Tag Archives: Career Education

Civil engineering apprenticeship has laid foundation for Sophia’s career⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Taking a Foundation Apprenticeship gave Sophia Findlay the chance to find out what a career in engineering would be like and now it’s cemented her plans for the future.

The 17-year-old from Springboig in Glasgow was planning to leave school at the end of fifth year and didn’t know what she wanted to do for a living.

Then, her mum told her about opportunities through Foundation Apprenticeships.

The St. Andrew’s RC Secondary pupil chose to take a Foundation Apprenticeship in Civil Engineering in fifth year, alongside other school subjects.

Foundation Apprenticeships give senior school pupils the chance to spend time out of the classroom with a learning provider and gain experience in a work environment.

Completion leads to a qualification at the same level as a Higher, to progress into work including Modern and Graduate Apprenticeships as well as being recognised for entry into colleges and universities across Scotland.

Sophia explained: “I had no real plan about what I wanted to do and thought I could maybe go to college and take up an art course.

“My mum told me about Foundation Apprenticeships and thought it would be worth doing because I would get work experience with a qualification and be able to stay in school until sixth year.”

Sophia took the Foundation Apprenticeship in Civil Engineering at Glasgow Kelvin College alongside her other school subjects.

In the first year, Sophia went to college two half days a week.  “My first year at college was really good” said Sophia. “I wasn’t sure what to expect, but there were also two other girls doing the Foundation Apprenticeship, so I felt more comfortable. The learning eased us in well because we weren’t bombarded with a lot of information.”

Now Sophia’s out of school one day a week getting her hands dirty, working on building sites with social housing developer, McTaggart Construction.

“At the moment I get to watch and learn,” said Sophia. “I’m looking forward to learn on the job and get hands on experience.”

Doing the Foundation Apprenticeship has opened her eyes up to different aspects of engineering Sophia didn’t know about, which has now given her a clear idea of what career she wants to pursue.

Sophia said: “I got to find out more about the career choices in Civil Engineering through the Foundation Apprenticeship and I thought they were fascinating.

“There is an opportunity to work in areas like flood protection and environmental protection, which really appeals to me because they are dealing with important issues.”

Ross Hammell, Sustainable Communities Programme Manager at McTaggart Construction:

“McTaggart Construction sees FA’s as a key element of our talent pipeline mix, alongside other traditional academic and vocational routes. The construction industry needs many more confident, hardworking young people across all disciplines to address the current skills shortage we face. The world of work can be a shock to a lot of school leavers, therefore FA’s offer the opportunity to gain a true understanding of a potential career path before they’ve even left school.”

“Since starting her FA with McTaggart Construction, Sophia has gained a lot of confidence which has enabled her to ask more questions and get more from her time on site, applying academic learning.”

Taking the Foundation Apprenticeship has changed Sophia’s opinion of school.

She explained: “Taking the Foundation Apprenticeship has given me something to look forward to and I’m excited to learn what the career would be like.

“Getting the experience of college and the workplace with my Foundation Apprenticeship has made me happier and more confident.”

Peter Brown, Senior Curriculum Manager from Glasgow Kelvin College said: “The Foundation Apprenticeship programme provides a range of benefits to our learners, chief among these being the opportunity to undertake a long-term work placement with an employer.

“During this time learners are given an invaluable insight into the world of work and a hands-on experience which inspires and shapes their future career paths whilst also preparing and equipping them with skills that are valued by industry.

“Furthermore, the Foundation Apprenticeship offers them the opportunity to learn in a programme and environment that has been solely designed with employment in mind.   Subjects they are currently studying at school e.g. Maths, Physics or IT are given real-world value through contextualisation and simulation of industry.  As a result, many learners better engage at school as abstract concepts now have real meaning and importance to their future career aspirations.”

Foundation Apprenticeships are developed by Skills Development Scotland, in partnership with employers and funded by European Social Fund.

TES feature: Primary career education should broaden children’s horizons⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

By Nich Chambers for TES

The focus for primary schools shouldn’t be on ‘careers advice’ but on ‘career-related learning’, argues Nick Chambers

