, hear or share information. Whether it’s a tendency to have a reliance on the first piece of information we hear, whether we are influenced by hearing the same information shared by a group, whether the information confirms what we already believed, stereotyping, or information which implies cause and effect, or many more – this infographic provides a useful starting point for discussing with learners the range of influences on us all when we all read or hear information.

 

‘You know you are a Global Educator when you…’ [a book by @julielindsay] #intelvisionaries⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

Julie opening slide

I’ve known Julie Lindsay online (mainly through Twitter) for what seems like a very long time. I particularly remember some of her early work around the Flat Classroom Project that she co-founded with Vicki Davis (AKA: @coolcatteacher) back in 2006. We also share a joint early influencer in the form of David Warlick (@dwarlick) who was one of the first people to inspire me to think differently about how we use technology in schools back in 2005.

Julie is a passionate educator with a particular interest and specialisation in global education. This specialism is not surprising considering she is Australian but worked across Asia, Africa and the Middle East in a variety of international schools and universities. As well as working physically in these places Julie also has extensive experience of connecting and collaborating with hundreds of educators online.

The Global EducatorJulie was at ISTE 2016 to launch her new book, “The Global Educator”. I read the first few chapters of her book when she gave me a signed copy in Colorado last summer and I finished it off over the recent Christmas break (which now seems like a long time ago!).

Not a lot of new stuff for me personally but I can see what a useful guide this might be for someone just starting out.

Julie proposes six things that might help educators know if they were global educators or not. The six things aren't meant to be exhaustive and are really just really a guide or a self-evaluation tool.

Julie says, you know you are a Global Educator when you…

  • Connect and share - eg: has an understanding of ‘connectivism’ and networked learning, builds a personal learning network, establishes a strong global brand, contributes oneline globally daily as part of established workflow, etc.
  • ‘Flatten’ the learning - eg: learns about the world with the world, is able to sustain connections and collaborations. Understands that learning in a digital world means working with others at a distance and online, etc.
  • Encorage and model global citizenship - eg: fosters global competency through global context, has empathy learning with other cultures, adopts and encourages multiple perspectives, etc.
  • Collaborate anywhere, anytime - eg: collaborates with anyone, anywhere, anytime, in anyway possible, is adept at teacher sourcing, builds on-line global communities, etc.
  • Use online technology - eg: is able to use both synchronous and asynchronous online technologies to bring learners together, knows how to use the web to publish global experiences, is digitally fluent across devices and software, etc.
  • Design futuristic learning environments to connect with the world - eg: is able to design learning in order to develop students global competencies, in conversant with design thinking, understands the importance of collaboration as a global learning objective, etc.

In her book Julie builds on these six principles and goes into more depth about what they mean as well as providing some nice little real life examples. I personally found the list quite re-assuring but it certainly got me reflecting and thinking about how many of my staff would actually be able to tick of some (or all) of these things as regular practice.

Another part of Julie’s work that I liked was her thoughts on an Online Global Collaboration Taxonomy. Show in the picture below:

Global Collaboration Taxonomy



Overall, lots to think about and a guide that I am sure I will dip in and out of from time to time.

Learners engaging with their learning with Yammer⤴

from @ ICT for Teaching & Learning in Falkirk Primary Schools

YammerlogoYammer – so what is it and why use in school?

Yammer is an online discussion/collaboration tool which provides schools with a secure online environment where all pupils in a class can ask questions of their peers, where they can seek answers and help each other, bounce ideas around and deepen their own understanding of what they are learning in class. It is available to all users of Office 365 for Education, meaning all Glow users, pupils and staff, have access to this tool. And it can be accessed by signing in online in a browser or using a mobile device app.

Yammer provides an ideal tool through which learners can learn about the use of social media, in a protected environment, where the pupils can be guided to model behaviours for use in an online discussion tool, which will apply to any social media tool pupils may meet outwith their schooling. So if a teacher is looking to help pupils learn about safe sharing, and what not to share online, being supportive and respectful of views of others, and a place for pupils to engage in deepening their understanding through questioning and responding to others, then Yammer provides a great environment for a school.

yammeronwaffleHow do pupils and teachers get started using Yammer?

