Tag Archives: Broad General Education

Resources to support health and wellbeing in Gaelic Medium Education (GME)⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The Safer Scotland Scottish Government website has resources to support children learning through the medium of Gaelic. These include interactive games and stories.  Please visit:

http://gaelic.gosafewithziggy.com/

Road Safety – ‘Go Safe with Ziggy’ Competition

Ziggy’s BIG competition is about helping children learn about road safety in a fun, creative way.  This is part of a Scotland-wide movement to help young children be safe on roads and about traffic. The competition is open until the end of April 2018.

LANGUAGE LEARNING IN SCOTLAND: A 1+2 APPROACH: Further guidance on L3⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Education Scotland is evidencing many successes for Gaelic (Learners) from the implementation of the policy, Language Learning in Scotland: a 1+2 Approach. Teachers’ commitment to delivering Gaelic within the curriculum is acknowledged.  A presentation on the successes and challenges for Gaelic from implementing the policy is available here.  One such challenge is that there are many children learning Gaelic as L3 in primary schools for whom  a progression pathway into secondary is still to be identified.  However, a newly-announced change to how L3 may be delivered may assist with this.  In Scotland, we also have an important target to meet in increasing the number of speakers of Gaelic as part of the National Gaelic Language Plan.  For this, education has a key role.

Currently, at the primary stages, children who experience a coherent and progressive experience of L3 from P5-P7 may choose to continue with that language into S1 and to the end of the broad general education (BGE).  For purposes of planning the secondary curriculum, this language would become young people’s L2.  For this to be the case, children need to have achieved the second level by the end of P7.  In addition, there should be pathways to National Qualifications in the senior phase for that language.  The 1+2 policy has recently been relaxed to state that L3 may be the language that children continue with, as they move from primary to secondary, if schools are able to demonstrate that children’s achievements are “approaching the second level”.  To achieve this, the planning for the L3 language needs to result in a coherent and progressive experience from P5-P7.  This new arrangement does not replace the opportunity for schools to introduce more than one language as L3.

Here are some useful steps to guide how you may incorporate this new delivery model for L3 into planning for improvement:

  • Revisit your curriculum rationale, particularly in light of the local context, to ascertain if increasing the numbers approaching the second level of Gaelic (Learners) is a priority for your school.
  • Ensure strong links between primary and secondary specialists who are delivering Gaelic (Learners).
  • Work with the other primaries in your cluster and the associated secondary school to plan a coherent 3-18 experience.
  • Review the structure of the curriculum to see how you can plan learning, teaching and assessment to enable children’s achievements to be approaching the second level.
  • Review how well you use the contexts of the curriculum as a means of increasing outcomes for Gaelic and assisting young people in making connections in their learning.
  • Review how you are using Gaelic partners and organisations to increase the time allocated to Gaelic (Learners) in the curriculum.
  • Plan for progression and coherence by using the experiences and outcomes to show how you will develop knowledge, skills, attributes and capabilities of the four capacities.
  • Plan the use of Benchmarks for Gaelic (Learners) to set out clear statements about what learners need to know and be able to do to achieve a level across all curriculum areas.
  • Plan how you will integrate Gaelic (Learners) as a language in the life and work of the school.
  • Use the principles of curriculum design to plan learning to motivate children in their learning of Gaelic.  In particular, ensure that children understand the relevance of Gaelic, including for achieving a positive destination on leaving school.

For more information on the delivery of L3 in the 3-18 curriculum, please see Language Learning in Scotland: A 1+2 Approach – Further guidance on L3 within the 1+2 policy.  It is a matter for schools to determine the exact design of the curriculum, using the flexibility that Curriculum for Excellence affords them, to ensure that children’s achievements are “approaching a second level”.

Pupils across Scotland invited to take part in the John Byrne National Drawing Competition⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Budding young artists in Scotland are being urged to enter the fourth annual John Byrne National Drawing Competition.

Since the launch of the competition in 2014, thousands of pupils across Scotland have submitted their artwork to be judged by the renowned artist and playwright himself, John Byrne.

The competition, in partnership with Education Scotland, is aimed at pupils from primary four through to third year.

John Byrne, along with a selection panel, will choose the overall winners and 30 runners up, whose work will then be exhibited at Paisley Museum and Art Gallery on Friday 16 March.

John said: “I’m really excited to launch the fourth year of the annual John Byrne National Drawing Competition and see the creative flair and talent that we have within our schools.

“It’s really important that we give young people opportunities like this to use their imagination and express their creativity and love for drawing. This competition is a great way to showcase their talent and, once again, I look forward to seeing the remarkable variety of entries.”

Last year’s competition winner, Cameron Lawson (S3) from Cedarbank School, West Lothian was selected from over 4,000 children and young people from across Scotland. Cameron said: “My art teacher encouraged me to enter the competition I was really surprised when I found out that I’d won but it was great to see my artwork on display.  I would encourage pupils to take part as it’s a great experience.  My advice would be to try your best and use your imagination.”

Ron Cowie, Senior Education Officer at Education Scotland, added: “Art and design is an important part of the curriculum and this competition aims to encourage pupils across Scotland to develop their drawing skills and be creative. Education Scotland is proud to be involved in this competition as it is a great way to promote drawing in schools.”

To help pupils with their entries, we’ll be sharing a top tip from John each week on the Education Scotland Facebook and Twitter pages.

The closing date for entries is Friday 23 February 2018.

John Byrne National Drawing Competition 2017 – Competition Rules FINALfor competition rules and information about submitting entries.