The last few months have seen a sudden enthusiasm for careers education in primary schools. Of course, it is a simple and seductive idea.
But many teachers and parents have expressed their concerns that we risk making our children grow up too fast. They are understandably concerned about the dangers in directing children towards a particular career or job at a time when their aspirations should be wide-ranging and, in large part, without boundaries.
I share their concerns. We should not be providing careers advice in primary schools: instead we should focus on broadening horizons and raising aspirations, giving children a wide range of experiences including the world of work. It is about opening doors, showing children the vast range of possibilities and helping to keep their options open for as long as possible.
And there are a range of attributes, skills and behaviours that can be encouraged in this early stage of a child’s life that will leave them in the best possible position as they begin their transitions to secondary education and to future life.
There is often alarm, too, when people hear or read the word ‘careers’ in the same sentence as primary schools. In my opinion, the focus for primary schools shouldn’t be on ‘careers advice’ but on what I refer to as ‘career-related learning’.
Teachers would tend to agree. Our recent survey, in partnership with Tes and the NAHT headteachers’ union, found that the majority of teachers believe that children should be learning about the world of work and different jobs in their first years of primary school. Nearly half (47 per cent) believed this should start from age five and under and that linking learning to the real world helped increase motivation, broaden aspirations and challenge gender stereotypes.
Politicians, too, are on side. Robert Halfon MP, chair of the Commons Education Select Committee was spot on in saying in Tes recently: “The impact of early engagement can have a hugely positive impact on wider academic attainment, motivating and inspiring both children and their families, by helping them to see a future to which they can aspire and which feels achievable.”
Earlier this year we tried to explore this a little further by exploring who primary-aged children ideally want to become, and, what shapes (and often limits) their career aspirations and dreams for the future. Drawing the Future asked children aged 7 to 11 to draw a picture of the job they wanted to do when they grew up. More than 13,000 children took part in the UK and it was clear that, from a young age, many children had ideas about careers. Some 36 per cent of children from as young as seven years old, based their career aspirations on people they knew. For those who didn’t know anyone who did the job they drew, 45 per cent stated that TV, film and radio were the biggest factors influencing their choice.
Meanwhile, less than 1 per cent of children knew about a job from someone visiting their school. This has huge implications for social mobility, as children from poorer backgrounds may not have access to successful role models from the world of work and their aspirations are limited as a result.
All children, regardless of their background should get the chance to meet a wide range of people doing different jobs, in different sectors and at different levels – from apprentices to CEOs.
This is essential if we are to improve social mobility and gender and ethnic equality. It is vital we support children to challenge the perceptions they may have about certain jobs, and to better understand the evolving world they are growing up in while they are still in primary school.
While teachers appreciate the importance to children of career-related learning many say that the lack of time and availability of volunteers are preventing them doing more. The NAHT has taken a lead to tackle this and created Primary Futures in partnership with my charity, Education and Employers.

Emma Fieldhouse from South Parade Primary school in Wakefield explains why her school got involved: “It was amazing to see the children talking and listening to the volunteers, and each other, as they begin to make the link between what they do in school every day and the exciting world of the future where they will be the next scientists, teachers, politicians, vets”.
We must not rest until we see this kind of ambition running through all of our students in all of our primary schools.

Nick Chambers is the founder and chief executive officer of the charity Education and Employers. The charity runs Inspiring the Future and its Primary Futures and Inspiring Women programmes and undertakes research into the effectiveness of employer engagement

SDS Event: ‘Ensuring Foundation Apprenticeships are at the heart of the curriculum’ – catch up⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

A thought-provoking event on the further expansion of Foundation Apprenticeships across the country has taken place in August with a number of inspirational presentation s by gues speakers:

Presentation – Damien Yeates
Presentation – Tony McDaid
Presentation – Diane Greenlees
Presentation – Philip Black
Fife case study
South Lanarkshire case study
East Renfrewshire case study
Glasgow case study
Perth and Kinross case study

If you would like a colleague from Skills Development Scotland to get in touch regarding Foundation Apprenticeships, contact SDS at conference@sds.co.uk .

Impetus – Ready for Work report: The capabilities young people need to find and keep work!⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

In case you haven seen this report so far:

This Ready for Work (2014) report, produced by Impetus-PEF in partnership with the Young Foundation and the Social Research Unit at Dartington (SRU), seeks to provide practical answers to the question: how can we help young people be ready for work? The study aims to support those who fund, invest in or provide services to improve the employability of young people – including our main concern, young people from disadvantaged background.  

It identifies six essential capabilities that young people are expected to demonstrate in order to get and keep a job:

Self-awareness, Receptiveness, Drive, being Self-assured, Resilience and being Informed.

The report also reflected on a number of programmes or interventions with a proven record of success, providing valuable thoughts and information as people develop and implement strategies within their respective contexts.

You can access the report here:  2014_09-Ready-for-Work

DYW Moray releases new career videos⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

DYW Regional Group in Moray involved 15 pupils to plan, film and edit 6 films for use in any educational context to show young people what career opportunities are available to them in growth sectors in the local authority.

The films are focussed on 6 Growth Sectors identified in the Moray Skills Framework launched in May 2017 by the Moray Council.  We now would like the film to be used as much as possible to inform our young people better about potential career paths available to them – examples of usage may be at careers events; to assist with the delivery of courses within schools/colleges; to generally promote the Moray area for work etc.