  1. Glow users simply sign into Glow then navigate to any part of Office 365, such as the tile for Office 365 (School Site) and then click on the 9-square waffle icon to navigate to the range of tools available in Office 365 – and choose the Yammer tile.
  2. The very first time a user clicks on the Yammer tile they will be invited to invite further users – don’t invite others but instead just close that window (click on the greyed-out cross at the top-right or click on the background page behind the invitation panel.
  3. You will be presented with the terms of use of Yammer – read these and then click on the button to acknowledge you agree to abide by them.
  4. You’re then in Yammer and can start browsing some of the Yammer groups open to all users. Or, if a pupil is ready to join the private class Yammer group set up by their teacher, then the first time the pupil simply searches for the class group name, clicks on the link and requests to join by clicking on the “join group” button – that sends a message to the teacher who accepts their pupils into the group.

Alternatively, rather than go to Glow first, users can search with an online search engine for Yammer or go straight to https://www.yammer.com where they can then simply log in using their Glow/Office 365 email address and password.

How do you set up a Yammer group just for pupils and teachers in a class?

  1. A class teacher can quickly set up a private class group in Yammer. Click on “+ Create a new group” and then give the group a name – include in the group name something which identifies the school as well as the class name.
  2. Choose “Private – Only approved members” and untick the box which gives the option to “List in Group Directory” – that way only pupils who know what to search for will be able to find a teacher’s Yammer class group, and only pupils who the teachers knows are members of their class will be granted access by the teacher. Setting up that way avoids the teachers having to add a list of usernames – they simply tell their class what to search for, and to click on the “join group” button when they find the group.
  3. A teacher can see the list of pupils waiting to be added to their class yammer group by going into the Yammer group and then clicking on “Members” at the right-hand side. This will show which users have requested access and are pending approval by the teacher.
  4. It would be recommended to have additional teacher colleagues added as joint administrators – beside their name on the list of members just click on the cog icon and select “Make admin” to elevate that teacher to be a joint administrator of that Yammer group.

What can you do in a Yammer discussion?

You can ask questions, respond to requests from others, add comments or create polls to garner views of others. Attachments can be added to any discussion post – so pupils can perhaps discuss or share comments about a resource. You can even use the “praise” button to acknowledge the input of other users. A Yammer group provides a place to share resources, and links to related sites elsewhere.

How are schools using Yammer?

KirknewtonPSKirknewton Primary School in West Lothian has provided an excellent description of how they are using Yammer with pupils. This blogpost gives screenshots of different aspects to how they use Yammer, as well as the rationale to the choice of tool and the purposes behind it to better support learning and teaching. This has included using Yammer to support collaborative writing. Mrs Anderson, Principal Teacher at the school said “As a teacher and parent I feel that it is very important that we educate children about the safe use of social media – using Yammer has been a fantastic way to do so, in a safe environment. Feedback from parents has been positive.” “The impact on learning and teaching is evident in the content of the group and the enthusiasm of pupils (which is evident in the online interactions).” 

https://blogs.glowscotland.org.uk/glowblogs/glowgallery/portfolio/kirknewton-primary-school-sharing-approaches-to-glow-yammer/

BearsdenPSBearsden Primary School in East Dunbartonshire – teacher Athole McLauchlan describes in at this link about the use of Yammer with pupils in the school https://blogs.glowscotland.org.uk/glowblogs/glowgallery/portfolio/using-yammer-as-a-social-media-channel-for-learners-and-learning/

 

What safeguards are in place for Yammer users in Glow?

Yammer groups can be set up to be private (such as for a class of pupils so that the Yammer group can only be accessed by pupils in that class with their teachers). There are also Yammer groups open to users across Glow and educators within Glow nationally act as Moderators for Yammer users, welcoming new users, helping guide users to use appropriate language in a supportive way.