Case Study: Increasing the uptake for languages in the senior phase⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Scotland’s National Centre for Languages (SCILT) has published a case study which focuses on increasing the uptake for languages as young people move from the broad general education into the senior phase.   It demonstrates how self-evaluation has been used to secure improvements.

The case study is available here:

https://www.scilt.org.uk/Portals/24/Library/news/2017/St%20Thomas%20Aquinas%20Secondary%20School%20Case%20Study.pdf?ver=2017-11-17-162149-840

To use a similar approach for Gàidhlig and learning through the medium of Gaelic, please consider using the following:

How good is our school? (fourth edition)

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/frwk2hgios

Section 2 of the statutory Guidance on Gaelic Education

http://www.gaidhlig.scot/bord/education/statutory-guidance/

Advice on Gaelic Education: Secondary stages (Gaelic Medium Education)

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/Documents/Gael3-9secondarystages.pdf

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/Documents/Gael3-9rean%c3%a1rdsgoile.pdf

Quality and Improvement in Scottish Education: Gaelic Medium Education

https://education.gov.scot/Documents/QuISEGaelic%20Medium%20Education.pdf

Gaelic Medium Education: self-improvement, attainment and leadership

https://blogs.glowscotland.org.uk/glowblogs/eslb/2017/06/08/gaelic-medium-education-self-improvement-attainment-and-leadership/

 

Case Study: Increasing the uptake for languages in the senior phase⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Scotland’s National Centre for Languages (SCILT) has published a case study which focuses on increasing the uptake for languages as young people move from the broad general education into the senior phase. It demonstrates how self-evaluation has been used to secure improvements.

The case study is available here:

https://www.scilt.org.uk/Portals/24/Library/news/2017/St%20Thomas%20Aquinas%20Secondary%20School%20Case%20Study.pdf?ver=2017-11-17-162149-840

To use a similar approach for Gaelic (Learners), please consider using the following:

How good is our school? (fourth edition)

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/frwk2hgios

Gaelic Learner Education and a 1+2 Approach to Languages

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/Documents/Gael3-16curriculum318LanguageLearning12.pdf

Paragraphs 2.24 – 2.28 of the statutory Guidance on Gaelic Education

http://www.gaidhlig.scot/bord/education/statutory-guidance/

 

Support Materials: Quality Assurance and Moderation⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The Moderation Hub on Glow contains materials which will assist practitioners in GME to develop a shared understanding of standards and expectations in the BGE. They can also be used to support teacher professional judgements. 

A login is required.

 

Making Scotland a STEM Nation⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

STEM Education and Training Strategy for Scotland has now been published

A STEM (Sciences Technologies, Engineering and Mathematics) Education and Training Strategy was launched in the Scottish Parliament last week by Ms Shirley-Anne Somerville, Minister for Further Education, Higher Education and Science. The Strategy, together with a STEM Evidence Base Report, is now available to download from: http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/10/1386/downloads

A central focus on the strategy is to enable everyone to develop STEM skills for learning, for life and for work. It provides a new emphasis on career pathways within STEM sectors and to grow successful  partnerships between schools and employers through the Developing the Young Workforce Programme.  The strategy also includes a commitment to expand Foundation, Modern and Graduate Apprenticeship Programmes to enable many to pursue jobs and careers in STEM through these pathways. This strong focus on skills and careers will further enhance national efforts to Develop the Young Workforce (DYW) and embed employment and career management skills in the curriculum through the Career Education Standard.

A wide variety and resources including exemplars around DYW and STEM can be accessed on the National Improvement Hub here.

 

Slatan-tomhais litearrachd agus Beurla / Benchmarks for literacy and English⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Tha na Slatan-tomhais airson litearrachd agus Beurla a nis ri fhaighinn ann an Gàidhlig aig:

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/Pages/Curriculum-for-Excellence-Benchmarks-.aspx

 The Gaelic version of the Benchmarks for literacy and English are now available at: 

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/Pages/Curriculum-for-Excellence-Benchmarks-.aspx

Pedagogy for acquiring an additional language⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

https://schoolsonline.britishcouncil.org/sites/default/files/primary_languages_starter_pack.pdf

 

This resource, although it does not refer directly to Gaelic (Learners), has some useful information on second language acquisition. It may also be useful when planning the deployment of Language Assistants.

Building the GME Curriculum⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Following on from the successful conference, Transitions to Secondary we are pleased to announce two further opportunities to support the development of the secondary GME curriculum.

The Scottish Learning Festival (SLF) is Scotland’s key educational event. We look forward to inviting you to a seminar for Gaelic Medium Education (GME) at 9.30am on Wednesday 20 September.  This will have a focus on promoting excellence and equity for learners through an improved GME curriculum.  We are delighted to invite Angus MacLennan, the headteacher of e-Sgoil, to co-present with us.  Angus will share how e-Sgoil has been using technology to deliver different aspects of the curriculum to schools throughout Scotland.  This seminar will be of interest to senior managers, teachers and curriculum partners.  Registration for SLF 2017 is still open.

Following on from the SLF, we will provide professional learning at An t-Alltan to support the delivery of the secondary GME curriculum. E-Sgoil will co-present with us.  This session will give practitioners an opportunity to become familiar with the digital technology that is used by e-Sgoil while promoting effective pedagogy.  Registration for An t-Alltan is now open.  Please visit,  www.storlann.co.uk/an-t-alltan.

Please also refer to our Advice on Gaelic Education, some of which is statutory, on how to structure and design a curriculum for GME.