Please follow the link below and scroll down to the section that says “Careers in Moray – Films for Educational Usage”.

https://www.dywmoray.co.uk/education

Teachers, Lecturers and Employers are more than welcome to use them to show to our young people in Moray the Careers Available to them.   Please can you pass on this email to any of your colleagues who would find it of value to see or use the films.

The films are also available on our YouTube page.  Please click on the links below for each video.

  1. Early Learning and Childcare Sector Film – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tVtmjGMz6bU
  2. Food, Drink & Tourism Sector Film – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KvdIsrynuhc
  3. Engineering Sector Film – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K6SYWiz89Tc
  4. Creative Industries & IT – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txfUIjYhay0
  5. Business/Professional Services Sector Film – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U8ruawNL-mo
  6. Land Based Sector Film – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mX77i4dvNdM

 

Also, if you haven’t yet noticed on our social media pages, there is a number of photos that were taken from our Moray’s Aspiring Film Trainee Awards (MAFTAs) on Monday evening.  This event launched the films and recognised all of the pupils involved in the project.  You can find these photos on the Facebook page “DYW More in Moray” – https://www.facebook.com/DYWMoreInMoray/.

Calderglen High School – top for positive leavers’ destination in South Lanarkshire⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Calderglen HS’s ambitions around Developing the Young Workforce  are paying dividends with the school becoming the leaders in positive and sustained leavers’ destinations in South Lanarkshire.

The schools newsletter  provides an inspiring account of learners seizing opportunities to enhance their life experience and develop skills for life and work through a broad range of activities, all part of their DYW implementation.  Access the Sept 2017 DYW newsletter.

The school features as ‘interesting practice’ exemplar on the National Improvement Hub for their innovative and consistent  approach to career education.

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Interesting practice exemplar: St Andrew’s Academy – weaving employability into the senior phase curriculum⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

St Andrew’s RC Secondary School in Glasgow has adopted an innovative approach to their senior phase curriculum design which includes an employability stand  alongside a two year Higher and traditional pathway model from S4 to S6.

The following document and presentation sets out the importance of this particular design feature, the challenges the school faced and the lessons they are learning from the ongoing evaluations of their curriculum design. Evidence about success of the design focuses on improved outcomes for young people.

Other senior phase curriculum models can be accessed on the National Improvement Hub here.  Support materials around senior phase design are now also available on the hub here.

Also noteworthy is the radical curriculum design at Craigroyston Community High School which unapologetically focuses on learner destination only. More on this here, as well as in this  presentation at the SFL 2017:  Craigroyston CHS.  There are also tangible links with the Scottish Attainment Challenge and PEF documented here.

 

 

Career Education Standard 3 – 18: Suite of Learning Resources⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

A suite of learning resources are currently being produced to  career standardssupport professional  development related to career education.  These resources  will cover a variety of key themes such as labour market information, career management skills, enterprise and entrepreneurship, My world of Work etc. and relate this to Career Education Standard 3-18.

Learning outcomes

As a result of engaging with this learning you will have:

  • an understanding of the purpose and aim of the Career Education Standard (3 – 18) (CES);
  • an understanding of the part you are expected to play, along with partners, in the implementation of the CES;
  • an understanding of the entitlements for children and young people;
  • developed, through self-evaluation, your understanding of the CES expectations in relation to your current practice;
  • identified areas of the CES expectations for your professional learning; and
  • a plan to take forward manageable changes to your practice.

Who is this learning for?

The resources  contribute to professional learning for practitioners at all levels working with children and young people within early learning and childcare, primary, secondary, special schools, colleges, private training providers, third sector providers, social work, community learning and development and other specialist learning providers including secure and residential settings.

Learning resources

Learning Resource 1:  An Introduction to the Career Education Standard 3-18

This resource introduces you to the standard, its context, purpose and expectations in a logical and manageable format. The materials include a self-evaluation tool and contain references to How good is our school? (4th Edition). Engaging with this professional learning resource will help you build on your existing practice.

Downloads :

The following resources are currently in development:

  • Learning Resources 2:  An Introduction to Labour Market Information
  • Learning Resources 3:  An Introduction to Career Management Skills
  • Learning Resources 4:  An Introduction to my World of Work
  • Learning Resources 2:  An Introduction to Enterprise Education

DYW – Youth Employment Strategy: Overview and milestones until 2018⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Developing the Young Workforce is a seven-year programme that aims to better prepare children and young people from 3–18 for the world of work.

This programme builds on the foundations already in place as part of Curriculum for Excellence.

The programme’s headline aim is to reduce youth unemployment by 40% by 2021.

Background

The final report of the Wood Commission for Developing Scotland’s Young Workforce was published in June 2014. It found broad agreement that all of our young people are entitled to an educational experience that is relevant to the world of work.

This is not just about education and training nor is it just about getting youth unemployment levels back to 2008 levels. It is about Scotland’s long term economic success and wellbeing … This will need strong leadership and firm commitments across the education and business sectors and in national and local government to deliver the changes.