Everything in Yammer is identifiable to the individual user. There is a simple “report a concern” option for all users (either use the question mark icon on a page or anywhere you see a “Report a concern” button) which will alert the national Glow administrators to concerns raised, and who will provide the support required to resolve any issues.

There’s also a filter to ensure inappropriate language can’t accidentally be posted.

And of course the educational-focussed environment shared between learners and educators means there is a visible supportive environment. Users can set email alerts either to all posts in a specific Yammer group, or to individual posts where alerts would be sent for replies or comments just to that post.

MobileAppsYammer Mobile App

Yammer has an app for mobile devices – search on the app store for your device. Then once downloaded simply log in with your Glow/Office 365 email address (that’s where your Glow username has @glow.sch.uk added to the end, after your Glow username). For many users the use of the app will be the most convenient way to access Yammer.

What help is available?

Day One Guide for the Glow Yammer Network (accessed using Glow account – but also available as a document download from the public-access site Yammer Guide for Glow Users) – a very helpful guide of do things to do, and things to avoid, as well as guides to getting the most out of Yammer, specially in the early stages of getting used to using Yammer in a school.

Yammer Guide for Glow Users – a Glow-specific help guide to getting started with the use of Glow. This includes guidance and suggestions for managing Yammer in an educational context.

So how are you using Yammer in your school?

Do share in the comments below how Yammer is being used in your school

 

 

Genocide and Srebrenica⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

srebrenica2For anyone working on discrimination, the Holocaust and genocide, there’s a new education resource for secondary teachers based on the Srebrenica experience 20 years ago during the Bosnian civil war. It has been produced by a UK charity, Remembering Srebrenica, and the Scottish edition has just been launched. http://www.srebrenica.org.uk/news/free-education-pack-helps-scottish-children-learn-lessons-from-srebrenica/

– you have to register to get access, on the website’s resources/education packs page.

 

Putting the ‘character’ in 140 characters: my first ScotEdChat⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

Last night I hosted my first #ScotEdChat on Twitter. It is the third chat so far having accidentally started the ball rolling a few weeks ago. The first chat happened on 5th November hosted by @MrsPert1, the second on 12th hosted by @athole. Next week the host will be @DrewBurrett. Having started with basically zero followers, […]

InsideLearningTechnology Ep 4: The Push Me Pull You Conversation⤴

from @ Laurie O'Donnell

masthead_image1_1285715561

Had another great evening on Wednesday with Matthew Boyle of Inside Learning fame.

Matthew invited me to join him for Episode 4 InsideLearningTechnology.

I was asked some great questions and think this podcast is probably the best summary of  how my thinking on learning and technology has evolved over the years.

We followed this conversation by joining Steve and John Lloyd for a wide ranging discussion on citizenship, health, personal and social education – InsideLearning Episode 85: The Long Goodnight.

All in all a great way to spend an evening.

Gay Teachers!⤴

from

I’m an openly gay teacher – I am proud of who I am as a person and what I have achieved, but that is it… I am a person, gay isn’t everything about me yet I feel in the world in which we live where ‘That’s so Gay’ is used on a daily basis by our young people and young LGBT students are committing suicide because of who they are I honestly feel I have to ‘wave my flag’ so to speak.

I recently came across this on a website…

One of his teachers is a gay male and is very obvious with it. And I think that makes for a bad influnence in the schools where our children are learning. It is bad enough their peers are influencing them and we have to guard them against drugs, and unprotected pre-martial sex, but now we have to deal with gay teachers. They are at the age where they are very impressionable, and seeing this may have some effect on them. I want to hear from everyone on this topic, whether you agree with me or not.

to which one replied….

A gay teacher preaching gay tolerance should not be allowed within a school.

Should our young people (gay or straight or anything in between) not have role models to look up… role models that they see on a daily basis? Why do School officials feel the need to say that gay issues are ‘delicate’ topics – isn’t everything these days? Maybe we need to stop wrapping our young people up in cotton wool and let them experience the wonderful diversity we have in our country without being worried what the ‘parents will think’.

