Tag Archives: Career Education Standard

Boosting young people’s employability through LifeSkills⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

‘LifeSkills created with Barclays’ is a free employability programme for 11-24 year olds and we’re thrilled that, to date, we’ve had 5 million young people participate in the programme. Now we’re excited to announce two new initiatives that celebrate the achievements of young people, schools and colleges in their bids to boost career prospects.

What is LifeSkills?
Back in 2013, LifeSkills was launched to support educators address the growing skills gap amongst their students and face the youth employability challenge head on. Developed with educators across all four nations, LifeSkills strives to support educators develop young people’s employability skills through free, curriculum linked education content.
Through lesson plans, interactive challenges, videos and quick-fire activities, as well as student work placements opportunities and sending Barclays volunteers into the classroom, we want to help to bring  career education to life.

What does LifeSkills deliver?                                                                                    LifeSkills covers a range of different themes that all support young people get the skills they need to move forward from education into the 21st century workplace, including building resilience, learning to be a problem solving pro, becoming an expert communicator and mastering money management.

LifeSkills and the Career Education Standard
To make teachers’ lives as easy as possible, we ensure our content is aligned with the Career Education Standard’s goal of improving ‘young people’s ability to make informed decisions about future pathways’.   In particular, throughout the resources we look at how we can fulfil the following criteria highlighted within the standard:

• engage young people in meaningful discussion about their skills development
• develop their understanding of the responsibilities and duties placed on employers and employees
• facilitate young people’s learning and their ability to engage with a rapidly developing landscape of work/career and learning opportunities

Greg Leighton, an employability support officer in Glasgow and member of the LifeSkills Educator Advisory Council is passionate about the programme, stating ‘It’s no longer just about qualifications. Young people now, more than ever, need softer skills like confidence and communication, alongside relevant experience, to meet the demands of a changing world of work. LifeSkills resources are comprehensive, easy to use and essential in helping young people to realise and fulfil their true potential.’
But it doesn’t end there. Now we’re taking the programme to the next level.

LifeSkills Champions
Launched in October, LifeSkills Champions offers young people the chance to gain valuable recognition for boosting their own and their peers’ employability skills through LifeSkills. If you work in education, you can nominate anyone aged 14-19 to become a LifeSkills Champion.
Once nominated, young people are tasked with delivering a series of LifeSkills sessions to their peers. From CV writing to interview preparation, networking best practice and more, the sessions cover core skills and competencies that are essential to employers. What’s more, they’ll be supported along the way with a toolkit, packed full of tips and videos from LifeSkills Ambassadors. When their designated activities have been completed and approved, they’ll receive a ‘LifeSkills created with Barclays’ digital badge to help demonstrate to prospective employers that they’ve got the skills to take on new challenges, act as a leader and motivate others.

The LifeSkills Award
Going hand in hand with LifeSkills Champions is the LifeSkills Award. This recognises schools and colleges which are going above and beyond to support their students to gain the skills they need for better futures using LifeSkills. We know there are so many schools and colleges out there doing amazing work to set their students up for success by embedding LifeSkills across their whole institution, and we want to make sure they’re getting the recognition they deserve. Successful applicants will receive certification that demonstrates their institution’s commitment to championing young people’s employability locally and nationally, as well as to regulators and parents.
You can find out more about these two initiatives, alongside a wealth of free employability skills resources, at barclayslifeskills.com/teachers.

Skills development through outdoor education: Fully funded CPD opportunity⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The Outward Bound trust (Loch Eil) is offering a free CPD opportunity to for teachers /practitioners and employers to explore partnership working around skills development and employability .  

During a 2 day seminar the team at Loch Eil will demonstrate how the outdoor context can develop core skills relevant in supporting young people to realise their  future aspirations and career pathway.   The seminar will make reference to skills development in relation to the Career Education Standard, attainment and wider achievement. 

More information about the seminar and how to sign up here.

Contact:

Freda Fallon,

EDUCATION PARTNERSHIPS – SCOTLAND

The Outward Bound Trust

Loch Eil Centre, Achdalieu

Fort William, PH33 7NN

T 07919 887716

W outwardbound.org.uk

Also:  Access the Outward Bound interesting practice exemplar here.

LANTRA 2017 – Career Workshops and Skills Events⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The latest event in a series of  workshops and events on career pathways and skills development in the land-base, aquaculture and environmental industries, will take place on Thursday, 14 December, Westerwood Hotel, Cumbernauld (10am – 3pm). (contact: 01738 310164 or Scotland@lantra.co.uk)

Two recent LANYRA career workshops run for SDS career staff, teachers, DYW regional groups etc. were held in Perth & Lanark. Here are the links to the presentations from industry speakers :

LANTRA’s website offers plenty of information on  exciting and rewarding jobs in this industry sector, especially for Modern Apprentices. Find out more by signing up for our quarterly newsletter or contacting us LANTRA directly.