Sir Ian Wood (Education Working For All! Commission for Developing Scotland’s Young Workforce Final Report – Tuesday, June 3, 2014)

The Government’s response to this report was published in the form of a Youth Employment Strategy, with a focus on improving work experience, careers information, advice and guidance and providing greater access to vocational learning.

The Youth Employment Strategy summarises the ambitions for local authorities, schools and their partners under the following key themes:

  • Expanding the offer – increasing the route from schools into employment, or further education which is closely linked to employment;
  • Promoting and shaping the offer – engaging with young people, parents, teachers and practitioners, partners and employers;
  • Supporting teachers and practitioners to develop children’s and young people’s learning about the world of work;
  • Providing earlier relevant, labour-market focussed career advice when young people need it, leading to better outcomes;
  • Embedding meaningful employer involvement;
  • Consolidating partnership working with colleges and other training providers.

The strategy also includes milestones for the next seven years across all sectors, challenging schools, colleges and employers to embrace the recommendations and implement the measures required to effect lasting change.

Downloadable documents

PDF file: Developing the young workforce – Scotland’s youth employment strategy (685 KB)

The milestones across all five ‘Changed Themes’  for 2014 -18 have been collated in the following documents:

Word file: Developing the young workforce – Milestones for 2014/15 (37 KB)

Word file: Developing the young workforce – Milestones for 2015/16 (40 KB)

Word file: Developing the young workforce – Milestones for 2016/17 (74 KB)

Word file: Developing the young workforce – Milestones for 2017/18 (56 KB)

Helping you to help pupils make subject to career connections⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

sharon-orourkeSharon O’Rourke, Skills Development Scotland

Helping young people make connections between what they are learning in classrooms and the world of work they’ll enter when they leave school has been brought into sharp focus by Building the Curriculum 4, the Career Education Standard and of course, Developing the Young Workforce.

Embedding career information and advice web service My World of Work into lessons, using SDS’s newly developed ‘lesson inserts’, is our way of helping you to make that connection for young people without needing to be a career expert yourself.

What are lesson inserts?

Lesson inserts are our answer to the common pupil question ‘why are we doing this?’

Co-created with teachers, for teachers, these are short, easy-to-use and adaptable activities, linking curriculum topics to careers by using the wealth of information on My World of Work.

The lesson inserts use the ‘plan on a page’ format. All essential information is in one place, brief and to the point, so you don’t need a lot of preparation time to use them; just pick it up and it’s ready to go. They are also flexible enough for teachers to expand or shorten the activities to meet the needs of their lesson.

How it works in practice

The short activities set out a range of ways to help young people make career connections.

These could be links to a job profile or film lasting only a few minutes featuring a person working in a certain career. For example during a biology lesson on dissection, a link to the job profile for a pathologist has a handy video showing the job in action.

Alternatively, individual or group exercises can encourage deeper careers research by perhaps asking pupils to complete a quiz or worksheet which requires searching My World of Work for the answers.

Or perhaps the activity might be given as homework to pupils to research jobs on My World of Work that are related to your subject with an action to discuss any common skills across them all in your next lesson.

At Whitburn Academy, Computing Science teachers are using the lesson inserts to show pupils and their parents how vital the subject is across a variety of careers. They are designing activities that mix careers research with practical programming activities to show the link to modern day jobs, such as Web or Games design, as well as the part programming plays in more traditional trades, such as electrician. This encourages young people to understand the breadth of opportunity their subject offers.  The teachers used the subject choice tool to research careers information for their lesson inserts, which they said increased their confidence to promote the subject in school and at parents’ evenings.

Keeping it current

As you know, My World of Work is part of the range of support on offer from Skills Development Scotland.

The information it holds is regularly updated, ensuring pupils are always accessing the most up-to-date information possible.

Using links to My World of Work helps young people develop career management skills and widens their career horizons as they become more informed about the career choices available to them.

Using My World of Work also provides the opportunity for teachers to build their career intelligence, whilst increasing their knowledge of what’s available on the site from the perspective, not just of a teacher, but as an individual, and perhaps as a parent as well.

Get Involved

We are still early in the process of creating lesson inserts, and are keen to work with teachers across all subjects to create more.

Examples of the lesson inserts that have recently been developed with teachers can be found in the partner area of My World of Work.

If you’re not registered or haven’t used the range of resources we have for teachers on My World of Work, why not sign up as a partner today and get involved?

The partner development and integration (PD&I) team at SDS are here to support you every step of the way. We really believe that these lesson inserts can be a useful, inspiring tool to support learning in your classroom.

We all want to see young people go on to successful and fulfilling careers when they leave school.

These lesson inserts are another way for us all to support them to do just that.

If you’d like to get involved email sharon.orourke@sds.co.uk