I am a gay teacher and I teach about acceptance for all… yet I feel It’s frowned upon… yet maybe a black teacher teaching about racism, or a disabled teacher teaching about difference or a Jewish teacher teaching about the Holocaust  shouldn’t be encouraged either?

I walk into a classroom and see a photo of a fellow teacher with their husband or wife… what if I put a photo of my partner and myself up? Would anything be said? Happen? Maybe i’m thinking the worst.

The issue we are facing is that it’s not the young people we teach accepting openly gay teachers, they see gay people on TV, in Magazines etc all the time… but it’s the thoughts of the parents and colleagues.

Harvey Milk said… ”I was raised by heteosexual parents, taught by heterosexual teachers, lived in a fiercely heterosexual society, so why am I homosexual?”

Stonewall Scotland says ‘Gay teachers and staff should be out wherever possible. It’s good to be able to talk to a gay teacher about gay stuff rather than talk to a heterosexual teacher because they have probably experienced bullying and coming out. But teachers don’t want to come out in school because it’s such a hostile environment.’

As teachers… we are all role models… and we all have the ability to make a difference!

Gay Teachers!⤴

from

I’m an openly gay teacher – I am proud of who I am as a person and what I have achieved, but that is it… I am a person, gay isn’t everything about me yet I feel in the world in which we live where ‘That’s so Gay’ is used on a daily basis by our young people and young LGBT students are committing suicide because of who they are I honestly feel I have to ‘wave my flag’ so to speak.

I recently came across this on a website…

One of his teachers is a gay male and is very obvious with it. And I think that makes for a bad influnence in the schools where our children are learning. It is bad enough their peers are influencing them and we have to guard them against drugs, and unprotected pre-martial sex, but now we have to deal with gay teachers. They are at the age where they are very impressionable, and seeing this may have some effect on them. I want to hear from everyone on this topic, whether you agree with me or not.

to which one replied….

A gay teacher preaching gay tolerance should not be allowed within a school.

Should our young people (gay or straight or anything in between) not have role models to look up… role models that they see on a daily basis? Why do School officials feel the need to say that gay issues are ‘delicate’ topics – isn’t everything these days? Maybe we need to stop wrapping our young people up in cotton wool and let them experience the wonderful diversity we have in our country without being worried what the ‘parents will think’.

I am a gay teacher and I teach about acceptance for all… yet I feel It’s frowned upon… yet maybe a black teacher teaching about racism, or a disabled teacher teaching about difference or a Jewish teacher teaching about the Holocaust  shouldn’t be encouraged either?

I walk into a classroom and see a photo of a fellow teacher with their husband or wife… what if I put a photo of my partner and myself up? Would anything be said? Happen? Maybe i’m thinking the worst.

The issue we are facing is that it’s not the young people we teach accepting openly gay teachers, they see gay people on TV, in Magazines etc all the time… but it’s the thoughts of the parents and colleagues.

Harvey Milk said… “I was raised by heteosexual parents, taught by heterosexual teachers, lived in a fiercely heterosexual society, so why am I homosexual?”

Stonewall Scotland says ‘Gay teachers and staff should be out wherever possible. It’s good to be able to talk to a gay teacher about gay stuff rather than talk to a heterosexual teacher because they have probably experienced bullying and coming out. But teachers don’t want to come out in school because it’s such a hostile environment.’

As teachers… we are all role models… and we all have the ability to make a difference!

New York! New York!⤴

from

So our senior school pupils are back from a weeks trip to New York, New York and what an amazing trip it was!

The week started by flying from Edinburgh to New York (via London) and arriving into the city that never sleeps at night. The pupils experienced the buzz of Times Square as they walked from their central hotel for a Chinese late dinner.

Waking up in the morning we made our way to Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island where the wind was icy and snow was still lying on the ground. Having met Ranger Joanna (Or Ranger Dan as we called her) we learnt about Lady Liberty and Liberty island. Ellis Island is always an amazing place and pupils spent some time being shown round and looking at the history of immigartion to the USA.