And:  The new rural skills video has just been published and can be viewed on  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omCE4wlikqo

Making Scotland a STEM Nation⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

STEM Education and Training Strategy for Scotland has now been published

A STEM (Sciences Technologies, Engineering and Mathematics) Education and Training Strategy was launched in the Scottish Parliament last week by Ms Shirley-Anne Somerville, Minister for Further Education, Higher Education and Science. The Strategy, together with a STEM Evidence Base Report, is now available to download from: http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/10/1386/downloads

A central focus on the strategy is to enable everyone to develop STEM skills for learning, for life and for work. It provides a new emphasis on career pathways within STEM sectors and to grow successful  partnerships between schools and employers through the Developing the Young Workforce Programme.  The strategy also includes a commitment to expand Foundation, Modern and Graduate Apprenticeship Programmes to enable many to pursue jobs and careers in STEM through these pathways. This strong focus on skills and careers will further enhance national efforts to Develop the Young Workforce (DYW) and embed employment and career management skills in the curriculum through the Career Education Standard.

A wide variety and resources including exemplars around DYW and STEM can be accessed on the National Improvement Hub here.

 

Maisondieu Primary School (Angus): Opening horizons and challenging stereotypes through career education⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Rising to the challenge set by the Career Education Standard 3-18, Maisondieu Primary School has woven career education and advice into their curriculum from early years to P7.   Working oin partnerhsup with parents and the wider community the school harnesses a wider range of resources and support including SDS’s online materials to develop skills and career aspirations for the 21 century.  A working group, led by a parent-teacher partnership and local community partners, helped to promote the schools career education .  Many activities including a ‘World of Work Mobile Unit’ and two whole school careers events were arranged. These enable children and young people to actively engage with variety of employers to support learning and understand the skills required for  their future pathways.

The impact of this approach is far-reaching:

  • Pupils are able to connect their learning with the world of work, carefully selected representatives from local employers help challenge stereotypes and provide a more realistic picture of jobs and careers available for young people in the future and the skills required to access these.
  • It also strengthened partnership links with stakeholders in the community.
  • It allowed pupils and staff to reflect upon the entitlements and expectations set out within the Career Education Standard 3-18

Find out more about this initiative  by joining the SLF seminar of Ruth Mcfarlane, teacher at Maisondieu Primary School:  Wednesday, 20 September, 9.30 (Boisedale 2)

 

DYW Interesting Practice – Dalgety Bay Primary School: The Career Education Standard at the heart of school planning⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Laura Spence  , HT at Dalgety Bay Primary School has adopted a unique approach to ensure that career education is an integral part of the school improvement planning.  Embracing  the Career Education Standard 3-18  all staff have used Learning Resource 1:  Introduction to the Career Education Standard in order to embed the entitlements into the learning and teaching across the school.

This approach has become a cluster model and has been recognised by  and share across Fife Council .

The school’s vision of realising their ambitions to provide all children with opportunities to connect leanring with the world of work include the following actions :

  • Teachers will provide creative opportunities to develop the skills for life in meaningful and relevant contexts within their class.
  • All teacher will deliver 4D learning intentions, consistently linking each lesson to career education.
  • Our weekly assemblies will regularly include information on specific careers, making children aware of the range of employment opportunities on offer.
  • Children  from P5 onwards will have access to the ‘My World of Work’ website where they will have the opportunity to explore different career options focusing on skills and qualifications.
  • Classroom displays and planning will include links to Career Education throughout the school.
  • We will continue to engage with local business partners and beyond to develop contacts and create a database of professionals prepared to support the school in developing Career Education within school.
  • We will be planning and organising a Career Education Day that will take place on 22nd November 2016.

Find out more about Dalgety Bay Primary Schools approach by accessing the summary information and school DYW leaflet here:

Interesting Practice in Skills DYW – Dalgety Bay PS

Career Education Leaflet Dalgety Bay PS

 

Career Education Standard (3-18): Exemplification Tool offers a ‘helping hand’⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

ces-exemplification-toolA new tool is now available for practitioners to support planning and developing new practice in career education or to reflect on existing practice.   Based on the ‘I can’ statements in the Career Education Standard (3-18) it provides illustrations of what children and young people might experience in order to help them meet their entitlements.  For ease of reference the entitlements have been appended to the resource and linked to each theme.  The tool  supports  practitioners  to consider what  career education might look like in their own particular contexts and to plan accordingly.

Structure

The exemplification tool groups the entitlements and the illustrative  ‘I can statements’ in five themes and by levels.  Alongside these are suggestions of the types of activities that children and young people might experience as they work towards their entitlements.

The themes are :

  1. Exploring the concept of work (from simulated experiences to the world of work)
  2. Expanding horizons and ambitions
  3. Diversity and equity
  4. Seeking help and information
  5. Finding a route to work

Down load the exemplification tool here:  ces-exemplification-tool

Illustrations of how education establishments have implemented DYW across the curriculum can be found on the Education Scotland ‘Learning Blog’.

Career Education Standard 3 – 18: Suite of Learning Resources⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

A suite of learning resources are currently being produced to  career standardssupport professional  development related to career education.  These resources  will cover a variety of key themes such as labour market information, career management skills, enterprise and entrepreneurship, My world of Work etc. and relate this to Career Education Standard 3-18.

Learning outcomes

As a result of engaging with this learning you will have:

  • an understanding of the purpose and aim of the Career Education Standard (3 – 18) (CES);
  • an understanding of the part you are expected to play, along with partners, in the implementation of the CES;
  • an understanding of the entitlements for children and young people;
  • developed, through self-evaluation, your understanding of the CES expectations in relation to your current practice;
  • identified areas of the CES expectations for your professional learning; and
  • a plan to take forward manageable changes to your practice.

Who is this learning for?

The resources  contribute to professional learning for practitioners at all levels working with children and young people within early learning and childcare, primary, secondary, special schools, colleges, private training providers, third sector providers, social work, community learning and development and other specialist learning providers including secure and residential settings.

Learning resources

Learning Resource 1:  An Introduction to the Career Education Standard 3-18

This resource introduces you to the standard, its context, purpose and expectations in a logical and manageable format. The materials include a self-evaluation tool and contain references to How good is our school? (4th Edition). Engaging with this professional learning resource will help you build on your existing practice.

Downloads :

The following resources are currently in development:

  • Learning Resources 2:  An Introduction to Labour Market Information
  • Learning Resources 3:  An Introduction to Career Management Skills
  • Learning Resources 4:  An Introduction to my World of Work
  • Learning Resources 2:  An Introduction to Enterprise Education

Helping you to help pupils make subject to career connections⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

sharon-orourkeSharon O’Rourke, Skills Development Scotland

Helping young people make connections between what they are learning in classrooms and the world of work they’ll enter when they leave school has been brought into sharp focus by Building the Curriculum 4, the Career Education Standard and of course, Developing the Young Workforce.

Embedding career information and advice web service My World of Work into lessons, using SDS’s newly developed ‘lesson inserts’, is our way of helping you to make that connection for young people without needing to be a career expert yourself.

What are lesson inserts?

Lesson inserts are our answer to the common pupil question ‘why are we doing this?’

Co-created with teachers, for teachers, these are short, easy-to-use and adaptable activities, linking curriculum topics to careers by using the wealth of information on My World of Work.

The lesson inserts use the ‘plan on a page’ format. All essential information is in one place, brief and to the point, so you don’t need a lot of preparation time to use them; just pick it up and it’s ready to go. They are also flexible enough for teachers to expand or shorten the activities to meet the needs of their lesson.

How it works in practice

The short activities set out a range of ways to help young people make career connections.

These could be links to a job profile or film lasting only a few minutes featuring a person working in a certain career. For example during a biology lesson on dissection, a link to the job profile for a pathologist has a handy video showing the job in action.

Alternatively, individual or group exercises can encourage deeper careers research by perhaps asking pupils to complete a quiz or worksheet which requires searching My World of Work for the answers.

Or perhaps the activity might be given as homework to pupils to research jobs on My World of Work that are related to your subject with an action to discuss any common skills across them all in your next lesson.

At Whitburn Academy, Computing Science teachers are using the lesson inserts to show pupils and their parents how vital the subject is across a variety of careers. They are designing activities that mix careers research with practical programming activities to show the link to modern day jobs, such as Web or Games design, as well as the part programming plays in more traditional trades, such as electrician. This encourages young people to understand the breadth of opportunity their subject offers.  The teachers used the subject choice tool to research careers information for their lesson inserts, which they said increased their confidence to promote the subject in school and at parents’ evenings.

Keeping it current

As you know, My World of Work is part of the range of support on offer from Skills Development Scotland.

The information it holds is regularly updated, ensuring pupils are always accessing the most up-to-date information possible.

Using links to My World of Work helps young people develop career management skills and widens their career horizons as they become more informed about the career choices available to them.

Using My World of Work also provides the opportunity for teachers to build their career intelligence, whilst increasing their knowledge of what’s available on the site from the perspective, not just of a teacher, but as an individual, and perhaps as a parent as well.

Get Involved

We are still early in the process of creating lesson inserts, and are keen to work with teachers across all subjects to create more.

Examples of the lesson inserts that have recently been developed with teachers can be found in the partner area of My World of Work.

If you’re not registered or haven’t used the range of resources we have for teachers on My World of Work, why not sign up as a partner today and get involved?

The partner development and integration (PD&I) team at SDS are here to support you every step of the way. We really believe that these lesson inserts can be a useful, inspiring tool to support learning in your classroom.

We all want to see young people go on to successful and fulfilling careers when they leave school.

These lesson inserts are another way for us all to support them to do just that.

If you’d like to get involved email sharon.orourke@sds.co.uk