Our evening meal at Planet Hollywood was great with memorbella from Broadway Shows and Movies were around us… 44 students then ran round Times Square trying to complete a challenge that got them use to the area but asked them to get photographic evidence of all the tasks on the page (lots of photos of hotdogs, yellow taxi’s, poses and NYPD)

We left our hotel the following morning and took a wonder to Ground Zero, Wall Street and The Greenwhich village. Our evening meal was at Bubba Gumps (Famous from Forrest Gump) and then we spend Valentine Day evening on the 88th floor of the Empire State building… at hurricane force winds and ruining a few couples wedding proposals…

We took a lovely walk to the American Natural History Museum where the pupils spent the morning looking at the wonderful history of the nation we were visiting, including some famous faces from ‘Night at the Museum’. We took a peaceful walk through Central Park, seeing some famous film locations before heading to the Hard Rock Cafe for dinner. We then finished our day at Spiderman – The Musical (Turn off the Dark) and eh… well… visually stunning but I think we might have seen a Broadway Flop… the critics are still out on that one!

A packed day followed as we headed off to the United Nations Building and I for one was impressed at how good it was. We later went onto NBC studios and went on a guided tour of this iconic television building. After dinner back at the Empire State Building some of the group went to see the New York Knicks play in their home town, whilst others went onto shop at the worlds biggest department store… MACY’s.

The pupils had a free day for shopping on 5th Avenue before heading to Little Italy for dinner and then the group split and some went to do more sightseeing in Times Square whilst others went to see ‘American Idiot’ a Broadway Show by Greenday and some others went to see ‘Mamma Mia’ on Broadway.

Our final day was spent doing various things including some final shopping as well as a trip to the MOMA before we headed to the airport and flew home (via London)

PHEW… we were shattered but had an

New York! New York!⤴

from

So our senior school pupils are back from a weeks trip to New York, New York and what an amazing trip it was!

The week started by flying from Edinburgh to New York (via London) and arriving into the city that never sleeps at night. The pupils experienced the buzz of Times Square as they walked from their central hotel for a Chinese late dinner.

Waking up in the morning we made our way to Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island where the wind was icy and snow was still lying on the ground. Having met Ranger Joanna (Or Ranger Dan as we called her) we learnt about Lady Liberty and Liberty island. Ellis Island is always an amazing place and pupils spent some time being shown round and looking at the history of immigartion to the USA.

Our evening meal at Planet Hollywood was great with memorbella from Broadway Shows and Movies were around us… 44 students then ran round Times Square trying to complete a challenge that got them use to the area but asked them to get photographic evidence of all the tasks on the page (lots of photos of hotdogs, yellow taxi’s, poses and NYPD)

We left our hotel the following morning and took a wonder to Ground Zero, Wall Street and The Greenwhich village. Our evening meal was at Bubba Gumps (Famous from Forrest Gump) and then we spend Valentine Day evening on the 88th floor of the Empire State building… at hurricane force winds and ruining a few couples wedding proposals…

We took a lovely walk to the American Natural History Museum where the pupils spent the morning looking at the wonderful history of the nation we were visiting, including some famous faces from ‘Night at the Museum’. We took a peaceful walk through Central Park, seeing some famous film locations before heading to the Hard Rock Cafe for dinner. We then finished our day at Spiderman – The Musical (Turn off the Dark) and eh… well… visually stunning but I think we might have seen a Broadway Flop… the critics are still out on that one!

A packed day followed as we headed off to the United Nations Building and I for one was impressed at how good it was. We later went onto NBC studios and went on a guided tour of this iconic television building. After dinner back at the Empire State Building some of the group went to see the New York Knicks play in their home town, whilst others went onto shop at the worlds biggest department store… MACY’s.

The pupils had a free day for shopping on 5th Avenue before heading to Little Italy for dinner and then the group split and some went to do more sightseeing in Times Square whilst others went to see ‘American Idiot’ a Broadway Show by Greenday and some others went to see ‘Mamma Mia’ on Broadway.

Our final day was spent doing various things including some final shopping as well as a trip to the MOMA before we headed to the airport and flew home (via London)

PHEW… we were shattered but had an